UP & COMING 

THURSDAY 6/5

CANCER RISING, NEEMA, KUBLAKAI, D. BLACK, DEBASER, LIVING PROOF, COOL NUTZ

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) See My, What a Busy Week!,

PAULA COLE, LONI ROSE

(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) It can feel like a nostalgic exercise listening to Paula Cole a decade after her pop-rock prominence. A full-bodied vocalist with jazz training, folk instincts, and soulful aspirations, Cole was almost as emblematic of the Lilith Fair years as Sarah McLachlan. That association and the then-ubiquity of her brilliant gender-role-critiquing hit "Where Have All the Cowboys Gone," as well as the emotive Dawson's Creek theme song, eventuated in her becoming a caricature of those years' flowery earnest excess, the opposite of the creaky-voiced quirk of today's popular songstresses. JALYLAH BURRELL

FRIDAY 6/6

SLY & THE FAMILY STONE TRIBUTE: DANCE TO THE MUSIC, EXCELLENT GENTLEMEN

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

THE KINKS TRIBUTE: BLUE SKIES FOR BLACK HEARTS, FUTURE HISTORIANS, JIM BRUNBERG

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See My, What a Busy Week!

ANIMAL FARM, COPACRESCENT, MIC CRENSHAW, SERGE SEVERE, STYLE MOLESTERS, MARV ELLIS

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) See

TIM SWEENEY, LINGER & QUIET, DJ HANUKKAH MIRACLE, DJ PRETTY PLEASE

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See Once More with Feeling

EAT SKULL, THE HUNCHES, MAYYORS, DJ BLACKHAWK

(East End, 203 SE Grand) Tonight I'm putting you all on double awesome excitement (the opposite of double secret probation). Why? Well, first off it's Eat Skull's record release party. The noisy, major-scale-whomping, two-chord pounding, fuzz-punk, Technicolor chunk-blowers shall celebrate the release of their first full-length for Siltbreeze records. It's called Sick to Death and the vinyl is limited, so if that's your bag, you'd better climb in. Second reason: the Hunches. Since the soon-to-be legendary Portland band performs once every four months, and since the end is in sight, well, that should be all you need to know. But just for the official record, here's the latest: The Hunches' upcoming and final album is finished. It should be out in September. A departure in many ways, it's fucking incredible. There'll be a release party, a West Coast tour, and that's it. ANDREW R TONRY Also see Our Town Could Be Your Life and My, What a Busy Week! (Sunday's listing).

DERBY, CROSSTIDE, CLIMBER

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Portland power pop trio Derby celebrates the release of their second album, Posters Fade, with an all-local, all-pop, pseudo-all-star bill at the Wonder. It's a big event, and a big deal for a band that's been slogging away for some time, developing strong songs and serious chops. And yeah, if ever a band were ready to leap into the mainstream, it's Derby. A few short years ago, one would have called their shiny pop rock radio friendly, but with radio having completely disappeared up its own ass, nowadays it's more accurate to say Derby is ready for soundtrack placement on your favorite ABC hour-long drama. This shouldn't change the fact that Posters Fade offers genuine pop pleasures, in the manner of Sloan or the Monkees, and that their live show is crisp, powerful, and rockin'. NED LANNAMANN

BLACK ELK, DIESTO, ROANOKE

(Ground Kontrol, 511 NW Couch) It's fitting that the release party for Diesto's stellar Isle of Marauder will take place surrounded by a ring of videogames. The local quartet's sprawling metal is ripe for the escapism that Ground Kontrol's quarter-hungry bounty has to offer, right down to the cover of Marauder, which depicts some sort of winged pterodactyl with feathered wings and skeleton talons primed to fuck some shit up. The music follows suit with an endless array of thick metal guitar riffs that drown everything else out in a hazy sludge of noise, the lone exception being the desperate screech of vocalist Chris Dunn, who sounds as one might when reaching one's bloody fate in the clutched grasp of a prehistoric bird of prey. EZRA ACE CARAEFF

ALL GIRL SUMMER FUN BAND, CRAYONSMITH, BOAT

(Exit Only, 1121 N Loring) I like bands, and I like summer and fun. Also, I like girls. So All Girl Summer Fun Band is going to work out just fine for me. They haven't played much since 2005, but they're back! Ari Douangpanya is absent this time around—she's a mom now—but the other three (Jen Sbragia from the Softies, Kim Baxter from Cherry Ice Cream Smile, and Kathy Harris from the Thermals) are still making contagious, feel-good candy pop. A new record is on the way, too! Oh, and let me add that I also like boats, or namely, BOAT, the Seattle trio who could just as easily call themselves All Boy Summer Fun Band—they're hilarious, they rock, and last time I saw them they had a giant stuffed white tiger onstage with them. I'm sure I don't need to explain to you how that makes the music better. NL

CICADA OMEGA, SASSPARILLA, BARK HIDE & HORN

(Dante's, 1 SW 3rd) If our town was one of juke joints and wooden shacks with stages protected by chicken wire, then Cicada Omega would be the house band of highest demand. The local rapscallions make bluesy low-fi country that has all the urgency of a call to battle, but still clutches enough subtlety to make their latest, These Bones, a delightful journey into some junkyard soul. While their rockabilly roots do show, Bones is best during tracks like "I Smell Smoke" and campfire shout-along "This Time," where the volume is low and vocalist Reverend B.D. Winfield's voice warbles like a ghostly recording broadcast through a dusty Victrola. EAC

HATEBREED, TYPE O NEGATIVE, 3 INCHES OF BLOOD, NORTHWEST ROYALE

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Type O Negative bassist/vocalist Peter Steele might not be the first person who comes to mind when you think of Brooklyn (Transylvania, maybe), but for over 20 years, the New York City gothic metaller has been an outer-borough mainstay. From his heinous (and to some, hilarious) salad days in crossover thrash band Carnivore—which penned the tongue-in-cheek songs "Race War" and "Male Supremacy"—to his creepy role in Type O Negative's ironic yet epic 1993 song about hair dye, "Black No. 1 (Little Miss Scare-All)," Steele has shown there's more to Brooklyn music than hiphop and indie rock. MIKE MEYER

SATURDAY 6/7

THE SHAKY HANDS, STARFUCKER, HORSE FEATHERS, DJ BEYONDA, DJ MAGIC BEANS

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!, and Once More with Feeling.

MATT SHEEHY, PWRFL POWER, BROTHERS YOUNG

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See Music Feature

THE DEAD SCIENCE, SHELLEY SHORT

(The Artistery, 4315 SE Division) The days of sleeping on the art rock dramatics of the Dead Science are over. The Seattle band just inked a deal with Montreal label Constellation (home to Godspeed You! Black Emperor), and full-length album number three, Villainaire (due out in September), seems set to propel the band's sultry baroque excess deep into the pop stratosphere. There are choice cameos (the fuckable dream team of Celebration's Katrina Ford and Shudder to Think's Craig Wedren), but the real delight is the falsetto croon of Sam Mickens, a voice that can dislodge the locked hips of even the most rigid indie rocker. EAC

SOFT TAGS, KAYLEE COLE, CROW CANYON

(Towne Lounge, 714 SW 20th Pl) In this current age of affordable recording software, Soft Tags keep the spirit of lo-fi alive with four-track opuses that gleam like excavated relics. Richard Shirk's vocals occasionally poke their way out of the murky froth like a Pentecostal howler, while chords are bludgeoned with all the subtlety of a battering ram. Live, acoustic guitars are cranked through amplifiers, and the drum setup dispenses with cymbals entirely, for a thumping, simplistic groove that will have your foot stomping the earth and your fist unconsciously crushing your can of beer. The flyer for this show boasts an appearance by "the Optophonic Carousel Lightshow," which could be promising, and "Free Books!" So expect some visuals and some book-learnin' along with your raw, bare-bones, indier-than-indie folk 'n' roll. NL

THE WHIPS & THE WHALES, THE BUGS, PHANTOM LIGHTS

(Twilight Café and Bar, 1420 SE Powell) There's something about the Twilight that goes so well with scrappy garage bands. Maybe it's the cheap, watery beers, or the near total disregard for aesthetic. Whatever the reason, the Twilight's cheap (often free) rock shows just work in the most raw and simple way. Tonight's pairing is better than usual: Grumptown's own Hovercraft Records has lined up three of their strongest bands to pound and wail for the love of loud. There's the Whips & the Whales, who do it straight; Phantom Lights, three ladies towing keyboards, dissonance, and a touch of dance; and the Bugs, a guitar/drums duo who are all flailing (and flaming) limbs. ART

SICK SICK SISTER, THE OVULATORS, PURPLE RHINESTONE EAGLE

(Kelly's Olympian, 426 SW Washington) I'm totally stoked for the inevitable resurgence of mid-'90s alternative power-pop. For this revival, the Ovulators will ride through town upon a sparkling horse of fun, their sound recalling a fuzz-soaked Hole mixed with the piercing sass of the Lunachicks. Post-riot grrrl popsters unite! Between sucking down bubblegum cigarettes, the Ovulators take back the night with "Masturbation Nation," an anthem encouraging women to take matters of sexuality into their own hands, and "#2," to which vocalist Dori Prange lends some empowering one-liners: "Too much to do to be distracted by you!/Too much to do to let you destroy me!," liberating those imprisoned by social constraints. Best of all: Their secret weapon is glitter! EM BROWNLOWE

SUNDAY 6/8

CRYSTAL CASTLES, DD/MM/YYYY, DJ BEYONDA, DJ WOLF

(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) See My, What a Busy Week!

EAT SKULL, FABULOUS DIAMONDS, MAYYORS, PSYCHEDELIC HORSESHIT

(Twilight Café and Bar, 1420 SE Powell) See My, What a Busy Week! and Our Town Could Be Your Life

VENETIAN SNARES, OTTO VAN SCHIRACH, CYRUSREX

(Fez Ballroom, 316 SW 11th) The music of Venetian Snares (Aaron Funk) is challenging. A lot of his tracks seem like random jumbles of breakcore noise, but underneath his hectic-sounding productions are complicated time signatures (7/4 is a recurring favorite), intricate programming, and even homages to Hungarian classical composers. Snares is touring with fellow weirdo Otto Von Schirach, a headliner in his own right, whose music can be even more extreme than Snares, with its grotesque imagery, punishing rhythms, and demonic vocals. The nice thing about both of these guys is that they are completely out of hand, but throughout their brew of jungle/breakcore insanity are intermissions of danceable beats, and the overwhelming sense that there is some sort of genius going on inside their brains that you'll eventually understand if you just tolerate the music a little bit longer. AVA HEGEDUS

THE SUBMARINES, HELOISE & THE SAVOIR FAIRE

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) New York City's Heloise & the Savoir Faire are no strangers to the hype machine. After silver screen hero Elijah Wood's signing of the group to his own Simian Records, and a major studio cameo and endorsement by Debbie Harry, there seemed little short of a giant Times Square billboard that could have boasted any more stratospheric accolades. But for once, the proof is in the pudding, as Heloise Williams' disco-dance punk explosion has sent more than just the elite milieu into fits of dance floor gyration. The group's debut album, Trash, Rats, and Microphones, assuages the pretension of similarly raucous outfits with pinches of punk rock à la the Gossip, with the added bonus that their live show incorporates the dance duo of Joe Shepard and Sara Sweet Rabidoux. RYAN J. PRADO

CITIZEN FISH, INTRO5PECT, ETHER CIRCUS, MDC UNPLUGGED

(Satyricon, 125 NW 6th) Joke all you want about the crusty-punk patches, the dumpster diving, and that one tattered sleeveless shirt Dick Lucas has been sporting since the Thatcher administration—Citizen Fish are untouchable. Same goes for their less-ska punk brothers in the Subhumans; it's as if everything Lucas & Co. touch turns into pure DIY punk gold. Citizen Fish never belonged alongside the frat (rude) boys of Reel Big Fish and the like. Instead, Lucas' band always seemed less like a ska act than a punk band that just so happened to come across some horns. Now, time to get that man a new T-shirt. EAC

BILL FRISELL TRIO WITH EYVIND KANG & RUDY ROYSTON

(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Guitarist Bill Frisell boasts a distinctive tone and an impressive resume, including work with artists as diverse as Petra Haden, John Zorn, and graphic novelist and animator Jim Woodring. Frisell's own albums have, in the last decade, taken country and bluegrass as starting points, then veered into an offbeat, minimalist style of funk, and incorporated work from his contemporaries from across the globe. Regardless of the style in which he's working, Frisell's clarity of playing serves as a constant, and his approach makes the complex sound effortless. TOBIAS CARROLL

MONDAY 6/9

THE BLACK ANGELS, THE WARLOCKS

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Remember when My Bloody Valentine was dead, and a Kevin Shields influence was novel? The Warlocks sounded good last year with Heavy Deavy Skull Lover, but this was before an MBV reunion was certain. "The Valley of Death" and "Moving Mountains" evoked Loveless by breaking apart peaks of hardened love-song syrup with overdriven, psychedelic rattle. Now that we can hear Loveless live (if we want to spring for airfare), the allure of the Warlocks is beginning to fade. Luckily, "So Paranoid" and "Slip Beneath" are more Brian Jonestown Massacre than MBV—janglier than your average MBV mindmelt, but no less transcendent. MM

ANNUALS, MUSEE MECANIQUE, A WEATHER

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) I sort of hate it when kids get it right at such an early age. I think of how little I did at 19 and then realize that Annuals' frontman Adam Baker, at the same age, was busying completing Be He Me, their excellent Ace Fu debut. That record is a beast of riotous fun, sounding like Sufjan Stevens alongside Broken Social Scene, which is why it's no surprise they quickly became critical darlings in no time at all. Their live show is a thing of legend, chockfull of youthful exuberance and a six-piece band that constantly switches instruments. Yep, the kids are indeed all right, and I'm pretty jealous. ROB SIMONSEN Annuals also play at Music Millennium, 3158 E Burnside, 6:30 pm, free, all ages.

TUESDAY 6/10

RUSSIAN CIRCLES, DAUGHTERS, YOUNG WIDOWS

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week! and Music Feature

LOCAL H, THE PHOTO ATLAS, SHARPENING MARKERS

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) There was a time when KNRK seemingly played the same damned five or six songs in constant rotation. Maybe they still do now, but back then at least three of 'em had to have been Local H's "Bound for the Floor." Before rock duos became fashionable, these two Chicagoans were peerless for years in the sensitivity and intensity of their signature sound. Great, abrasive albums (Pack up the Cats, Whatever Happened to P.J. Soles?) would follow, but fresh radio airplay was grounded and the once-golden sales became tarnished. Like that shit even matters. JUSTIN PETERSON

WEDNESDAY 6/11

PERHAPST, NORFOLK & WESTERN, TWO BEERS

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

TIMES NEW VIKING, PSYCHEDELIC HORSESHIT, FABULOUS DIAMONDS

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See. Also see My, What a Busy Week! (Sunday's listing)

ROCK PLAZA CENTRAL, PORTUGAL. THE MAN, TRACTOR OPERATOR

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) Led by novelist Chris Eaton, Rock Plaza Central is a Toronto ensemble whose albums feel less like linear narratives than hallucinatory meditations on a theme. 2006's Are We Not Horses served as the junction of rapturous vocals, buoyant horns, and crashing guitars. Listen closely enough, though, and surreal lyrical perspectives on religion, technology, and relationships become apparent. On previous albums, the group's wide-ranging sensibilities have been applied to more directly personal narratives, creating detailed and harrowing portraits and landscapes. Eaton's voice is equally capable of channeling desperation and a heartbreaking strain of loneliness, and the unpredictability of the group as a whole makes their live show, at its best, gripping. TC

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