Up & Coming 

THURSDAY 6/14

FRANK FURTER AND THE HOT DOGS, RACINGSTRIPE, SPREAD EAGLE, TOURETTES

(Berbati's) There's a certain, corny kind of humor that gets me right in the heart. It's one step dumber than camp, and it incorporates the jokes of sixth grade with stupid, over-the-top ridiculousness. Example: the stickers your piano teacher had that said "AWESOME" with a thumbs-up drawing. If movies like Police Academy make you chortle ironically, then you HAVE to see Frank Furter and the Hot Dogs. Natron (the Natrons) dresses up in a big hot dog suit and sings blues songs about how he realized his lady was cheating on him because he found "condiments." Get it? Condiments! It's hee-larious! JULIANNE SHEPHERD

THE GOSSIP, THOSE PEABODYS, CAPTAIN VS. CREW

(Meow Meow) Instead of an instrument, Beth from the Gossip plays her hips and rattling personality. The last Gossip show I saw had her out in the audience--without a trace of irony--shimmying around, grabbing people, and forcing the crowd to clap and sway as though we were all at a revival. And we were at a revival of sorts. This young woman--with her huge, rich, soulful voice--is a badass, and coupled with the band's easy, bluesy, garage-by-numbers sound, the Gossip puts on a very good time. JEFF DeROCHE

BANTAM ROOSTER, FIREBALLS OF FREEDOM, 10-4 BACKDOOR, LOS FEDERALES

(Satyricon) One of the main problems and joys of contemporary blues-garage rock is that its purveyors often confuse a "vintage sound" with an impenetrable, omnipresent crappy guitar amp. Another problem is that whiny rich white guy, Jon Spencer, kind of fucked it up for everybody. However, Detroit's Bantam Rooster is able to transcend most of these obstacles (amplifiers notwithstanding). They're a charismatic duo producing tons of noise and honest-to-goodness blues-trash, and it works; the music's not unlike labelmates the White Stripes, but with a little more whisky-gospel and humidity. Though they've primarily been a word-of-mouth band since their debut in 1996, their new album on Sympathy for the Record Industry (Fuck Y'All, released in April) should change that. You should see them before they earn enough money to buy better amps. JS


FRIDAY 6/15

FOETUS, BROOKLYN SOLIPSIST SOCIETY

(Cobalt) In its many incarnations since 1978, Foetus has been the project of Jim Thirlwell, a lunatic genius whose sound experiments with industrial electronics, no wave noise, and even big band perversions, made him an iconoclastic figure--even in the cultural underground of extreme music. Flow, his first studio album in five years, lives up to his eclectic style, even featuring a couple of mutant pop songs ("The Need Machine") and some twisted bossa nova on "Cirrhosis of the Heart." After nearly a quarter-century with Foetus, Thirlwell may be evolving into a parody of himself--but that's when he's most unpredictable. DAVID SLATTON

SYSTEMWIDE, NAPBOULE, QUI-VAH, MIKE CRENSHAW & PANIC PROJECT

(Berbati's) Portland's Systemwide stands out as a band that performs with the contagious joy of true musical enthusiasts. The vocalist, Ezra, plays children's instruments and finger cymbals with wild abandon, spraying sweat and spit into the audience with his dancing contortions. The reverb, echo effects, and S-dub's samples and turntabling support the guts of the operation: mind-blowing drumming, solid bass, and well-placed dissonant keys that combine to create a rich, intense, and aggressive dub sound. Go to the show, since Systemwide doesn't represent as well on CD. TAMARA LARSON

STAN MCMAHON BAND, PHAMOUS PHACES

(Medicine Hat) For anyone with an ear inclined toward old-fashioned guitar pop, this show promises to be an exercise in sweet-tooth indulgence. The Stan McMahon Band is a bunch of surly old geezers specializing in tangy melodies and wafting, fab harmonies that should momentarily overcome your hard-chiseled cynicism and bruised self-esteem to allow a little love-light into that igloo heart. Trust me, they're good for what ails you. Phamous Phaces is a pack of power-pop executioners in smart clothes: Cheap Trick in a time machine sent back into the past to infiltrate Tommy James and the Shondells. This is the night where you finally get up the nerve to ask Miss Simmons, your groovy English teacher, to dance. And she will. JOHN CHANDLER


SATURDAY 6/16

GOTH SKATE WITH ROMULUS, REMUS, OPHELIA

(Hillsboro Skateworld, 503-640-1333) Rollerskating is perhaps the least traditionally gothic thing I can think of, but then again, when the internet hit, goths branched out into all sorts of subsects. So, if you're a "glittergoff," or just a fan of rollerskating and the Unenviable Darkness of Life, strap on your skates and get your Bauhaus on! JS

ORIGAMI, SARAH DOUGHER, THE DIMES

(Meow Meow) Rhonda Simmons left Australia's excellent Ninety-Nine to form Origami, a band with soothing, pretty harmonies and a tableau of unique guitar notework not usually associated with music you might call "indiepop." Their first full-length, Measure Up (on Japan's BabyRoo Records), is definitely a debut, but it's a strong one, with ethereal vocals and prolific quirks. Complete with elegant chanteuse Sarah Dougher and rainy keyboard popsters The Dimes! JS See Music Bio pg 27

SPAIN, SARAH FERRAL, MIRANDA LEE RICHARDS

(Cobalt Lounge) Tonight is a night of divine sadness. Prepare for music at a slow tempo, with Spain's tear-stained odes to fleeting joy and Miranda Lee Richards filling the hole where new Mazzy Star and Sundays records should be. It's a bill tailor-made for smooth drinks and dark clothes. I even hear that this Sarah Ferral person is not who she pretends to be, and is someone altogether more cosmic, a familiar friend from beyond the stars. But then, I've said too much already... JAMIE S. RICH

KOOL KEITH

(Crystal Ballroom) Kool Keith is probably one of the most prolific potty-mouths in hiphop, punctuating his menacing, muted beats with "fuck you and your mom, mutherfucka," way more than you think is possible to say in one minute. Until his last album, Spankmaster, he could pretty much hold these vocabulary choices together with tight, tight vocals, but unfortunately, he has now spiraled into a bunch of lame-ass swear words that sound ridiculous with lazy beats. Let's hope he can pull it together live. KATIA DUNN

MATES OF STATE

(Jackpot Records, 39th and Hawthorne, noon, free) It feels weird having to say it, because they should be as famous as any mainstream band, but Mates of State create the most terminally catchy, danceable, organ/drums/harmonies in the entire world. Yes, they are a one-trick pony, but if their music was pumped into elevators, the prozac industry would topple like the house of cards it is. Even if you can't make it to this show, listen to their record, My Solo Project (Omnibus). You'll be happier for it. JS

RIVER CITY REBELS, DARKBUSTER, THE RUNAWAY BOYS, AT A GLANCE

(Fallout Shelter, 400 W Evergreen Blvd, Vancouver, WA) Like their '77 elders, Boston's River City Rebels (Victory Records) play political punk and name their songs things like, "Fuck You," and "The System." You've heard their music a million times before by a million other bands, but there's a reason this show is at an all-ages venue: As a hard-and-fast rule, dissatisfaction with society will always affect the kids, and punk rock ignites that. This show isn't about music--it's about excitement. JS

JOHN BUTCHER, MATTHEW SPERRY, GINO ROBAIR

(Community Music Center, 3350 SE Francis St) As with 99.99 percent of the shows the Creative Music Guild holds, this world-renowned improvisational trio (saxophones, bass, percussion, bows, e-bows, faux dax, etc) will be sophisticated and abstract yet incredibly musical, communicating ideas and feeling through whatever happens to come out of their well-learned instruments. Go, and fill the space left by your presence. JS


SUNDAY 6/17

SONNA, GUESTS

(Meow Meow) The last week or two slathered Portland music lovers with a heaping helping of instrumental madness (Tortoise, Mogwai, Calexico)--it suddenly seems like brain music is in vogue. If you've realized that these pleasant, vocal-free, springtime interludes have been putting a bigger smile on your face than the average late-night, drunk-ass bar band at Satyricon, then continue the magic with Baltimore's Sonna. Intricate, polyrhythmic drums intertwine with dueling lush guitars and dark and dirty bass. Taking their cues from the early days of Brian Eno to the more recent forays into ambient by Aerial M, Sonna weaves a plush sonic world that bitch-slaps the senses while smugly teasing the mind. A.J. ROSE

CHAMBER STRINGS, THE FRINGE, THE HOLIDAYS

(Medicine Hat) Perhaps best known for his work with the Rosehips and Epic Soundtracks, Kevin Junior is bringing his catch-all, retro pop project the Chamber Strings to the Medicine Hat. Wearing their influences like badges of honor--bluesy like the Stones, layered like the Beatles--the Chamber Strings write bright, addictive, near-perfect pop songs. Though they're not breaking any new ground, these roots are tried and very true. JEFF DeROCHE

CLARENCE "GATEMOUTH" BROWN

(Aladdin) It can be safely said without hyperbole that Gatemouth Brown is one of the most influential musicians to ever come out of Texas. Although primarily associated with blues guitar, his stylistic explorations have delved into jazz, country, calypso, all with virtuosic accompaniment by harmonica, vocals, and even mandolin. His late '40s-early '50s recordings for Peacock remain to this day as some of the most seminal ever released by a blues guitarist, while 1999's American Music, Texas Style found a nice bridge between hard bop and more down-home styles. Although well into his 70s, Gatemouth can be expected to (metaphorically) burn down the house tonight. MURRAY CIZON


MONDAY 6/18

BEATNUTS W/GREG NICE, SWOLLEN MEMBERS, CHECKMATE, PRIMERO, BLES & B-BOY BATTLE

(Crystal) Too many hiphop shows feature moments that are little more than a group of men screaming into microphones over a formless, pounding blaring from shit-sound speakers. However, the last time I saw the Beatnuts, they were well above average, performing catchy chant-along numbers to an enthusiastic crowd. Then Greg Nice ran out on stage, an exhilaratingly visceral, whipcrack beat tore through the speakers, and Greg launched into "Sometimes I Rhyme Slow (Sometimes I Rhyme Quick)." The room's intensity shot up a thousand levels, as Greg Nice demonstrated what it means to be a true Mic Controller. With the crowd pressed firmly into the palm of his hand, he began beatboxing. Greg Nice is the shit. STEPHEN STRAUSBAUGH


TUESDAY 6/19

SOILENT GREEN, ISIS, WITCH MOUNTAIN, YOB

(Pine Street) See Music pg 17

DAHLIA CD RELEASE PARTY

(Ohm) After two years of honing their chops as Portland's premier electronic duo, Dahlia has finally taken their brand of inspired electronic and put it to disc. Keith Schreiner's rich soundscapes groove and undulate, treading similar water as Moby and Portishead's Andy Smith. Jennifer Folker's voice strikes a stunning balance between angelic and soulful, while being stretched, sugar coated and alien-ized by effects god Jay Bozich. Tonight's show will add both turntablist DJ Izm and the trumpet of Derek Simms to their live mix. Best of all, Dahlia's debut CD, Emotion Cycles, will finally be available to their loyal acolytes for the purchasing. If you are in the know, you'll be there, but if you are new to the cosmic glory hole that is Dahlia, catch them at their celebratory best before they rise to the top and take over the world--it's gonna happen. A.J. ROSE

LAST OF THE JUANITAS, BOTTLED OG, VIDA BLUE, THE PLAN THE

(Ash Street) I've gotta give props to Vida Blue 'cause they're from Iowa City, IA, which is where I went to school and enjoyed the drunkest, most insane days of my life--and of course, they're a good band. Their guitar jams actually remind me of their bill mates, the Juanitas--kind of sloppy, but with some indefinable order. The singer yells like a mental patient, yet blends in well with their heavy sound, and doesn't make you want to tear your hair out. Bottled Og is pretty fucking amazing, with their blend of noise rock, tight guitar riffs, and affected Violent Femmes-type vocals. They're doing something different, and actually doing it well, which is always to be appreciated. Along with stud muffins The Planet The, this show is the sleeper hit of the week. KATIE SHIMER


WEDNESDAY
6/20

NEBULA, CHERRY VALENCE, BURNING BRIDES

(Satyricon) With song titles like "To The Center," and "Fields of Psilocybin," you know what you've gotta hit before you go see Nebula, mutha. Two members of Fu Manchu lend stoner cred to Nebula's psychedelic '70s retro rock, laying down chug-a-chug fuzzed-out guitars over mad, smashing, Metallica-style drums. Vocalist Eddie Glass goes from sounding like Roger Waters to Axl Rose-style wailings. Nebula's newest album, Charged (Sub Pop), keeps the testosterone cranked up: the song "Do It Now" actually sounds like a heavy metal paean to Viagra, with lyrics like, "It's my medicine... let's do it!" TRACI VOGEL


GOING TO SEATTLE?

Fri 6/15: Olympia Experimental Music Festival (Midnight Sun, Olympia); Spain, The Swords Project, Miranda Lee Richards (Crocodile)

Sat 6/16: Bright Eyes, Mates of State (Showbox); Foetus (Graceland)

Tues 6/19: Little Richard (EMP)

Wed 6/20: Iron Butterfly, Big Brother & the Holding Company, Quicksilver Messenger Service, Ray Manzarek (EMP); Stacey Earle (Tractor Tavern)

For more info, visit

www.thestranger.com

New Releases June 19: American Steel, Banco de Gaia, Beans*, Belle and Sebastian, Gregg Bendian's Interzone, Bitter Springs, Bonny Billy, Built to Spill, David Candy (Ian Svenonius), Clem Snide, Chicago Underground Quartet*, Chitlin' Fooks, Clark & Ware, The Clean*, F Minus, Gangsta Boo, Rebecca Gates*, Simon Joyner*, David Kilgour*, Ted Leo*, Ministry, Mystic, Prodigy, Radio Birdman*, Shins, Slicker, Spacer, Stars, Summer Hymns, Swell, Nobukazu Takemura*, Truman's Water*

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