Up & Coming 

This Week’s Music Previews

FUTURE HISTORIANS Doug Fir, 6/20

FUTURE HISTORIANS Doug Fir, 6/20

THURSDAY 6/14

DARKDRIVECLINIC, WUSSY
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) Read our article on Wussy.

ETERNAL TAPESTRY, BLOOD BEACH, SWAHILI
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) Read our article on Eternal Tapestry.

BROWNISH BLACK, THE SATIN CHAPS, DJ DREW GROOVE
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Brownish Black.

LEMONADE, LE1F
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) In just a couple of short years, the soft, panacean sounds of chillwave have given way to something more brittle and MIDI'fied. Brooklyn trio Lemonade have tapped into that sometimes irritating-to-listen-to zeitgeist with Diver, their second album and one that offsets truly ghastly, cheesy synth tones with sugar-sweet songwriting. The result is something that echoes the tinny, harsh production of early-'90s mainstream pop—music, in other words, that most people would prefer to forget. Lemonade manages a few compelling, pretty moments within their rigid, swingless structure (particularly the Bobby Brown-cribbing album closer "Softkiss"), but most of the record remains surprisingly anonymous-sounding and whitebread. Not that it'll keep the band from amassing a huge following of fans who were just being born when this music was on the radio the first time around. NED LANNAMANN

SONNYMOON, JONTI, KNXWLEDGE, DOC ADAM
(Crown Room, 205 NW 4th) South African/Australian producer, vocalist, and multi-instrumentalist Jonti has an ear for pop music and a respect for the greats who've come before. It's no coincidence that Jonti and most of his better-known Stones Throw labelmates (J Dilla, Madlib, Mayer Hawthorne, James Pants, the Stepkids) are known to be avid record collectors. The one binding factor between their music is that they all re-purpose household, familiar styles and influences from the past to create something fresh and futuristic. Like others, Jonti samples records, but rather than directly recording and chopping a sample, he re-contextualizes the note progressions by recreating them on his vintage Moog Opus 3 synthesizer. This enables him to create dreamy soundscapes out of pop music, using hiphop production techniques for experimental and psychedelic sounds. Sharing the stage is Philadelphia beatsmith Knxwledge, and Sonnymoon, an intriguing Boston synth/R&B/pop duo. ROCHELLE HUNTER

HOW TO DRESS WELL, MY BODY, BABE RAINBOW
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) How to Dress Well, the musical alias of sometime philosopher Tom Krell, has become famous for his DIY rendering of 1990s soul. By turns transcendentally beautiful and harshly distorted, HTDW's earnest jams call to mind a Mr. Microphone as much as Boyz II Men. Interpreting R&B as ambient music and trading soulful harmonies for muddied lyrics strips most of the genre's sexy signifiers, so HTDW comes across as more of a romantic fantasy than the recounting of a bedroom reality. Like a cold shower, the aquatic-sounding production is partly responsible for this, but it's also what sets HTDW so far apart. On Love Remains, one song in particular sounds like a ballad sung by heartsick whales. It's called "My Body"—coincidentally the name of the opening band, who are about to transplant to Brooklyn. Tragically, this will be their last Portland show as Portlanders. REBECCA WILSON

QUEUED UP, PATAHA HISS, THEE FOUR TEENS
(Kelly's Olympian, 426 SW Washington) The genre power pop is applied to a ton of different bands these days, and plenty of them are way wussier than what Pete Townshend had in mind when he coined the term. Queued Up are not one of those bands. Their savage, jagged pop songs hark back to mid-'60s Who and Kinks, as well as their late-'70s resurrections, Dwight Twiley and the Jam. They're equally tuneful and aggressive, which is precisely what any group flaunting the power pop label ought to be. And while it may be thoroughly, spectacularly retro—the band wear matching, tight-fitting suits, hand business cards out at shows, and have a full-blown, borderline tawdry band logo—it seems to mostly come from an authentic place. I know it makes me wanna scream like it's 1964. MORGAN TROPER

MEMORY BOYS, FINGERS OF THE SUN, NEW CENTURY SCHOOLBOOK
(Record Room, 8 NE Killingsworth) Denver's Fingers of the Sun hark back to the fey, beauteous pop of cultish UK label Sarah Records' '80s roster. Their songs flow with easygoing cheerfulness tempered by an undercurrent of melancholy, balancing those opposing moods with balletic grace. Occasionally, Fingers of the Sun imbue their tunes with a sundowner'ed, psychedelic languidness—especially on "Careful with Those Sleeping Pills, Percy," a brilliant, 27-minute Pink Floyd homage/parody. DAVE SEGAL

FRIDAY 6/15

DOLLY PARTON HOOT NIGHT
(Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta) See My, What a Busy Week!

LOVERS, KAIA WILSON, THE GOLDEN BEARS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See My, What a Busy Week!, and read our article on Kaia Wilson.

QUIET MUSIC FESTIVAL: GROUPER, SONNY SMITH, SAM COOMES, CAROLYN PENNYPACKER RIGGS, DAN SASAKI
(Disjecta, 8371 N Interstate) Keep your voice down: It's the return of the Quiet Music Festival, which softly landed in Disjecta last year and now makes a hushed return for its second installment. A bevy of excellent acts—some who ordinarily keep things on the muted end of the audio spectrum, and some who certainly don't—have all agreed to turn down the volume knob for two full nights. The acts that festival curator Chris Johanson has assembled are impressive in any capacity, including several of Portland's finest (Grouper and Sam Coomes on Friday; Scout Niblett and Ural Thomas on Saturday) plus others from down the coast (Sonny Smith, Vetiver, others). It'll be a remarkable two days that won't leave your ears ringing. NL

MOJAVE BIRD, BEN DARWISH
(Graeter Art Gallery, 131 NW 2nd) Mojave Bird is the solo musical endeavor of Portland's Grace Peters. Her chilling yet comforting voice holds you in suspense as it drifts in and out of layers of cool, drawn-out, ambient synth loops and bright piano sounds. Since releasing her debut EP, You Animal People, on Bandcamp, Peters has been making waves in the local music community. Don't be surprised if you find out she's your favorite Portland artist's favorite Portland artist. Tonight she'll be sharing the space with composer/pianist Ben Darwish for her monthly, free residency at downtown's Graeter Art Gallery, which continues through September. RH

ROSE BENT, THE LOVE LOUNGERS
(Mt. Tabor Theater, 4811 SE Hawthorne) Attend enough hiphop shows, and you'll eventually witness an act who demands more energy from the crowd than they themselves are willing to commit. Sure, there might be a small contingent waving their hands like they just don't care, but it's born of apathy rather than elation; quite frankly, it's a pathetic sight. Luckily, you'll never encounter that during a Rose Bent show, because the three local ladies who make up the group know what it means to be entertainers. High-energy choreography and an effusive performance style command all but the most staid wallflowers up to the front of the stage to get down with the group. Tonight finds Rose Bent releasing their latest mixtape, Crimson Skies, which features DJ Sneakers and builds upon their excellent 2010 debut. The Love Loungers, Portland's premier "groove-hop" outfit, are also celebrating a new album of their own. RYAN FEIGH

SATURDAY 6/16

QUIET MUSIC FESTIVAL: LICHENS, VETIVER, SCOUT NIBLETT, URAL THOMAS, KEVIN THOMSON, STRAWBERRY SMOG
(Disjecta, 8371 N Interstate) See Friday's listing.

GHOST ANIMAL, GRAVE BABIES, NIGHTMARE FORTRESS, ASSS
(East End, 203 SE Grand) Last year, Ghost Animal was featured in the Pacific Northwest edition of an online video series sponsored by JanSport (of backpack fame) called Practice Space, which showcases hip bands in their alleged elements. Ghost Animal's segment was filmed (by Lance Bangs!) in their studio at Reed College, with Marisa Rowland and Michael Avishay discussing the literary and sonic influences of their fledgling efforts. They strike me as an interesting choice to represent the PNW, not yet having released an album, but they make a strong impression with an aesthetic swerve and a setlist that includes ballsy covers of New Order and Black Tambourine. Their promising start has evolved into an intriguing project, marked by Avishay's articulate guitar reverberations, Rowland's unflinching percussion, and an eerie, twin-pronged vocal approach heard on their latest track, "Dreaming of Love and Death Part I," a frenetic, pulsing exultation of a song. MARANDA BISH

UNKNOWN MORTAL ORCHESTRA, RELIGIOUS GIRLS, HUSTLE AND DRONE
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) A groovy bass line and falsetto have become the Ray-Ban Wayfarers of stylish bands, an accoutrement slapped on for the sole purpose of looking cool. Which is too bad, because when used properly—with a bizarre sense of experimentation, for example—nothing sounds better than funk. It's already been a year since Unknown Mortal Orchestra's first album was released, and despite the self-deprecating modifier, Ruban Nielson of Portland (formerly of New Zealand) has become very much known for his weird, lo-fi funk tunes with beats that stand out in front. UMO is best known for catchy singles like "Ffunny Ffriends," but I like them most at their weirdest, when they sound like nothing so much as the recently, tragically disbanded Ween. Like Dean and Gene, Nielson knows how to push the boundaries of the unexpected and experimental, while never sacrificing enjoyability. RW

LARRY YES AND THE TANGLED MESS, TOUSSAINT PERRAULT, MANGAS
(Kenton Club, 2025 N Kilpatrick) I'm of the mindset that where you've been isn't as important as where you're headed, but it's important to mention the path that Larry Yes has traveled en route to tonight's album release. As a youth in '90s Portland, Yes cut his teeth at the X-Ray Cafe, our town's original all-ages incubator for music creation and community. From then to now, Larry Yes has not stopped making music—as a member of myriad projects and as a leader of troupes such as tonight's Tangled Mess, which celebrates the release of new album The Next Wave of Omnigalactic Peace Warriors. Yes' distinctive and endearing drawl leads a veritable orchestra of instruments and hearty voices in playful, pleasing ruminations on love and the nature of being, all of which resonate soundly with the joy of putting fingers to strings, mouths to microphones, and making music in order to most fully live in your time and place, even as it ceaselessly evolves. As Yes sings: "If there's a time, it's now, so take it"—oddly enough, echoing the sentiments of his namesake, UK proggers Yes, and their own "Time and Word." MB

SUNDAY 6/17

JOHN FOGERTY
(Edgefield, 2126 SW Halsey) Look, I don't care if you think you're sick to death of evergreens like "Bad Moon Rising" and "Fortunate Son." Nor do I care that John Fogerty looks like an old lesbian now. The man is simply one of the finest American songwriters to ever grace this earth—I'm talking Stephen Foster, George Gershwin, Woody Guthrie level. If you don't believe me, take yet another listen to Chronicle, that flawless, 20-track summation of Creedence Clearwater Revival's stunningly short career (four years!), and simply the greatest "greatest hits" disc ever pressed to metal, or plastic, whatever the fuck CDs are made out of. (If your local doesn't have Chronicle in the juke, raise a fuss.) Just ask the Dude: Creedence is where it's at. John Fogerty's performing tonight, and all of Oregon should be excited. After all, this is the man responsible for not one, but two of the best songs about rain ever written. NL

LOW TIMES, EETS FEATS, STILL CAVES, BATH PARTY, BAD ENGLISH
(East End, 203 SE Grand) Low Times write compact, slightly sinister garage-rock songs that sneakily insinuate themselves into your bloodstream. Their music has a ramschackle urgency and coiled thrust that will probably translate into even more exciting sounds in East End's subterranean space. Fans of the Intelligence, Ty Segall, and Night Beats should become enamored of Low Times. DS

JAIL WEDDINGS, FATHER FIGURE
(Rontoms, 600 E Burnside) Jail Weddings are a beautiful train wreck: a traveling rock 'n' roll carnival from Los Angeles with a dangerously romantic shot of soul. At the Jail Weddings shows I've attended, people tend to drink heavily, dance recklessly, and make out (sometimes with strangers). The band has around a dozen members, though the numbers fluctuate, and lots of instruments: horns, guitars, and killingly gorgeous lady backup singers. Singer, bandleader, and trickster-in-chief Gabriel Hart says he chose his bandmates for their personalities as much as for their artistry. Jail Weddings have plenty of both. Maybe too much for their own good: One of their iconic early songs, a soulful ballad that's part Buddy Holly and part Stax Records, is titled "I Am Fucking Crazy." That's not hyperbole. BRENDAN KILEY

MONDAY 6/18

MOUNT EERIE, KEY LOSERS
(Back Door Theater, 4319 SE Hawthorne) Once upon a time, I was dragged to Olympia by some friends for a Mount Eerie show, before I knew anything about Phil Elverum or his music. The venue, a visibly and fittingly eerie deteriorating log cabin in the outskirts of town, was condemned, and the show was consequently cancelled. I was disappointed. Pissed, even—only more so once I returned and actually sat down and listened to Elverum's recordings as the Microphones (his previous moniker) and Mount Eerie. What pensive and poignant art this guy creates, with a musical palette so startlingly diverse, from murmured, gently plucked acoustic numbers to snarling, faux black metal. The common thread is that it's always interesting, and a lot of the time catchy, too (as if the two were incompatible). Mount Eerie is atmospheric pop music that is—brace yourselves—quintessentially Pacific Northwest. MT Also see My, What a Busy Week!

TERRY MALTS, PERMANENT COLLECTION
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) San Francisco's Terry Malts rightfully draw comparisons to the Ramones (see especially "I Do"), but the resemblance occurs in sonics only. There's no cartoon aesthetic here, and there's a tunefulness and raggedness in the guitars and tones that Queens' godfathers of punk never employed. What's more, Terry Malts' songs are so much damn fun to listen to that you might as well just turn it up and say fuck-all to that whole debate anyway. It's okay to love 'em both. GRANT BRISSEY

AAN, SUPPORT FORCE, GENDERS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Just to let you know, it's awesome free local show season. Here's another! Sunny psychedelic pop sensations Aan will make you smile and wanna hold hands and stuff. What started as Bud Wilson's solo project turned into a full-fledged, SXSW-going, touring, recording, show-playing band! They have a new record on the way, called Amor Ad Nauseum, and their new track, "I Don't Need Love," is up on End Hits. Meanwhile, Support Force plays post-rock with intricate guitar workings that will mess with your head even more than Jonathan Magdaleno's introspective, thoughtful lyrics. And Genders is, to the naked eye, not too far off from recently defunct band Youth, minus one of the lead singers and most of their songs. The style remains similar, though: lo-fi, beachy rock 'n' roll with singer Maggie Morris providing beautiful melodies over the top. It's summer! Let's go to the pool! I mean... Mississippi Studios. RH

TUESDAY 6/19

MOUNT EERIE, KEY LOSERS
(Valentine's, 232 SW Ankeny) See My, What a Busy Week!, and Monday's listing.

RIVER CITY EXTENSION, THE DROWNING MEN, MY AUTUMN'S DONE COME
(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) I can't say if those scruffy youngsters in River City Extension have been taking careful notes on the Portland music scene from their home all the way across the country in Toms River, New Jersey. But they've got certain things dialed in perfectly: a dizzingly large, coed lineup; a sound that cheerfully and expertly swerves from delicate, plucky folk to soaring, anthemic chorale to shit-kicking twang; a name that could be cribbed from one of our city's lesser-used nicknames. How can this not be a Portland band? Don't Let the Sun Go Down on Your Anger (see, even that earnest title could've been devised right here) is the eight-piece's tremendously good second record, and it's got a secret bullet that many of the best Portland bands can't pull off: that swaying, midnight-drunk, hoarse, Springsteen-y passion that could come only from the Garden State. River City Extension is a terrific band, and the wonderful Don't Let the Sun Go Down on Your Anger is a record that deserves to be listened to for a long, long time. Portland—and the rest of the world—is going to love it. NL

WEDNESDAY 6/20

MONKEY TRICK, 1-2 BUCKLE MY SHOE
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) See My, What a Busy Week!

FUTURE HISTORIANS, DESERT NOISES, THE WORLD RADIANT
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Listening to Future Historians' new album makes me envy anyone with a domestic gas guzzler, deep pockets, and a happy ignorance of the impending environmental catastrophe. Just in time for road-trip season, Somehow It Is Now features big songs for a big landscape, broken only by two sun-drenched lanes of highway. It's rocking enough to keep you awake at the wheel, but the tradeoff might be an existential crisis. The cymbals and twangy electric guitar on "This House Don't Rattle" call to mind desert spaces, but the chilling, close harmonies remind you that you're all alone out there: "I tried to run, I tried to hide/I tried to stand my ground and fight/I lost a step, I fell behind/I lost my nerve and fell in line." Frontman Dave Shur has earned his reputation as a master of sad lyrics and happy music. RW

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