RAURY Wed 11/18 Hawthorne Theatre
STRANGE WILDS Thurs 11/19 Bunk Bar Che Hise-Gattone

WEDNESDAY 11/18

CAT HOCH, RIO GRANDS, DIRTY WHIPS
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

EDNA VAZQUEZ, THREE FOR SILVER
(The Old Church, 1422 SW 11th) See My, What a Busy Week!

YO LA TENGO
(Revolution Hall, 1300 SE Stark) Read our article on Yo La Tengo.

EVERCLEAR, HYDRA MELODY
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Read our article on Everclear.

RAURY, INDIA SHAWN, MAGIC FADES
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) Raury is nothing if not intriguing. The 19-year-old Atlantan has been touted as a wunderkind: a charismatic performer, producer, singer, and rapper with a grandiose vision. You could call Raury's music stadium-sized folk-rap, though the joy of his two records is in the genre hopping. Indigo Child was released for free in 2014, and it's more direct and texturally superior to his 2015 major label debut, All We Need. Each track grows from a disparate seed, be it dark synths and soul samples to classical guitar strums and sub-bass womps. They're sewn together by Raury's idealistic, sentimental, young-love revolution. At times, though, he loses the thread by weaving so many. In "Devil's Whisper," Raury sings, "I could be MLK/I could be Juicy J." And while he certainly doesn't have to choose, he's still got a ways to go in realizing, wrangling, refining, and wrestling his full potential. ANDREW R TONRY

LUCERO
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) For a band with a sound so deeply rooted in their home city's musical past, Memphis alt-country band Lucero have sure spent a lot of time on the road. That said, it's been more than two years since frontman Ben Nichols and his crew last graced us with a set of their lively, emotive, whiskey-soaked tunes. Last time through town, Lucero teamed up with Sturgill Simpson as part of the Mercury's inaugural Chili Jamboree. Tonight you'll need to fill that belly on your own, but you can be sure Lucero will throw a party. The band's 11th full-length, All a Man Should Do, sees the group further entangle themselves within the story of the Memphis sound. The album takes its name from the Big Star song "I'm in Love with a Girl," which Lucero do a splendid job of covering, with backing vocals from Big Star drummer Jody Stephens. CHIPP TERWILLIGER

SHE SHREDS PARTY: CHANTI DARLING, THUNDERPUSSY, THE GHOST EASE, VERA RUBIN, CLAUDIA MEZA
(The Liquor Store, 3341 SE Belmont) The Ghost Ease have emerged as one of the torchbearers of Portland punk with their second full-length album, Raw, released in September on K Records subsidiary Cabin Games. It's a refinement of the dream-punk-grunge of their 2013 self-titled debut rather than a complete overhaul. Both albums are highlighted by the trio's ability to capture unbridled energy in three-minute quiet/loud sonic shifts of grunge forebearers like Pixes and Kill Sybil. However, where Raw shows the biggest improvements is in the subtler lulls that sound closer to ye-ye pop before returning to unhinged distortion. This show will also act as the third birthday and ninth issue release party of the Portland magazine She Shreds. Over the past three years, She Shreds has consistently been one of the preeminent sources of well-written, nuanced music journalism, while also evolving into one of the best underground concert curators. CAMERON CROWELL

PROF, NACHO PICASSO, FUNDO
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) Seattle's Nacho Picasso is proudly obnoxious and delightfully dumb. A drugged-out, degenerate party animal, he's like a rap version of the Mean Jeans. Like those loveable jester-goons, Nacho is everything but self-serious with jokey songs that place the party above the ego. Both have written about coke (and the girls who sniff it all) and weed (the Jeans' "Stoned 2 the Bone" vs. Nacho's Stoned and Dethroned mixtape). There are differences, of course: Nacho is a laidback, scraped-voiced emcee whose sparse tunes are just as at home in a strip club as at an after-party. But like the Jeans, Nacho is smarter than he lets on. And while he might be in the business of killing brain cells, he's got a few to spare. ART

THURSDAY 11/19

FRIENDS AND FRIENDS OF FRIENDS VOLUME 8 RELEASE: LOCH LOMOND, TRANSISTOR SEND, BED, & MORE
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

STRANGE WILDS
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Olympia's Strange Wilds released their first LP, Subjective Concepts, this summer, and it's a successful refurbishing of fellow Sub Pop labelmates and Pacific Northwest demigods Nirvana's trademark ominous grayscale grunge. This is especially palpable on songs like "Autothysis" (a term that means to explode oneself), which feels like it could easily pass as a Nevermind B-side. Make no mistake—Strange Wilds can wail, and their dirty hardcore chugs through the sludge like a monster truck in a mud pit. Sour twanging guitar navigate menacing bass lines, and serves as a backdrop for unforgiving, accusing screams. Subjective Concepts fits comfortably within the familiar grunge-punk genre, as if Kurt Cobain returned from beyond the grave to produce the group's debut. CIARA DOLAN

YUNA, FRANCESCA BLANCHARD
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) With the smooth vocal timbre of Sade, Feist-y soft pop tones, and her own brand of dark angst, Yuna's sound is like candy for those of us that appreciate a prominent rhythm but have our introspective sides. The 29-year-old singer/songwriter studied law in her home country of Malaysia, where she started writing her own music at age 14. Since releasing her first album in 2008, Yuna has garnered numerous music awards and nominations, played American festivals, produced songs that were featured in American movies and TV shows, had Pharrell produce her first hit single, and owns her own clothing boutique. Her most recent international album, 2013's Nocturnal, encapsulates everything she does well: sing with sweet sincerity and blend electronic-infused pop with a smattering of indie-folk and R&B, creating a sound that's recognizable and catchy, yet truly unique. ROSE FINN

MISFITS, SHE DEMONS
(Bossanova Ballroom, 722 E Burnside) Like the defiantly living skull from their iconic logo (arguably more famous than their music), Misfits have been trudging along undead since reuniting in 1995 sans chief creative force, the Milk Dud-guzzling, brick-throwing, cat litter-carrying horror-punk/metal icon Glenn Danzig. The band's initial catalog remains a vital font of bubblegum pop hooks, punk aggression, and macabre horror-movie goofiness; their discography since reformation, however, is unsurprisingly inessential. Outfits like the 2015 Misfits don't thrive off of record sales, though—they just need warm bodies in the room. Like so many dismembered punk bands, Misfits' live show is essentially Jerry Only and some other guys playing Misfits originals interspersed with crackerjack covers, but, hey, if you wanted to see somebody play "Hybrid Moments" live, this is probably your best option. MAC POGUE

NATHANIEL TALBOT, MOOREA MASA, WINDUS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) There is a calm sensibility to Nathaniel Talbot, songs that could only come from the salty countryside of the Pacific Northwest. Singing of heart and humanity in a lush landscape of cattails and mountain rivers, Talbot's poetic lyrics and hypnotizing finger-picking feel familiar. He keeps in the tradition of artists like Woody Guthrie and Lyle Lovett, and his new album Swamp Rose and Honeysuckle Vine stays away from flashiness. The Whidbey Island songwriter shares the stage with the stunning Moorea Masa, returning from recent travels with her own folk trio supporting her recent EP release and as the backing trio for El Vy, including a recent performance on Conan. With a subtlety and maturity to her performances beyond her age, Masa continues to pave a path worthy of praise. JENI WREN STOTTRUP

THE CHARLATANS, EYELIDS
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) Among American fans of Britpop, the Charlatans never really rolled off the tongue with as much commercial and critical attention as their contemporaries, like Blur, Pulp, and Supergrass. I would argue, however, that no band to emerge from the post-Smiths Britain has been as consistently great. Nor have any of their peers put out a recent album as wonderful as the Charlatans' 2015 LP Modern Nature. The quartet from the West Midlands have found new shades of their colorful psychedelic pop, evoking Krautrock glory on "Talking in Tones," '70s soul, and a touch of the danceable grooves that marked their earliest work. ROBERT HAM

MILO, SAFARI AL, KENNY SEGAL, JELLYFISH BRIGADE
(Kelly's Olympian, 426 SW Washington) Labels such as "art-rap" and "nerdcore" are a convenient way for music writers to categorize and codify, yet ultimately those labels do a disservice to the artists boxed into those parameters. Tonight finds an elite cadre of talented young artists who willfully and playfully reject those constraints, using the foundations of hip-hop as a jumping-off point to dive deep into unexplored pools of new sounds. Headliner Milo is celebrating his latest release, So the Flies Don't Come, which finds him spitting his encyclopedic, spaced-out flow over Kenny Segal's dizzy production. Portland's own Jellyfish Brigade, the duo of emcee Lucas Dix and producer the Great Mundane, are a local act whose national acclaim outweighs recognition in their own city. Arrive early to witness what the rest of the country has already deemed dope. RYAN FEIGH

DALÍ QUARTET
(The Old Church, 1422 SW 11th) I'm lucky to live a short walk away from the Portland Mercado—a neighborhood hotspot where a host of Latin American food carts constantly beckon. Throughout the day, it has become embarrassingly easy to fill my mouth with empanadas and tamales, but tonight I have the chance to fill my ears with south-of-the-border goodness as well, thanks to the folks at Friends of Chamber Music. They've been bringing the finest small-scale ensembles to Rip City for 77 years, and this evening they play host to the Dalí String Quartet with an all-Latin program on tap. Refreshingly far removed from Vienna, the setlist features works from Venezuela, Panama, Argentina, and Cuba, as well as Brazilian composer Heitor Villa-Lobos and his Quartet No. 1, a brilliant creation of six chapters, each one possessing a distinctive sonic flavor miraculously concocted by nothing but a viola, cello, and a pair of fiddles. Final shoutout: The Old Church is one of the great music venues in town, and if you haven't yet experienced its unique joys, this gig is guaranteed to warm up the pews. BRIAN HORAY

FRIDAY 11/20

BØRNS, AVID DANCER
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) I don't know Garrett Borns, but I'm going to guess that his life pretty much changed 42 weeks ago when the leader of the free world, Taylor Swift, big-upped him on Instagram. "So 'Electric Love' by Børns sounds like an instant classic to me," she wrote about one of Borns' songs, before adding #justsayingggg for maximum internet cheekiness. "Instant classic" seems like a stretch, but Borns, who records music under the name Børns, does know how to write a hook. On his debut album, Dopamine, the Michigan native takes sugary, sky-high melodies, drapes them over modern bedroom electropop, and pushes it all through the faux-indie filter du jour. Think Tame Impala set to Haim-style synth-pop and you're on the right track. Is it pleasurable? Sure. Classic? Nah. Gonna be huge? Probably. Once dude got the T-Swift 'gram of approval, it was only a matter of time. BEN SALMON

LOW, ANDY SHAUF
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) The days are getting shorter, the nights are getting colder, and fallen leaves are clogging up gutters and flooding the streets. What better time to descend into the Doug Fir basement for the beautifully somber music of Low? For over two decades, the Duluth, Minnesota, trio—guided by Alan Sparhawk and Mimi Parker—have been crafting, experimenting, and perfecting their minimalistic, elegiac slowcore, with varying results. After the acoustic sparseness of the Jeff Tweedy-produced The Invisible Way, Low withdrew into Justin Vernon's Wisconsin studio with producer BJ Burton, and recorded Ones and Sixes, their 11th album, featuring a bigger and more sweeping production than their previous work, and incorporating more of the electronic elements they last used on 2007's Drums and Guns. One and Sixes may not be their strongest work to date (there are many possible candidates for that spot), but even a decent Low album is still a thing of awe and transcendence. And, yes, gloom. Definitely gloom. SANTI ELIJAH HOLLEY

AMAROK, BADR VOGU, TSEPESCH, DIASPORA
(Panic Room, 3100 NE Sandy) Representing the doomier underbelly of his primary project Cold Blue Mountain, Brandon Squyres slowed down the more nuanced focus of his aggressions with Amarok. Formed in 2010, the Chico, California-based quartet play bleak molasses riffs, like a predator hunting prey in slow motion. In 2014, the band released a split with Hell on super-underground metal label Pesanta Urfolk, featuring the 20-minute "Red Oak Wisdom," a punishing exercise in guttural vocals, low-end distortion, and sludgy reverence. There are dynamics, too, just as are found in Cold Blue Mountain's diverse influences; the best example can be found around the nine-minute mark of "Red Oak Wisdom," when a piano-and-string interlude builds up for what seems an eternity before the crescendo of looming feedback finally busts open again, revealing some new nightmare. RYAN J. PRADO

ELEPHANT STONE, HOLLOW SIDEWALKS
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Elephant Stone catalyst Rishi Dhir is a silky-voiced psych-rock classicist, a studious disciple of the mellow, fluid end of the genre's spectrum, circa 1967-1969. His band's self-titled 2013 album wears its Byrds and Revolver/Sgt. Pepper's-era Beatles worship prominently, with "A Silent Moment," exemplifying the latter with its "Rain" meets "Within You Without You" moves. "The Sea of Your Mind" reveals the group at their most expansive and outré; one wishes they went to that extreme more often. If you're a sucker for sitars and tablas (and why wouldn't you be?), you should enjoy Elephant Stone's tasteful use of them. Their latest full-length, Three Poisons, follows the path Tame Impala have taken, in that it's slicker and more dance-oriented than earlier releases (no Kula Shaker). Depending on your disposition, it'll seem either like a logical progression or a misstep. DAVE SEGAL

CULT BABIES, AH GOD
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) While you were busy cowering in cool basements or spending days at the river to escape the summer's record-setting heat waves, local lo-fi fuzz warriors Ah God unleashed one of the year's weirdest, wildest sounding garage-rock records. The self-titled sophomore album follows in the footsteps of their promising 2013 debut, Ah Fuck, and it sees the band continue to develop their unique art-grunge sound. It's been released as a limited-run cassette on Seattle-based DIY label HalfShell Records. Fittingly, Ah God are joined tonight by Vancouver psych-rock outfit, Cult Babies, whose new album, Off to See the Lizard, sounds like the product of a band who spent half the summer soaking up rays and surfing waves at the beach, and the other half ripping gravity bongs and rocking out to Black Sabbath somewhere in a dark and dingy basement. CT

SATURDAY 11/21

SUMMER CANNIBALS, DIVERS, SIOUX FALLS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See My, What a Busy Week!

MIDDAY VEIL, SWAHILI, ANTECESSOR
(Kenton Club, 2025 N Kilpatrick) Read our article on Midday Veil.

THE FALL OF TROY, KYLESA, POWWERS, WE THE WILD
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) See All-Ages Action!

PORTLAND SOUNDCHECK: NATE BOTSFORD, BRANT COLELLA, SAMSEL, HITCHES
(Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta) As Portland becomes more of a city, it becomes harder to keep tabs on the pulse of the community. That little conundrum was the basis for a few folks to launch Portland Soundcheck, a collective that focuses on showcasing under-the-radar artists within our growing metropolis. For tonight's fifth installment, the crew's put together a line-up of country-leaning folkateers who'll show their stuff at the Alberta Rose, so if you're feeling lost in the city, head to the Rose and meet some new friends. ROBIN BACIOR

BIM FOR MAYOR CAMPAIGN LAUNCH: WOODEN INDIAN BURIAL GROUND, SAM COOMES
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) 2016 might be the year that breaks the record for earliest onset of election fatigue. After all, we're still practically 12 months out from Election Day and the stupid presidential race is all anyone can talk about. Before we all get totally burned out, though, let's look more locally—specifically, next year's race for mayor of Portland. Bim Ditson, drummer for And And And and chain-mail maker at Saturday Market, has thrown his mohawked hair into the ring early, and if his chances seems farfetched, you haven't considered how Ditson instigated the annual Rigsketball tournament and has been an admirable advocate of Portland's live music scene for years. The man's nothing if not dedicated. Tonight Ditson's campaign kicks off with a free blowout featuring some great bands in order to raise 100 signatures to get Bim on the ballot. NED LANNAMANN

YOUTH LAGOON, TAYLOR MCFERRIN
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Youth Lagoon is the dream-pop alias of Boise native Trevor Powers, whose 2011 debut The Year of Hibernation remains a mainstay as a soundtrack for hip makeout sessions. This album illustrates Youth Lagoon's sound, which essentially is the echoey, delicate, ethereal cooing of Powers, whose sweet voice sounds as gentle as bubbles popping. Youth Lagoon's third album, Savage Hills Ballroom, came out in September, a follow-up to 2013's Wondrous Bughouse, where he dipped his toe in some heavy psych experimentation. In the new album Powers sounds crisp and surprisingly present, compared to the characteristically distant vocals on the first two albums. A highlight is the saccharine, haunting piano song "Doll's Estate," which evokes Aphex Twin's "Avril 14th." Powers finds his voice on Savage Hills Ballroom, and engages in a way that makes Youth Lagoon feel more interactive and relatable than his previous releases. CD

1859 RECORDS SHOWCASE: NO///SÉ, SÓL, STRANGEWEATHER, THE SIEGE FIRE
(Black Water Bar, 835 NE Broadway) 1859 Records officially moved from Portland to Corvallis several months ago, but the great underground punk/metal label is still heavily involved with the Portland scene. On Saturday, for example, 1859 will hold its first live showcase at Black Water Bar, featuring two local bands and one with members split between here and Oakland. Let's review them, shall we? No///sé (pronounced "no say") plays punk rock that's both burly and melodic; their 2015 album Lower Berth is a rad slab of dusky Wipers/Dirtnap worship. Sól's mix of post-rock and blackened sludge is alternately beautiful and brutal. Check out their Black Mountain album for some serious stylistic whiplash. And Strangeweather's self-titled album on 1859 is an uncommon collision of mildly creepy, cosmopolitan folk sounds and occasional forays into the heavy darkness. As always, 1859 Records supports cool and interesting music. BS

THE GROUCH AND ELIGH, CHALI 2NA, THE REMINDERS
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) The Grouch and Eligh are arguably two of the most underrated emcees on the scene. I would qualify their collaboration as sophisticated, introspective hip-hop, with lyrics mindful of the world around them, and a sound that's musical and intricate. Oakland's the Grouch and LA's Eligh released their first album together in the Bay Area in 1998, at the height of the indie hip-hop movement. They're both involved with the rap group Living Legends, the Grouch being a founding member. Both members have dabbled in producing and emceeing all over the underground rap scene—from Felt to Zion I, with some Pretty Lights in between. Their sound usually consists of a swirling melody, politically and socially conscious lyrics, and a bobbing yet lingering beat. RF

SHOOK TWINS, ANNALISA TORNFELT AND THE SOUND OUTSIDE, TALL HEIGHTS
(Revolution Hall, 1300 SE Stark) If you fancy yourself as someone who keeps up with local music, there's a good chance you've heard of the Shook Twins. And there's good reason, because those twins work like an army. Their success is growing in a grassroots fashion, and not the kind that just involves selfies on Instagram. Their twin voices shape flawless harmonies, with a fluidity that likely comes not only from blood ties but endless touring. Their bluegrass-tinged, upbeat jam folk comes close to cliché, but it clearly comes from such an honest place it can't help but be respected and enjoyed. RB

SUNDAY 11/22

BLACK SUNDAY: GIFTS AND RIFFS
(Eagles Lodge, 4904 SE Hawthorne) See My, What a Busy Week!

SANKOFA: POPGOJI, WAMBA
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Portland's Popgogi is a collective attuned to honoring Brazilian culture, '50s pop, and Amy Winehouse—our own city's version of Postmodern Jukebox. With highly infectious sets of brass and drums, stepping into one of their shows is an experience. This fall, they're extending this experience with the first Sankofa night, collaborating with the Afrobeat-influenced Wamba and the Rejoice Diaspora Dance Theater to pay tribute to West African musical roots. Sankofa's Ghana namesake means "reach back and get it," meaning you have to know your history to move forward into the future. JWS

NIKKI LANE, CLEAR PLASTIC MASKS, JENNY DON'T AND THE SPURS
(Dante's, 350 W Burnside) A full year and a half has passed since Nikki Lane released her fine sophomore album, All or Nothin', and the Nashville-based singer/songwriter has done some stuff since then. She toured with a whole bunch of different kinds of artists, from Jenny Lewis to Shakey Graves to Social Distortion; played big ol' parties like Bumbershoot and the Newport Folk Festival; opened her own vintage clothing boutique in Music City; and racked up tons of positive reviews for the album. (Paste magazine said All or Nothin' sounds like "Polaroids from a wild heart gone ragged" and name-checked Dusty Springfield, Loretta Lynn, and Jackie DeShannon in its review.) Now, Lane will spend the winter working on a follow-up, but not before she stops at Dante's for an evening of old-school country, early rock 'n' roll, garage-pop, blues, and soul. Good times. BS

MONDAY 11/23

MINUS THE BEAR, MURDER BY DEATH, AERO FLYNN
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) I first heard Minus the Bear when I uncovered a set of MP3s tucked away on a desktop in my high school's computer lab. Their catchy underdog status lends itself to this sort of furtive discovery. Minus the Bear's sugary emo math rock sounded patently futuristic in the early 2000s when their debut, Highly Refined Pirates, came out. Their sound may have dated itself a bit as experimental rock for the Warped Tour set (not a knock), but they have firmly established a legacy as inventive cultural ambassadors to the Northwest. Who would have thought that history would smile kindly on the writers of "Wanna Throw Up? Get Me Naked"? MP Also see All-Ages Action!

GOGOL BORDELLO, JESSICA HERNANDEZ AND THE DELTAS
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) This year marks the 10th anniversary of Gogol Bordello's third full-length, Gypsy Punks: Underdog World, the album that officially gave name to the genre, merging traditional Romani folk music and more straightforward punk. While the band is centered around Ukrainian-born songwriter Eugene Hütz, who sings in English, Russian, and Spanish (to name a few), the band's eight members come from all around the world, including Russia, Belarus, Scotland, Ecuador, and Ethiopia, resulting in an eclectic combination of world music that reaches far beyond the term "gypsy punk." Despite a deep seven-album discography, Gogol Bordello are possibly most famous from when Hütz starred alongside everyone's fourth favorite hobbit in the 2005 drama Everything Is Illuminated. The rest of the band also makes a cameo as buskers playing the traditional Yiddish song "Bublitschki" in a Ukrainian train station. CC

TUESDAY 11/24

GILL LANDRY, CHRISTOPHER PAUL STELLING
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) If you only know Gill Landry from his decade-long association with Old Crow Medicine Show—or as his early alter ego, Frank Lemon, with busking jug band, the Kitchen Syncopaters—you don't really know Landry. While the darlings of Nashville have been traveling the world, winning Grammys, and being inducted into the Grand Ole Opry, Landry has been quietly writing his own subdued, pensive music, which couldn't be further from the stringband sound of OCMS. Landry's first solo album, 2004's cinematic, jazz- and blues-influenced The Ballad of Lawless Soirez, was produced by Portland's Nick Jaina. In 2011 he put out his second album, the New Orleans-inspired Piety and Desire, a beautiful if uneven collection. His third, self-titled solo album, released last March, is also far removed from his previous work, and it is his strongest yet. Landry's best songs are mournful Americana ballads of broken dreams and lost love, and his latest album is filled beginning to end with more broken dreams and lost loves than a Tennessee Williams play. SEH

THIS CHARMING MAN, THE SHITTY BEATLES
(The Liquor Store, 3341 SE Belmont) I wish I could tell you there is a light that never goes out. But alas, Portland's finest Smiths/Morrissey cover band, This Charming Man, is dimming the lights and drawing the curtain after tonight's farewell performance. With XRAY.fm's Jeremy Petersen in the role of Steven Patrick Morrissey, the group captures all the swooning and high drama you've come to cherish from history's most ridiculous rock star. For their final show, This Charming Man is joined by a Fab Four cover band featuring Mo Troper called the Shitty Beatles, who are neither shitty nor the Beatles. Full disclosure: Petersen and Troper are contributors to this music section; my Creedence cover band, CCAren't, was not invited to perform. NL

CATHERINE FEENY AND CHRIS JOHNEDIS, PORTLAND JAZZ COMPOSERS ENSEMBLE, BLUE CRANES
(Alberta Street Pub, 1036 NE Alberta) In its first major collaborative effort, the Portland Jazz Composers Ensemble is partnering with some of the city's best singer/songwriters for an evening of worlds colliding. It makes sense, considering the blurred lines of some of Portland's experimental jazz collectives like Blue Cranes (who are also on this bill) and local drummer Barra Brown's projects (the Wishermen, Old Wave). Tonight Catherine Feeny and Chris Johnedis explore new arrangements of their protest-folk compositions, along with the PJCE Wind Quintet. Rare collaborations like this are a big reason Portland's artistic community is able to persevere in the face of fleeting trends. RJP