Up & Coming 

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THURSDAY 10/16

QUINTRON & MISS PUSSYCAT, GOLDEN TRIANGLE, DANAVA

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) See My What a Busy Week!, pg. 17.

BOY EATS DRUM MACHINE , DAT'R , SOUTHERN BELLE

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See Music, pg. 21.

WATAIN, WITHERED, BOOK OF BLACK EARTH, EALDATH, ZOROASTER

(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) Uh oh. Those Swedish sick fucks in Watain combine two "progressive" things that Portland generally avoids: blood and religion. (Actually, three things if we're counting black metal.) These anti-universe vanguards turn our dead meat against us, buying throwaway cuts and slop buckets from butcher shops, and reanimating the pulp in showers of muck and blast-beats. They'll keep the corpse rituals to themselves if requested, but Rotture should be careful not to offend anti-Christian sentiment. (It's Halloween time, for fuck's sake.) Atlanta crusters Withered support the Swedes with shattered heathen cries and polytheistic guitar leads, while Seattle's Book of Black Earth trace the MTV2-popular deathcore back to its His Hero Is Gone roots. Zoroaster open with a bolt-to-the-head brand of effects-heavy doom. We shall feel no pain. MIKE MEYER

AKIL, RAMSEY BROS, DJ IZM

(Crown Room, 205 NW 4th) With the much-beloved (but now defunct) Los Angeles hiphop group Jurassic 5, it was typically hard to pin down any individual characteristics of the crew's four emcees that weren't named Chali 2na. 2na-fish's distinctive baritone and deliberate flow was about the only voice that cut through and managed to shine during their old-school tradeoff routines—so even the most diehard of fans would have a tough time discerning a personality between Mark 7even, Zaakir, and the man of the hour, Akil. Now known as Akil the MC, the former J5'er is touring the world and prepping the release of his debut solo album ATM. Voice- and flow-wise, however, Akil remains unremarkable beyond his respect for the culture and his uplifting content, so it remains to be seen if his solo career will be any more memorable. LARRY MIZELL JR.

MICHAEL MANAHAN, JAK, BIOSONIK

(The Station, 2410 N Mississippi) Seattle's Michael Manahan is known for mixing music and mysticism. As a co-founder of Starborne Productions, he coordinates the Oracle Gatherings, a series of events that incorporate beats, healing arts, and spiritual transformation. He has produced over 20 large-scale dance parties organized around a set of principles that involve love, oneness, respect for nature (the Starborne sound system powers 10,000 watts with biodiesel fuel), and related numinous values. Even if you're not into the concept of enlightenment through raving, there is some intrigue to a DJ whose goal is to nourish your soul through dance music. His sound is often along the trance and tribal house lines, but Manahan's sets are evolving to include techier sounds as well. Opening DJs Jak and Biosonik are always reliable for bringing a solid mix of house and techno. AVA HEGEDUS

THE SHAKY HANDS , THE ACORN, OHBIJOU

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) The Shaky Hands were the toast of Portland last year with the release of their self-titled first album, but their second record, Lunglight, is moodier and more accomplished. Jettisoning those immediately catchy hooks in favor of darker, deeper corners, the Shaky Hands still boast a peppy backbeat behind every song, but the guitars are rustier, and the guilelessly sunny mood has fermented into a headier, more potent brew. They're hitting the road with Ottawa, Canada's the Acorn, who have transformed from the one-man bedroom sketches of Rolf Klausener into a full-fledged ensemble. The Acorn's music now contains some of the communal reverie of Arcade Fire, but never at the expense of the delicate, beautiful intricacy of its folk-based melodies. NED LANNAMANN

THE PINK SNOWFLAKES , CANDY APPLE,

THE WORTHLESS CHILDREN,

LEOPOLD & HIS FICTION

(East End, 203 SE Grand) The tsunami wave of Northern California garage-rock exhibitionists has reached a fever pitch, and emerging as one of the more broad-scoped acts is San Francisco's Leopold and His Fiction. Splashing snippets of the region's depleting freak-folk aesthetic and sopping them up with a Stooges-esque barroom stomp, vocalist Daniel James invokes the familiar, pure rock 'n' roll charisma afforded only the deftest students of its origins. It would seem easy to lump the band alongside such retro-rock luminaries as the White Stripes (James and White have eerily similar voices), but that just proves a copout to the praises of Leopold's jangly, hollow, reverb revelry. RYAN J. PRADO

FRIDAY 10/17

THE DIRTY DOZEN BRASS BAND

(Jimmy Mak's, 221 NW 10th) The waggishness of New Orleanians is legendary, and the Crescent City's Dirty Dozen Brass Band fits the bill perfectly. The veteran outfit, most of whom have lived jazz for three decades, would rather fuse the vital genres of their time—funk, R&B, alt-rock, and hiphop—than replicate an early 20th century field recording. Not that tradition isn't sacred, but they, like their three-years-drowned city, have a highly developed process for dealing with death. Elegiac, ecstatic, and moving forward like the first line of a funeral procession, they beckon listeners to form a convivial second line, as on their passionate pre-Katrina sendoff for band co-founder Tuba Fats, Funeral for a Friend, and on their post-Katrina wail, What's Going On. Whereas few have kept their promises to their city, the Dirty Dozen isn't known to disappoint. JALYLAH BURRELL

LOWENBAD , THE STAXX BROTHERS,

SERGE SEVERE

(Crown Room, 205 NW 4th) Everett, Washington's soul-rock-hiphop band the Staxx Brothers—fresh off of a well-received appearance at Bumbershoot—are bursting at the seams to share their heart-swole musical vision, as so ably demonstrated on their heralded debut release 12th Street Blues. The Bros' battle-tested (not to mention legally blind) emcee, Decurrian, brings a smooth delivery that meshes well with Davin Stedman's gutsy, big-lunged vocals and a rhythm section that Stedman himself insists is "heavy enough to walk right into the Stax studios and back up any of those fine soul artists." Hey, I can dig it. LM

JOLIE HOLLAND, HERMAN DUNE

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Portland should be furious with Jolie Holland. After swinging through town tonight, she's absconding with some of our finest musicians, taking Rachel Blumberg and Dave Depper of Norfolk & Western and Sean Flinn of the Nick Jaina Band with her on her travels. But with one listen to her excellent new album, The Living and the Dead, and the romantic, desperately gorgeous folk pop contained therein, the anger just melts away. Holland's earlier work sounded like jazzy time-warp calico-print folk exhumed from some early part of the 20th century. Her newest songs, however, are fully alive and kicking, filled with the grand flourishes of rock, the heartbeat-skipping honesty of folk, and the hot-breath immediacy of sultry bedroom jamz. Go ahead and take what you need from Portland, Jolie; we don't mind. NL

LEIGH MARBLE , TELEDUBGNOSIS SOUND SYSTEM, AUDITORY SCULPTURE

(The Press Club, 2621 SE Clinton) Grainy folk-rock local Leigh Marble took a chance when he decided to let a slew of his more ambitious electronic artist peers revamp six of the songs off of his sophomore album, Red Tornado. The flaking, bare openness of Marble's compositions, though, harbored more than enough blank space to invite darkly hypnotic remixes on his new EP Twister. Seattle's Teledubgnosis, along with Urbex and Mission Creep, all had hands in twisting the dials, and Marble himself even remixed two songs under nom de plume Dr. Marble. Heavy doses of dub permeate the mix, with Marble's wavering vocals drowning spookily in and out of balance. To see these remixes deconstructed should be impressive. RJP

PINBACK, MR. TUBE & THE FLYING OBJECTS

(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE 39th) I can't recall the first time I heard a lot of bands, but I remember exactly where I was the first time I heard Pinback via their sophomore album, Blue Screen Life. For the record, I was building a diorama in my college classmate's bedroom, but that's unimportant. What's crucial is that it's a rare record that can leave such an indelible first impression, attaching itself to a memory as though predestined or at least digitally added in post-production: a blue-screened memory. Since then, Pinback have seemed less memorable, as they repeatedly reiterate their perfectly understated, intricate, and subliminally catchy indie rock sound (although "AFK" is one hell of an earworm). Still, who knows which moments will stick with you? Tonight might be the most haunting Pinback performance yet. ERIC GRANDY

R9: GEORGE HOLLAND, BRYAN ZENTZ

(Pi-Rem, 440 NW Glisan) A few months ago, dance floor devotees took a hit when R9, the monthly party run by international techno veteran and Portland transplant Bryan Zentz, went on indefinite hiatus. Fortunately, the break turned out to be brief, and things are back on track and better than ever. Zentz is making a few changes, including the smart move of bringing George Holland on board as a resident. Given the merits of these two DJs as individuals, one can only imagine the hotness that will occur with a team effort. Both have a deep history in techno, acid house, electro, and the like, plus a reputation for stocking the best new tracks and an ability to read any crowd and keep the dance floor energized. Another welcome upgrade is the addition of live visuals from local artists. Dates are posted through the end of the year, and if all is right in the world, R9 will continue well into the future. AVA

THE LEGENDARY PINK DOTS

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) Anglo-Dutch goth-psychedelic group the Legendary Pink Dots have been haunting the musical fringes for 28 years, accumulating a significant, cultish fanbase despite little commercial airplay and releases on small labels. Through the band's staunch devotion to their brand of pastoral, spacey, polyglot rock and vocalist Edward Ka-Spel's dramatic, enervated spiels, LPD appeal to melancholy dreamers. Ka-Spel's voice bears a Syd Barrett-like lugubriousness that complements LPD's rambling, often disorienting excursions into the Floydian slipstream. This tour is in support of LPD's new disc, Plutonium Blonde, which offers the group's usual panoply of moods and styles, most of them fairly spectral and disturbing. DAVE SEGAL

SATURDAY 10/18

ALL GIRL SUMMER FUN BAND, GRANT O, EXPLODE INTO COLORS

(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) See Music, pg. 19.

THE RUMBLE STRIPS, BIRDMONSTER, GO FEVER

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See Music, pg. 21.

THE DEAD SCIENCE, PILL THIEF,

VANISHING KIDS

(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) It's a common mistake to think of the Dead Science's latest, Villainaire—a ridiculously overly indulgent glimpse of pop music in all its glistening pleasure—as an album riddled with fancy-lad lyrics of tender expression, basically acting as a stopgap measure until the next Moz record drops. Instead, Villainaire is full of Wu-Tang and comic book references, influences that initially feel out of place considering the gorgeous orchestration of the album and the gentle showtunes howl of frontman Sam Mickens. But the band's devotion to both Method Man and Iron Man is a sincere gesture, thus injecting a liberal dose of human warmth and passion into an otherwise barren presentation. Absolutely gorgeous opening number "Throne of Blood (The Jump Off)" sets the bar at heavenly heights, only to be hurdled minutes later with the delicate and brooding "Make Mine Marvel." EZRA ACE CARAEFF

STEREOLAB, RICHARD SWIFT, MONADE

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) There's not much left to say about Stereolab at this point, seeing as how the group is easily one of the most canonized of the '90s alternative scene. You can credit them for introducing cross-armed indie rockers to the thrilling genres of Kraut rock, bossa nova, and lounge, all while doing so with an efficient, if not effortless, brilliance. And with this year's Chemical Chords—the band's 11th studio record—they prove, again, just how talented they really are, tackling doo-wop like the foreign, seasoned vets that they are. What's next, Stereolab? Norwegian black metal? At this point, with the legacy they have amassed, I would wager they could even pull that one off with ease. ROB SIMONSEN

SUNDAY 10/19

DAR WILLIAMS, SHAWN MULLINS

(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Having once whirled through a skylit basement apartment to the woman-positive strains of "As Cool as I Am," I can testify to Dar Williams' rapturous appeal. Hers is hair-tossing music without the comely artifice. It's foot stomping and socially conscious; it's Ophelia revived, but it can at times feel dated. A folk-popper, she recalls the sunny '90s, when her career first took flight. If not for her social consciousness—check "Buzzer" from her latest album Promised Land—and a lovingly cultivated fanbase, her career would show more prominent signs of rust. JB

MONDAY 10/20

DENGUE FEVER

(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) See My What a Busy Week!, pg. 17.

LAKE, DESOLATION WILDERNESS, ARRINGTON DE DIONYSO, DUAL DIAGNOSIS

(Rererato, 5135 NE 42nd) While they might have one of the most un-Google-able band names period, Portland/Olympia's Lake remain a pretty great slice of Northwest folky-pop. And if "Blue Ocean Blue," a track from their forthcoming Oh, the Places We'll Go album out on K Records, is any indication, you're going to be hearing a lot more about this band in the near future. With a bouncy bassline, hand claps, cowbell, and sugary sweet female vocals, the song is all kinds of pop goodness. Good luck trying to track it down though: Not even "Lake + Band + Portland" yields any promising search results. RS

TUESDAY 10/21

THE MOUNTAIN GOATS, KAKI KING

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) See My What a Busy Week!, pg. 17 and Once More with Feeling, pg. 29.

EVANGELICALS, PARENTHETICAL GIRLS, BLUE HERONS

(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) Hailing from the college town of Norman, Evangelicals share a fearless lust for sonic exploration with fellow Oklahomans the Flaming Lips, but rather than sounding like furry, inscrutable aliens, the vocals of frontman Josh Jones sound completely—almost painfully—human. Undeniable, cut-to-the-heart melodies are ornamented with prog-rock guitars, ghostly echoing backing vocals, and arrangements that turn themselves inside out and back again. Their latest, The Evening Descends, is a breathtaking and riveting listen, hitting emotional high points with "Skeleton Man" and "Paperback Suicide." But they're not merely studio wanks; Evangelicals put on one of the very best live shows around, packed with energy, mystery, shrieking, shredding, and brain-expanding sounds. NL

DJ C

(Ohm, 31 NW 1st) DJ C got a couple of big breaks a few years ago. First, legendary BBC radio host John Peel named C's Mashit Records label of the month, citing the ability of the first few releases to burn up just about any dance floor while mixing any and all genres. Shortly after that Diplo asked C to remix a track he was working on for M.I.A., which proceeded to completely explode, giving a boost to everyone involved. Aside from running and producing music for his own label, C has released tracks on Shockout, Ninja Tune, and Community Library. He appears in Portland for a special "Ragganaught" edition of Reactionary Tuesdays, a new breakcore and dubstep weekly at Ohm. Although DJ C makes it a point to represent a very wide variety of styles, expect a focus on jungle and ragga sounds this time around. AVA

WEDNESDAY 10/22

POH-HOP: ILLMACULATE, ONLY ONE, BRAILLE, KENNY MACK, DUBBLE OO

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) See My What a Busy Week!, pg. 17.

THE KOOKS, THE WHIGS

(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) The Kooks are officially too big to be cool, but your little sister loves the hell out of 'em, and at least she's not listening to the Jonas Brothers, right? The title of their latest, Konk, pays explicit homage to the Kinks (Konk is the name of Ray Davies' studio), who pulled all these same tricks years ago, but, hey, if it sends your sister to Everyday Music to rummage through the bins for a copy of Arthur, it can't be all bad. The Whigs, meanwhile, are opening, and while it may appear that the Athens, Georgia, rockers are turning into perennial also-rans, the undeniable thunderous pop stomp of their Replacements-gone-South riffage might just give li'l sis some new heartthrobs to pin up on the wall. NL

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