THURSDAY 5/1

STEPHEN MALKMUS & THE JICKS, THE JOGGERS

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) See My, What a Busy Week!.

SONS & DAUGHTERS, BODIES OF WATER

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See Music Feature.

EAT SKULL, NAKED ON THE VAGUE, INCA ORE, LITTLE CLAW

(Twilight Café and Bar, 1420 SE Powell) Eva Salaens of Inca Ore spent the rainy winter here in Portland, but she'll be moving back to Oakland before spring fully breaks, so this could be your last opportunity for a while to catch her experimental, murky soundscapes. It's fitting that she's leaving before the sun has a chance to come out; her spooky latest record, Birthday of Bless You, sounds like the Blade Runner soundtrack as performed underwater by a pod of whales. Liquid synths are poured like slabs of concrete, then given a chance to harden as columns and girders of breathy voice are constructed on top. There are other Inca Ore projects in the pipeline, too, including a split vinyl release with Liz Harrison from Grouper that originally saw light last year as a self-released cassette, a brand-new Inca Ore CD-R called Ballet Shop, and Salaens' new zine, Birthday. NED LANNAMANN Also, see My, What a Busy Week!.

CRYPTACIZE, THE DEAD SCIENCE, GHOST TO FALCO

(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) Nedelle Torrisi and Chris Cohen alternate lead vocal duties for California's Cryptacize, and their respective approaches help characterize what makes this trio noteworthy. Torrisi's guileless yearning gives the band an at-times theatrical feeling, while Cohen's drier delivery and Morricone-ready guitar lines shift the territory from stage lights to Cinemascope. On their debut, Dig That Treasure, they literally invoke transcendence at certain points ("Cosmic Sing-a-long" and "Heaven Is Human"), and there's also a sparse, discernible silence hovering behind the music that they make. It's the rush to overcome this that ultimately makes the band's songs as compelling as they are, lending a greater gravity to their offbeat pop sensibility. TOBIAS CARROLL

FRIDAY 5/2

VETIVER, KELLEY STOLTZ, THE BATTLE OF LAND & SEA

(Roseland Grill, 10 NW 6th) Vetiver's survival of the buzz wave from San Francisco's freak-folk scene has finally yielded some much-deserved ballyhoo. The band's upcoming all-covers album, Thing of the Past, briskly braises Dead-esque jam leads in woven tapestries of murky folk rock. Vocalist Andy Cabic (also a member of Devendra Banhart's band) is a natural frontman, all spastic and enchanting, and it comes through even when the band branches off to tap into others' songs (material from Hawkwind, Bobby Charles, and Biff Rose is featured, among others). There's a tenderness to even their most brazen tunes, and an undeniable '70s vibe permeates almost every pore of their sound—not as a detriment, but as badge of authenticity. Expect to laugh, cry, mourn, and sway in elation all in one set—that's a pretty potent concoction. RYAN J. PRADO Also, see My, What a Busy Week!.

EL CERDO, JONNY X & THE GROADIES, TRANSIENT, FLYING FORTRESS

(Satyricon, 125 NW 6th) There was a time when being hardcore meant applying faith (pick a political issue!) to fury (now scream!). Metalcore arrived later, fortified with high-flying pit moves, chugga-chugga groove, and human growth hormone (now flex!). Hardcore has somehow defined both Minor Threat and Hatebreed, and—judging by Vancouver, WA's El Cerdo—it has made itself very sick in the process. Three of El Cerdo's four dudes burp out low, sour bile all over their crusty new full-length, Our Bellies Sluggish with Goat Meat. "Infestation of Man" is the biggest mouthful, with each member trying to out man-sick the other. Try it at home yourself: Stick your finger down your throat (now puke!). You've just made punk a threat again. MIKE MEYER

VHS OR BETA, ANOTHER CYNTHIA, TIGERCITY

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) VHS or Beta have come a long way since the French-inflected instrumental disco of Le Funk; they're now a full-fledged mainstream pop/rock band similar to the Stills or the Killers, and the Louisville, Kentucky, electro-popsters are returning for their third Doug Fir appearance since September. They're still touring behind last year's Bring on the Comets, a pleasant, '80s-skewed pop album that's equal parts Duran Duran and Simple Minds. Album highlights "Can't Believe a Single Word" and "Bring on the Comets" are over-inflated but affirming anthems ready-made for the sports arena, and having just come off a Coachella performance, they'll strive to make the Doug Fir seem larger than life. Sure, the formats of VHS and Betamax are both irrelevant now, but the band's music is a harmless, danceable nostalgia trip. NL

KELLY BLAIR BAUMAN, TERRORBIRD

(Towne Lounge, 714 SW 20th Pl) Northern California expatriate Kelly Blair Bauman gained notoriety as a seething and gifted songwriter in such varied groups as Deathstar, the Arnica Sync, and the North Magnetic before hoofing it up to the Pacific Northwest. Whereas his output in his former bands relished in layering excitingly moody guitar swells with subtle vocals and raucous rhythmic undertones, his latest offering (new album Gomorrah on Jealous Butcher Records) floats on seas of dreamy, rustic Americana. Bauman's affinity for layering many melodies is still prevalent, but it's deepened by an impossible knack for timeless song craft and plaintive sonic experimentalism. There's a dash of Jackson Browne's elegant storytelling belied by brooding electric guitar, cello, and saloon-y piano inserts (as evidenced on "Elevator Up"), all hammered home with undulating vocal cadences. It's an understatement to say Bauman is one of—if not the—most underrated songwriters in Portland; visit his world of sound and see. RJP

TOM WAITS TRIBUTE: ADRIAN H & THE WOUNDS, AMOREE LOVELL, BABYDOLLARS, GARETT BRENNAN

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) The appeal of a tribute to an artist like Tom Waits lies in the fact that the raspy-voiced singer has barked out a lengthy career with a wide swing in style and substance. So when you honor the reclusive Waits, which singer are you paying tribute to? The sincere balladeer from his sweet folk San Diego pizza-slingin' days? The whiskey-fueled malcontent stomps of Heartattack and Vine? What about the post-Beefheart experimentation of the Kathleen Brennan era? No matter which you choose, just do a better job than Scarlett Johansson and you'll be fine. EZRA ACE CARAEFF

SATURDAY 5/3

LIVE BAND VS. OHMEGA WATTS, REV. SHINES, KID SHILO

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!.

COLIN MELOY, LAURA GIBSON

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) See My, What a Busy Week!.

LAURA VEIRS, LIAM FINN, LET'S GO SAILING

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Now that she is a Portland resident, Laura Veirs' precious folk songs are all the more relatable, and her approachable persona (one which blogs about a quilting workshop and how she is "pumped about making quilts") feels right at home in our crafty little home. Bring some extra cash for the bespectacled Veirs, since she is selling a limited-edition tour EP of covers, Two Beers Veirs, which includes a gorgeous take on the old-timey classic "Wildwood Flower." Joining her is Liam Finn, who is trying to rock away from the shadow of his famous father (Neil Finn of Crowded House), and the intelligent pop stylings of Let's Go Sailing. EAC

CAGUAMA, SASSPARILLA, BAD MITTEN

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) Fronted by guitarist/vocalist Raul Ugalde, Caguama makes authentic bar-band Latin rock. Sung entirely in Spanish, the band runs a wide variety of styles, with bassist Freddy Trujillo providing harmony vocals and Antoine Erhardt on drums (both songwriters in their own right). Punky electric numbers sit alongside corrido waltzes, and standard norteño-inflected songs are balanced by trippy, acoustic desert wails. It would be easy to compare it to Los Lobos—maybe not entirely 100 percent accurate, but easy. So you might as well skip the Cinco de Mayo Festival at the Waterfront this weekend (where Caguama are also playing on Friday). A late night spent drinking and dancing to Caguama is bound to be the more authentic experience anyway. NL

WEINLAND, A WEATHER

(White Eagle, 836 N Russell) The lone Portland stop on Weinland's all-McMenamins mini-tour (four stops in four days) finds the band tucked away at the White Eagle, perhaps a bit bloated from all the onion rings and pints of Hammerhead they'll be getting on the house. Here's hoping you didn't sleep on their gorgeous and introspective La Lamentor, an album of softly strummed beauty and whispered agony. Along for the ride is the shuffling bedroom folk of A Weather, fresh on the heels of Cove, an album which joins La Lamentor atop the list of best local releases this year. EAC

WANDA JACKSON, MARSHALL SCOTT WARNER, THEE HEADLINERS

(Dante's, 1 SW 3rd) Last time I saw Wanda Jackson live, she blew through this rainy town like a hurricane. I felt like I was in a time capsule that flashed back to the days of swing dancing and beer that could be traded for pocket change—an era where pin-up girls revealing their garter belts was considered controversial and sexually defiant. Wanda Jackson was singing at those parties back then and still has the same spitfire prowess to get a party started in the new millennium. As she enters her 70s, it's refreshing to see a woman rocking past retirement and warming her throne as the "Queen of Rockabilly." Take her advice and "Rock Your Baby All Night Long," because you don't want to miss your chance before Ms. Jackson takes a one-way ticket to the eternal rock 'n' roll party in the sky. EM BROWNLOWE

24-HOUR CONCERT VIBE ZONE: STRATEGY, THE ETERNAL NOW JAMM SQUAD PDX

(Hippodrome Circus Arts Center, 315 SE 3rd) Are most shows not long enough for you? Well, how about a concert that goes all night? And all day? And all night again? This rare 24-hour concert will take place inside an installed "vibe zone" within Hippodrome and acts as a double release party for a pair of new discs on Audio Dregs: Strategy's Music for Lamping and the Ambient Not Not Ambient compilation. And if that isn't enough, there will also be the comically large all-star band—er, "Jamm Squad"—that features members of over 70 bands(!) and some of those psychedelic projections the kids are crazy about these days. After the show, the "vibe zone" will not be dismantled; instead it will be available for children's birthday parties and private rentals. EAC

SAM ADAMS FOR MAYOR SHOW: DOLOREAN, JACKSTRAW

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) It never ceases to amaze me that Dolorean aren't better known in Portland, and everywhere else for that matter. Their acoustic rock is classic, to be sure, but this is no "classic rock" retread. Dolorean's harmony-heavy sound is equal parts Neil Young and Gin Blossoms, with masterful lyrics and fearless (yeah, I said it) country music overtones. What's more, Dolorean has a bull's-eye accuracy for where the line of saccharine sweetness is, and how to expertly sidestep it. If you don't like alt-country, this isn't for you, but if you do, you won't find a better band in Portland or anywhere else. Tonight they play in support of mayoral candidate Sam Adams, who will speak in between sets. HANNAH CARLEN

ENGORGED, THE GOLERS, FUNEROT, SKARP, KUDZU

(Satyricon, 125 NW 6th) It is not uncommon to hear a crusty punk or metalhead state, without the slightest bit of self-awareness, "Dude, I love different types of music. I like death metal, thrash metal, crust, grind, stoner metal, hardcore..." And while it may take a trained ear to know it, tonight at Satyricon is a veritable cornucopia of metal styles. There's the straight-up thrash of Funerot, the brilliant octopi-obsessed grind-thrash of Engorged, the female-fronted blackout-grind weirdness of Skarp, the balls-out crust of Kudzu, and the punk-influenced, sloppy crossover of Vancouver, BC's the Golers. It has something for everyone, assuming of course that everyone wants essentially the same thing. ZACH BROOKS

SUNDAY 5/4

ELLEN ALLIEN, SASCHA FUNKE, M. QUIET, STARE5, ZITA

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See Music Feature.

OPETH, BETWEEN THE BURIED & ME, 3

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Portland prog-rock fans might feel slighted that they're not getting the full Progressive Nation tour, but think of it this way: Without Dream Theater on the bill, deluxe dark metallers Opeth get a headlining slot and a lot more time. (The average Dream Theater song lasts about 65 minutes—twice that if they're filming.) Last year's double live Opeth album, The Roundhouse Tapes, brought the Swedish death-defying metal band's soft/loud marriage down to earth, with a natural Led Zeppelin '70s feel and warm banter from vocalist/guitarist Mikael Åkerfeldt. Hopefully guitarist Peter Lindgren's recent departure won't jinx what could easily be the show of the year. Openers 3 increase the odds of success; their unique acoustic-slap Bach 'n' roll owes as much to solo Jeremy Enigk as to ye olde Dream Theater. Just don't call them "chamber metal." Their percussionist uses an ax. MM

MONDAY 5/5

GLASS CANDY, HARD PLACE, GEMINI

(East End, 203 SE Grand) See My, What a Busy Week!.

NURSES, INSIDE VOICES, BRET GAND IS DEAD, SINGSING

(Valentine's, 232 SW Ankeny) See Once More with Feeling.

YO MAJESTY, DOES IT OFFEND YOU YEAH?, FLESHTONE, DJ BEYONDA

(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) Okay, so points are deducted for excessive punctuation and evoking Austin Powers, but Does it Offend You, Yeah?, for the most part, don't. "We Are Rockstars" is a convincing declaration, switching abruptly but satisfyingly from cowbell and synth gnarl to an insanely hooky vocoder-ed chorus. Elsewhere on debut album You Have No Idea What You're Getting Yourself Into, the band flirts with pretty vapid runway rock ("Dawn of the Dead"), Daft Punk-ed electro vamps ("Weird Science"), and Rapture-ous punk-funk howl ("Let's Make Out"). Nothing impresses anywhere near as much as that chorus on "We Are Rockstars" (you are humming it right now), but I bet it all looks pretty good on the dance floor. ERIC GRANDY

TUESDAY 5/6

JOE JACKSON, MUTLU

(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) See My, What a Busy Week!.

DARK MEAT, MUSEE MECANIQUE

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See Music Feature.

WEDNESDAY 5/7

BLUE CRANES, WOW & FLUTTER

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!.

MINUS THE BEAR, PORTUGAL. THE MAN, THE BIG SLEEP

(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE 39th) See Music Feature.

PRIZE COUNTRY, DIESTO, SIRHAN SIRHAN, MINNOW

(Ash Street Saloon, 225 SW Ash) Nostalgia isn't a healthy habit, but neither is turning one's back on the past. The '90s certainly had its share of cultural embarrassments, but a certain brand of underground guitar rock from that decade remains pretty crucial. One only needs to look at the Amphetamine Reptile and Touch and Go rosters from that decade for affirmation of the lasting relevance of that era's trademark ugly guitar noise. Prize Country apparently share that sentiment. They manage to channel the same driving gutter sounds that made bands like the Jesus Lizard, Hammerhead, and Drive Like Jehu institutions, while tourmates Sirhan Sirhan tread a similar line but opt for a campier brand of nihilism. BRIAN COOK

THE B-52S, EAGLE SEAGULL

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) OMG! WTF! YAY! The B-52s are back! Wait, I don't think they ever went away... but anyway, they're in town and you'd best be getting your money-maker down to catch the gang's ass-shakin' show. Funplex, their new album—their first since 1992's Good Stuff—is nearly as good as their classics. Solid from start to finish, Funplex does everything the B-52s do well, like Fred Schneider barking out, "Tell your skirt to take a hike," and Cindy Wilson singing, "I'm your day-time waitress at the Taco Tiki Hut/I'm your day-time waitress, here's your stupid 7-Up." The B-52s simply don't age: It's like they've found some sort of dance shuttle to a cryogenic planet where beehives and lurex mini-skirts are interstellar requirements. I'll be there dancing my mess around, how 'bout you? COURTNEY FERGUSON