Up & Coming 

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THURSDAY 10/30

LYKKE LI, FRIENDLY FIRES

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) If you missed Lykke Li last time she came through town, don't make the mistake of sleeping on the sprightly Swedish pop chanteuse again. College students and bloggers alike have been busy blowing her up, so see her now before she goes strictly stadium. MS

THE SPINTO BAND, FRIGHTENED RABBIT, BLUE SKIES FOR BLACK HEARTS

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Frightened Rabbit's debut was the best record of last year, but this year's The Midnight Organ Fight is even better, pairing Scott Hutchison's devastating lyrics with brother Grant's powerful drumming. The Scottish band has just released a live acoustic album but will be in full-on pummeling mode tonight, and, goofy name aside, they are truly fantastic—this is a show you won't want to miss. NL

DEVIN THE DUDE, THE COUGHEE BROTHAZ, CHICHARONES

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) With his old man face and lanky teenage body, Devin the Dude cuts a peculiar figure that's intensified by an easy cheese-grin and earnestly delivered scatological and sophomoric rhymes. His comforting singsong rasp and obvious but never obtuse humor endears him to a vocal minority of hiphop fans. His rhymes certainly embrace the everyday, if only as interpreted through weeded senses. His stage energy betrays most stoner stereotypes, though, with him striding through a catalog of guest appearances, his own memorable compositions (e.g., "Boo Boo'n" and "Lacville '79"), and with the recent release of his fifth studio album Landing Gear, no doubt some new material as well. JALYLAH BURRELL

CITIZEN COPE, ALICE SMITH

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Grammy-nominated Citizen Cope co-conspirator Alice Smith's For Lovers, Dreamers & Me showed a shocking breadth, a wicked ambition, and a voice powerful enough to light the Vegas strip. Incorporating rock, jazz, soul, and showtunes into a cohesive vision without stumbling is hard enough as is, but to breathe life into it with daring vocal work and gorgeous, candid songwriting has Smith lingering in the wings of the big leagues. When first witnessed live, her rock-born "let it go" attitude and total commitment made me forget I was sitting in a normally tame jazz and "adult contemporary" venue. Now I look forward to seeing homegirl someplace where I, too, can, "let it go." LARRY MIZELL JR.

SOUTHERLY , TANGO ALPHA TANGO, SWIM SWAM SWUM , DEER OR THE DOE , COLT VISTA

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Headliners Southerly are up front with their pretty, non-threatening variety of rock 'n' roll, but in this case, gentle does not mean without force. Portland-based since 2006, Krist Krueger stitched together material out of acoustic melodies, silky smooth vocals and a three-piece backing band. The group swirls a few genres together, but if the concept is busy, the cohesion is right on. Also onboard for KPSU's night of five bands for $5 is Tango Alpha Tango, a group with plenty of energy and a clever collection of lyrics. They'll get you riled up before you settle down with a mellow drink to sway with Southerly. KAITLIN JOHNSON

FRIDAY 10/31

EAGLES OF DEATH METAL, THE DUKE SPIRIT

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) See Cheap Thrills.

ZOMBIE PROM: ALPHABET STEW, GRAY MATTERS, THRILLA

(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE 39th) The scariest thing I can conceive of happening this Halloween is for Alphabet Stew's CD release party to be lost in the mix. The emcee duo of Al-One (Sandpeople) and Andy B—plus DJs Wels and Spark—have recorded one of the best albums to come out of Portland in ages, Mentil Soup. The disc is a funky, funny, offbeat, and technically astounding piece of work—the kind of lighthearted, but still really real (for real) hiphop that is seldom seen this side of the 21st century. So on this big night, do yourself a favor: Cut out of the costume party early and get to this show. There will be candy, there will be rappers, but there will be no candy rappers. GRAHAM BAREY

TRICK OR VOTE: BLUE GIANT, BLIND PILOT, DJ BEYONDA & MORE

(AudioCinema, 226 SE Madison) Two of this year's most notable Portland bands—one a group of newcomers, the other made up of familiar faces—come together for the Bus Project's Trick or Vote celebration. Blind Pilot is officially "Portland's Next Big Thing," having had a triumphant year with the release of their fantastic, compassionate debut, 3 Rounds and a Sound. Blue Giant is the supergroup with members of Viva Voce, the Decemberists, and others, and their three-date Portland tour earlier this month was a publicity stunt that paid off; their tremendous set with Corrina Repp and the Portland Cello Project showed they're pretty much capable of anything. Tonight's party is free for Trick or Vote volunteers, who will be spending the first part of the evening knocking on doors to remind folks to turn in their ballots. But if you don't feel like canvassing, you're welcome to pay the cover and join the party as well; with this lineup, it's one Halloween party you won't want to miss. NED LANNAMANN

MAGNETIC MORNING, DREW ANDREWS, SILVERHAWK

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Supergroups are seldom as super as Magnetic Morning. It's not enough that Swervedriver frontman Adam Franklin holds the reins and Interpol drummer Sam Fogarino mans the kit—the group had to go out and recruit Jimmy LaValle of the Album Leaf to handle the bass duties. Not fair. But on A.M. the (mostly) New York band blares through an atmospheric haze of ambitious rock songs, not too far from the previous work of the band's respective components. They might not be the most ideal Halloween band—I suspect they won't be leading a rowdy sing-along of "Monster Mash"—but it's next to impossible to deny a band of this much talent. Not tonight, and not ever. EZRA ACE CARAEFF

PARTS & LABOR, GOWNS, CHROME WINGS

(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) Over the course of four albums and numerous EPs, Parts & Labor have taken a sound based on punk rock, avant-garde rhythms, and jarring, transcendent bursts of noise and streamlined it by exploring the inherent tension of those elements and finding outlets for surprisingly blissful expansions and revisions. Their latest album, Receivers, may be their most accessible, but its incorporation of third-party audio contributions and field recordings suggests that the group is hardly done challenging themselves. Openers Gowns bridge the art/pop divide in a very different way, with Erika Anderson's mournful, cathartic vocals atop waves of manipulated guitar and violin. As with their 2007 album Red State, the listener may be alternately comforted and disarmed, unsettled and enlightened. TOBIAS CARROLL

MDC, NO RED FLAGS , THE ALTARBOYS , MY NEW VICE , BELLIGERENTS

(Plan B, 1305 SE 8th) Remember that Jello Biafra tale about how he wore an MDC: Millions of Dead Cops T-shirt to jury duty, only for the court to assign him to a jury anyway? Well, tonight you can rock those threads without fear, as MDC transform for Halloween into the haunting sounds of Millions of Dead Corpses. MDC have been pissing off parents for close to 30 years now, but with new material on (fingers-crossed) President-to-be Obama, and a new split 7-inch with the likes of Citizen Fish and more, the band isn't resting on their laurels. Expect their vintage political hardcore to raise the angry zombies of the punk rock dead, who, once they rise from their graves, will give you kids a stern lecture on how punk was just better back in their day. Now that truly is scary. EAC

RAY DAVIES BABIES WITH RABIES, COCO COBRA AND THE KILLERS, THE LEADERS, THE MEAN JEANS

(East End, 203 SE Grand) How can I recommend a band that I myself have never heard? It's simple, really: The band's name is Ray Davies Babies with Rabies. That alone should get you scrambling out the door and down to East End, but if you need a few more deets: It's members of the Hunches and Sleepwalkers RIP cranking out slimy, sloppy, grimy, gloppy rock 'n' roll for a set of classic garage and punk covers to close out your Halloween. What's more, Coco Cobra and the Killers are making their welcome return to the Portland stage, playing melodic punk with just the right amount of sleaze—oh my god, it's better than candy. NL

SATURDAY 11/1

DIPLO, ABE VIGODA, BOY 8-BIT, TELEPATHE

(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE 39th) Few DJs command the kind of respect that Diplo does. Quite possibly the finest tastemaker of our generation—not bad for some kid from Florida—Diplo brings his Mad Decent posse for an evening of varying genres, tons of dance floor action, and (if press materials are to be believed) a costumed "dancing pizza slice." Come for Diplo; stay for the poor intern crammed into a foam pizza outfit. EAC

METALLICA, DOWN, THE SWORD

(Rose Garden, 1 Center Ct) See Life Magnetic.

RYLAND BOUCHARD, GABE HASCALL, EMPEROR X

(The Artistery, 4315 SE Division) See Our Town Could Be Your Life.

TORCHE, COLISEUM, CLOUDS

(Satyricon, 125 NW 6th) A funny thing is happening to a small army of would-be post-metallers. Bands like Torche and Clouds—with ties to artful Hydra Head Records and tedious styles—aren't necessarily choosing the high road (well...) in their respective new efforts. They're just playing well. Torche's Meanderthal burns down to a driving, melodic hard-rock groove after threats of a speedier Pelican. The Miami/Atlanta outfit would be up for KISS-influenced album of the year, should such an award exist. Boston's Clouds do a bang-up job of harnessing the almighty power of Northwest proto-grunge. Last year's Legendary Demo emulated the belt-busting superfuzz of classic Mudhoney and Fitz of Depression, with some Danzig "Mother"-howl to boot. Sarcastic, maybe. Fun, definitely. MIKE MEYER

DERBY , THE DIMES , MATT SHEEHY

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) It's a Log Love local showcase at the Fir tonight, featuring music that deserves to be noticed far outside Portland. Headliners Derby make astonishingly competent pop/rock that is begging to be heard coming out of radio speakers across the country. Their latest, Posters Fade, is packed to the gills with hooks and melodies, stringing a series of songs that are easy to love. The Dimes, meanwhile, will be on hand with their New England EP, which slots a John Lennon cover alongside their standard catchy sensitive-guy soft rock. And make absolutely sure you are front and center for opener Matt Sheehy, whose debut solo album Tigerphobia is one of this year's best albums—local or otherwise. Sheehy transcends familiar singer/songwriter terrain by allowing his tunes to succumb to mystery and hope. He's seriously one of the best things around right now, so if you haven't heard him yet, it's time to get with the goddamn program. NL

DAY OF THE DEAD CELEBRATION: VAGABOND OPERA , JASON WEBLEY

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) While I'm not one to endorse an event that boasts a "ritualistic fire ceremony," I'll go on record and vouch for Vagabond Opera's eclectic Day of the Dead celebration. This local motley crew of junkyard gypsies with a flair for the party stomp of Eastern European klezmer (and just about everything in between) brings their own unique twist to Dia de los Muertos, complete with traditional installations, Mexican hot chocolate, and a parade. What, no churros? EAC

CHRIS CORNELL

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Tell me, what do you get when one of the most iconic voices in rock and the most innovative hiphop/pop producer of the last decade team up to make beautiful, soul-searing music together? Correct answer: The soggy shit sandwich known as "Long Gone," the single from the never-awaited album-length collaboration between Chris Cornell and Timbaland. Audioslave's merits were at least (I think) debatable, but this song is a limp, regrettable mistake that would even have Coldplay screaming at the bus driver to "turn that shite off." Gnarls Barkley, this is all your fucking fault. LM

SUNDAY 11/2

THE NIGHTWATCHMAN, BOOTS RILEY

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) See Army of One.

DAY OF LIONS , DOUBLEDUTCH,

HENRY CLAY PEOPLE

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) We need no reminders that folk rock has been ridden to the point of exhaustion in recent years, but when a folk band still manages to knock your socks off with hearty tracks and stunning vocals, the pesky folk label doesn't matter so much. Day of Lions frontwoman Gena Gastaldi provides lovely vocals and acoustic guitar while a collection of her nearest and dearest back her up on drums, cello, violin, and bass. Not surprisingly, the focus of their ballads is love, but instead of rendering sickeningly sweet and sappy songs, Gastaldi and pals create music that goes right to the heart—quite literally—of the matter. Their tracks might sting the freshly wounded, but overall their songs are a gentle reminder that everyone inevitably endures some heartache from time to time. KJ

MONDAY 11/3

DR. LONNIE SMITH, DONALD HARRISON, MEL BROWN, DAN FAEHNLE

(Jimmy Mak's, 221 NW 10th) The good Dr. Lonnie Smith continues to wrest the best from his Sunday morning instrument, the Hammond B-3 organ. Equally adept at the furor and subtlety of gospel, the turban-wearing jazzman treats every note like it's sacred, as on his Eastern-influenced latest, Jungle Soul. But it's his up-north soulful swing, fortified by a malleable singing voice and a delightful excess of personality, that's shaken so many hips in four decades of prominence. Locals Mel Brown and Dan Faehnle, who impressed Smith on an earlier visit, support, along with the genre-hopping New Orleans saxophonist and educator Donald Harrison. JB

TUESDAY 11/4

MERCURY ELECTION NIGHT PARTY: DJ GREGARIOUS

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Tonight is not the night to be alone. Whether it's to shriek with joy when Obama cinches 270 electoral votes, or sob in each others' arms when McCain pulls off a (highly improbable, but I'm paranoid) upset, join the Mercury at the Doug Fir! Political guru Steve Novick will be on hand to explain what's happening around the country (and on our big screen TV), while local electeds like Sam Adams will help us toast and roast the winners and losers. Meanwhile, DJs Gregarious and FlightRisk keep the beats rolling. AJR

METHOD MAN, REDMAN, EVIDENCE & ALCHEMIST, TERMANOLOGY, ANIMAL FARM, DJ WICKED, DJ WELS

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) What better way to ring in Election Night buzz than by dragging your constituency to the Roseland to bounce with hiphop's incumbent royal duo Method Man and Redman? We're stumped to think of a better distraction than thumping, heady rhymes and doo-rags to usher in the new administration. RJP

CORRUPTED, ASUNDER, TREES, ALDEBARAN

(Satyricon, 125 NW 6th) Independent Japanese music is too often made mystifying by stateside critics, but in the case of Osaka's Corrupted, critics are given only mystery to critique. This is the funeral-doom band's first stateside tour in 11 years. They don't do interviews or photo shoots, and they sing in Spanish. Yes, Spanish. Their music, however, is near universal. Unlike noise and psychedelic acts—by which this underground is often spearheaded—Corrupted bleed raw, human emotion. The band's international catalog of splits and lengthy mood pieces has matured from wit's-end sludge to semi-acoustic post-rock. Heavy live clips on YouTube show that even the band's pretty faces can get very ugly. In times of potential catastrophe, such regression is warranted. MM

WEDNESDAY 11/5

PINK WIDOWER, HUNGRY GHOST, MANGAS

(Someday Lounge, 125 NW 5th) Portland's Pink Widower will be celebrating the release of their excellent new album, The Enchanted Realm of the Pink Widower, by way of funk-anchored, sing-along indie pop. Throw in some horns and a clunky gypsy cloak, and enchantment seems like a fitting midweek emotion. RJP

RAY LaMONTAGNE, LEONA NAESS

(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) After ditching his gig at a shoe factory in Maine some nine years ago, Ray LaMontagne has blazed a rags-to-riches route as one of folk-rock's most dependable singer/songwriters. The rough and tumble croon of LaMontagne has guided me through my share of hardships, which I almost hate to admit due to the fact that there's nothing really spectacular about his music. There's nothing bad about it either. It's complacent, repetitive, depressing, and sometimes downright average. The backwoods troubadour, however, was born with both the raspiness of an elm-stained chainsaw and the velvet ripple of a chocolate cupcake. Couple those delectable endearments with an unfair wall of cello, viciously bone-bearing lyricism, that clichéd (though, in this case, totally legit) mountain man mystique, and good luck escaping. Ray LaMontagne has you in his tractor beam. RYAN J. PRADO

THE SECRET MACHINES, THE DEARS

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) Since losing one of their original members last year, the Secret Machines have continued their brand of epic, spacey, horizon-expanding rock on their latest self-titled record, which has been released to go head to head with the spellbindingly excellent debut from School of Seven Bells, founding member Benjamin Curtis' new endeavor. The predictably huge sounds—booming drums, stratospheric guitar, vocals that throb with echo—that make up the new Secret Machines suffer more than a little in direct comparison. Meanwhile, the Dears were one of many in that Montreal explosion of bands a few years back, and their latest, Missiles, is careful, ponderous rock that skirts the edge of prog, cycling through turbulent, cloudy hues like a mood ring. NL

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