THURSDAY 9/2

EDWARD SHARPE AND THE MAGNETIC ZEROS, LULACRUZA

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) See My, What a Busy Week!, pg. 15.

GULFSONGS GULF COAST BENEFIT: CHRIS ROBLEY AND THE FEAR OF HEIGHTS, BUOY LARUE, RACHEL TAYLOR BROWN, LEONARD MYNX

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Between economic woes, faulty levees, the bloated head of Haley Barbour plastered on TV news, and BP's never-ending stream of oil, the Gulf of Mexico region has become the epicenter of nearly every major catastrophe this country has endured in recent memory. With their goal to "increase awareness of the human and environmental impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill," Gulfsongs Oregon understands this. Tonight will be your opportunity to donate to various gulf nonprofits by taking in a night of fine local music, capped by a performance from Chris Robley and the Fear of Heights, a warm-up show before they celebrate the release of Ghosts' Menagerie later this month. Consider this your good deed of the day, but unlike other noble deeds, you can drink during this one. EZRA ACE CARAEFF

THE PROTOMEN

(Mt. Tabor Theater, 4811 SE Hawthorne) Not many bands have played both Bonnaroo and the Penny Arcade Expo—indeed, Nashville's Protomen might be the sole recipient of that honor. With hearty doses of chiptune and '80s rock, the Protomen sing epic jams about the tribulations of Nintendo hero Mega Man, his creator Doctor Light, and his foe Doctor Wily—and in adapting our eight-bit hero from the world of classic gaming to that of concept albums, the Protomen also throw in a post-apocalyptic tale of ruinous robotic domination. (How jokey is all of this, you ask? It's probably best to let the choral hymns of "There will be light!" that're arranged alongside Ennio Morricone-ish refrains speak for themselves.) Videogame music can be a tricky thing, often relying more on nostalgia for retro-style bleeps and bloops than genuine talent and inventiveness, but the Protomen manage to have it both ways: This'll be a solid rock show for all, and one that'll be even better for those carrying DSes in their pockets. ERIK HENRIKSEN

FRIDAY 9/3

EDWARD SHARPE AND THE MAGNETIC ZEROS, LULACRUZA

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) See My, What a Busy Week!, pg. 15.

ALEXIS GIDEON

(Disjecta, 8371 N Interstate) See Music, pg. 17.

PAVEMENT, QUASI

(Edgefield, 2126 SW Halsey, Troutdale) See Music, pg. 18.

STRENGTH, FAKE DRUGS, DJ COPY, DJ PATRICIA FURPURSE

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Sweet justice! Strength have a new album, Mind-Reader, that is as sexy and dancey and silly as 2006's Going Strong, but this time around the guys have come even further into their own with fuller, slicker sounding tracks. Singer Bailey Winters exudes more confidence than ever with his sultry one-track-mind persona. John Ziegler has mastered his Casio, turning out richer synth melodies that feel both '80s and modern, but not in that annoying sardonic hipster kind of way. Patrick Morris continues to pluck out irresistible disco guitar hooks, providing the underlying funk that gets bodies gyrating. While you can clearly hear the band's progress on the new album, you really haven't experienced Strength until you've seen them live. The three are so at ease with their seductive, playful characters that you can't help but indulge in some arm waving and hip thrusting alongside them on the dance floor. AVA HEGEDUS

THE BUDOS BAND, THE UNIVERSAL DJ SECT

(Dante's, 1 SW 3rd) The Budos Band makes deep, bottom-heavy funk circa 1973, with groaning baritone sax, wah-wah-chink guitar, and percussion up the wazoo. The Staten Island band's newest, The Budos Band III, is the latest installment on their uniformly excellent discography on Daptone Records, and their live shows are sweaty masses of writhing funk-forms. But really, the best way to listen to the Budos Band is behind the wheel. As the pulse kicks in and the bass starts rumbling, you'll find your speedometer slowing to a crawl. The windows'll roll down, and you'll start eyeballing every street corner like you're a cop on the take or a hood out for vengeance. Before you know it, you're starring in your own gritty exploitation flick, and the Budos Band is there to soundtrack every minute of it. NED LANNAMANN

COBALT CRANES, THE WOOLEN MEN, NUCULAR AMINALS

(Plan B, 1305 SE 8th) As they cruised into Oregon on their first West Coast tour, Cobalt Cranes immediately Twittered, "What is the deal with the gas stations here?" Let's forgive the band's pompousness at the pump in order to enjoy their musical offerings. A foursome with a distinctly Los Angeles-tinged take on the fuzzy garage rock so prevalent these days, Cobalt Cranes' tracks sound slick despite stylized distortion and clashing cymbals. The Sonic Youth-esque male/female vocal split between drawling Tim Foley and honeyed Kate Betuel anchors their songs among the crunchy guitar of Mateo Leonardo and steady drumming from Danny Rossi. With recordings limited to tape compilations and a 7-inch released by French label Frantic City, Cobalt Cranes plan to self-release their upcoming EP in the Portland DIY style. That's how we do it up here. Just not when it comes to gas. MARANDA BISH

LYNYRD SKYNYRD

(Oregon State Fair, 2330 17th NE, Salem) Oh, Gary Rossington, why won't you just fucking die already? The last founding member of Lynyrd Skynyrd to take part in their current shameless right-wing incarnation is just a failed ticker away from finally closing the door on this (once great) band for good. But not even a Convair jet falling from the sky can stop Rossington, so the embarrassing scraps of Skynyrd get to wave the stars 'n' bars once more with a new record (Gods and Guns—take a guess what it's about), horrific new single ("That Ain't My America"–take a guess what it's about), and appearances at the Sean Hannity Freedom Concert (take a guess... oh, never mind). May zombie Ronnie Van Zant emerge from the soft soil of his Jacksonville grave and put an end to this nonsense forever. EAC

SATURDAY 9/4

NINTH ANNIVERSARY PARTY: JONNYX AND THE GROADIES , GUANTANAMO BAYWATCH, THE MEMORIES, BOOM, EDIBLES, TIMMY THE TERROR AND THE WINTER COATS, SEXHAIR, BILL PORTLAND

(The Artistery, 4315 SE Division) See My, What a Busy Week!, pg. 15.

SLAYER, MEGADETH, TESTAMENT, ANGELS OF BABYLON

(Washington County Fair Complex, 873 NE 34th, Hillsboro) See Music, pg. 17.

Little Beirut , HELLO MORNING

(The Secret Society, 116 NE Russell) Nearly every song on Fear of Heaven, the third album from Little Beirut, sounds to me like it should be on the radio. I don't mean that as a slight, either. Yes, there is plenty of garbage on the radio dial, to be sure, but Little Beirut—their moniker coming from Portland's nickname, coined by the staff of George Bush Sr. after he was greeted with protests on his visits to town—transcends the lowest-common-denominator dreck that makes up so much of rock radio. Their melodies sparkle and sheen with tightly composed arrangements, immaculate production, and consummate playing. "Nadia," in particular, is a perfect, triple-step pop song, and there's plenty more on Fear of Heaven—the kind of record that epitomizes the term "radio ready," if that phrase didn't imply so much rawk-block terror. So let's call it "listener ready," or perhaps say it's "great," and leave it at that. NL

SUNDAY 9/5

JENNY AND JOHNNY, LOVE AS LAUGHTER

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) At first glance, something about Jenny and Johnny makes my blood boil with hatred; could be the name, could be the tacky leather coat that Jonathan Rice wears in their press photos with a big blue "JOHNNY" emblazoned on the back. But after listening to a few tracks on their first release, I'm Having Fun Now, I find it hard to be resentful. My jaw slackens a bit when listening to the couple's voices blend over sanguine, classic pop riffs and both songwriting styles, while very different, complement each other in the best way possible—Jenny Lewis' verbose snapshots of life fare well with Rice's added introspection. Also, it's nice to see Lewis continue to prove herself more than just a radio queen riding Rilo Kiley's mainstream success; Jenny and Johnny's I'm Having Fun Now might find itself climbing the ranks and finding a seat alongside 2007's previously incomparable Rabbit Fur Coat. RAQUEL NASSER

THE BI-MARKS, DISCHARGE, AUTISTIC YOUTH, THE ESTRANGED

(Dunes, 1905 NE MLK) The Estranged are no strangers to Portland's punk scene, with members having done time in noteworthy acts including Remains of the Day and Warcry. Over the past couple of years the trio has let their moody aggression out through a handful of 7-inches and one terrific full-length. The Estranged is, of course, much more than just another ham-fisted punk act. Their latest Dirtnap release, The Subliminal Man, perfects the wiry guitar noise of previous efforts while allowing hooks to slice through—I get the feeling these guys have listened to the Plimsouls' Zero Hour EP. Rounding out tonight's bill are locals the Bi-Marks and Autistic Youth, both of which have firmly taken their place in the city's tried-and-true, DIY punk scene. Maximum rock 'n' roll, indeed. MARK LORE

SADISTIK, KID CALLED COMPUTER, KRISTOFF KRANE, CAS ONE, ALEXIPHARMIC, ABADAWN

(The Knife Shop at Kelly's Olympian, 426 SW Washington) Seattle emcee Sadistik and Chicago producer Kid Called Computer have recently joined forces and released The Art of Dying EP, their musical ode to film noir. Tracks "Bed of Flowers," "Black Rose," and "Wake up Dead," all allude to the fact that this is about as goth as hiphop gets, while thankfully refusing to delve into the cartoonish buffoonery that plagues the work of goth-rap "pioneer" Kung Fu Vampire. This is the final date on their West Coast tour, so the pair should be in top shape from performing night after night on the road. Portland emcee Abadawn has also been doing his fair share of touring recently, having just returned from a trip with Camobear labelmates the Chicharones. For those looking for the next wave of adventurous genre-bending NW hiphop, look no further. This is the place to be. RYAN FEIGH

MONDAY 9/6

DEAD CONFEDERATE, ALBERTA CROSS, FUTUREBIRDS

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) With the exception of Kings of Leon—and even pigeons hate them—there are not a whole lot of true-to-form alt-rock bands left. Hailing from a little city that knows plenty about music left of the dial, Athens rockers Dead Confederate aim to change all that. Absolutely mammoth in scale, Sugar is their latest, and this mighty alt-rock recording extends from behind the console (recorded by John Agnello, whose credits include Dinosaur Jr. and Sonic Youth) to a sound that would fit right in on the 1993 Lollapalooza lineup. While browsing their wares in the Doug Fir merch nook, the cover of Sugar might look a tad familiar—that's because it's exactly the same art as Rachel Taylor Brown's 7 Small Winter Songs EP from 2007. Just so you know. EAC

TUESDAY 9/7

THE CLIENTELE, LAY LOW, TCTB

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!, pg. 15.

THE RUMBLE: ONUINU, DALE EARNHARDT JR. JR., NORMAN

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Detroit's Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr. (Joshua Epstein and Daniel Zott) overcome their ridiculous name—NASCAR pandering (or mocking, even) is never a good look—with an endearing, chilled strain of country-tinged rock. But, thankfully, they're no My Morning Jacket/Band of Horses retreads. DEJJ work on a more intimate scale, as evidenced on their enjoyable Horse Power EP, while also flexing more interesting drum-machined rhythms than those two Americana-rock touchstones. The duo's dual-angelic-voxed songs strike a carefree note without being annoying about it—a difficult feat. A buzz band with a promising future, Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr. likely won't be playing a small venue like Holocene next time they come through town. DAVE SEGAL

WEDNESDAY 9/8

PANDA BEAR, DEVONWHO

(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!, pg. 15.

STLS, PALO VERDE, HOT VICTORY, ASSS, DJ JEN OLESEN, DJ NEW MOON PONCHO

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Kill Rock Stars is set to release Drumcore, the debut 7-inch from STLS, the all-drums duo of sts and former Explode into Colors drummer Lisa Schonberg. The pair plays standing, facing off on the venue floor, clattering their rolling drum patterns in perfect sync. But that's not the only 7-inch that's being released tonight, nor is it the only one with a surfeit of drums. The dueling drumkits of Hot Victory—Ben Stoller and Caitlin Love on the skins, plus Erik Hanson on the decks—is releasing a split single with Palo Verde, the sludge metal duo of Terrica Kleinknecht and Lauren K. Newman, both of whom are excellent drummers in their own right (although Kleinknecht tends to stick to equally thunderous guitar for the Palo Verde repertoire). Expect to get bashed and clobbered by all the drum action at tonight's show, and to come home with two new 7-inches (from three bands) under your battered arms. NL

MARK KOZELEK, TINY VIPERS

(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Mark Kozelek is a prick. But he's a loveable prick. While other soft-voiced troubadours flinch from the pain of it all, the motherfucking Koz just lives it, leaving countless torched bridges and fine recordings (under either his name, Red House Painters, or Sun Kil Moon) in his trembling wake. The template rarely changes—his records share a uniform look and rest on the same sedate level of volume—but on Sun Kil Moon's just-released Admiral Fell Promise Kozelek's love affair with classical guitar shows itself, along with his longstanding ability to floor you with just a single line from a song. But fair warning: You talk during his show, the man will fucking bury you. EAC

ARRINGTON DE DIONYSO'S MALAIKAT DAN SINGA, OHIOAN, DEATH SONGS, ZOE BOEKBINDER

(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) Your house burning to the ground is bad enough, especially when you're young, underpaid renters. When your house burns down containing most of the musical equipment that you use to perform and operate your indie record label, well, that's enough to crush anyone's spirit. Sadly this is what happened to Ohioan, a collective of Portland musicians headed by Ryne Warner, earlier this month. Tonight's show is a benefit for these individuals, and although drumming up funds to help out is important, a bit of rallying from the community will also be appreciated. Town crier of sorts Arrington de Dionyso—from Old Time Relijun and his Indonesian-speaking alter ego Malaikat dan Singa—will be playing as well as a very talented guest from California named Zoe Boekbinder, one-half of the incredible vaudeville show Vermillion Lies. MB

COLISEUM, BURNING LOVE, WARCRY, LEBANON, TEROKAL

(Satyricon, 125 NW 6th) Chris Colohan is the living embodiment of punk rock persistence. On a 2008 European tour with Cursed, what should have been one of the high points of his seven-year career with the Toronto hardcore band, Colohan announced that the band had been robbed and left stranded without passports or money. It was over. But Colohan got right back at it, with a lo-fi five-song demo with Burning Love. Though not quite as gloomy and dark as his previous efforts, the band gives all kinds of rock 'n' roll nods to Motörhead and early Black Flag. Kentucky-based headliners Coliseum are also no strangers to change; their newest LP, House with a Curse, steers away from the sometimes-draconian rule book of crust punk to embrace a little thing called melody. KEVIN DIERS