Up & Coming 

This Week's Music Previews

LUCIUS Wed 10/9, Bunk Bar

LUCIUS Wed 10/9, Bunk Bar

WEDNESDAY 10/9

WHITE TUNDRA
(LaurelThirst Public House, 2958 NE Glisan) See My, What a Busy Week!

KRONOS QUARTET
(Kaul Auditorium at Reed College, 3203 SE Woodstock) See My, What a Busy Week!

GETO BOYS, GRAY MATTERS, RAP CLASS, TRAGEDY, CASSOW
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) Read our article on the Geto Boys.

SAXON, FOZZY
(Alhambra Theatre, 4811 SE Hawthorne) Read our article on Saxon.

LUCIUS, GREAT WILDERNESS
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Haim might have just cornered the market on insanely catchy, female-vocal-driven, arena-sized, sing-along pop, but Brooklyn band Lucius is poised to give them a run for their money. Lead singers Jess Wolfe and Holly Laessig have a preternatural talent for harmonizing—although many of the most powerful moments on Wildewoman, Lucius' debut album (out October 15) come when the two sing in full-throated unison. Rounded out by multi-instrumentalists Dan Molad, Peter Lalish, and Andrew Burri, Lucius is already a mind-bogglingly good band, able to connect the dots from sparse, back-porch laments like "Go Home" to the pep-rally gem "Turn It Around." This is that magic moment when you can still see Lucius playing small rooms like Bunk Bar—trust me, it won't last. NED LANNAMANN

TERROR, FUCKED UP, POWER TRIP, CODE ORANGE KIDS
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) Tonight's double-headlining show features two aptly named pillars of the hardcore genre. My first time seeing Terror, I watched from the side as chaos erupted after a few macho tough guys in the audience were confronted for their violence. Once the dust settled, the LA band was quick to continue their set, this time with nearly twice the energy. A few years later I watched as Toronto's Fucked Up had a show cut short by police. The band was headlining a state university festival, and lead singer Damian Abraham was accused of attempting to start a riot when he went into the crowd to get the fans involved, and tore down stage barriers that were getting in the way. Shows centered on music this fast and abrasive can be difficult things to control, but both bands champion the belief that they need be built on pure positive energy to function and be enjoyed. CHIPP TERWILLIGER

TAL NATIONAL
(The Goodfoot, 2845 SE Stark) The press materials hail Tal National as "Niger's #1 band," and, honestly, I'm not up enough on that African country's scene to dispute the designation. On their latest album, Kaani, Tal National roil with an almost maniacal complexity and mantric intensity... like a more prog-rock-oriented Konono Nº1. (Both of these African groups record for England's FatCat Records.) Check the track "Banganeseba" for exhaustive proof. Niger's a cool place if music like Tal National's regularly charts. This is more boisterous than most of the highlife music I've heard and nearly as soulful as the Tuareg Desert blues made famous in the US by Bombino and Tinariwen. Work up a righteous sweat to it. DAVE SEGAL

LITTLE GREEN CARS, KRIS ORLOWSKI
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Little Green Cars played a show at the Doug Fir back in April, and for a modest crowd of curiosity seekers, the Dublin folk-pop quintet proved itself to be entirely magnetic and winning. They played open-mouthed, open-hearted teenage anthems sprinkled with just a hint of homegrown Irish sorrow to keep things from curdling. Tonight they return to play for what is certain to be a bigger crowd—no one who saw that show would miss the chance to see them again. Little Green Cars' debut album, Absolute Zero, is a not-at-all-annoying mixture of youthfulness and competence, with some really terrific songs to boot: "The John Wayne" and "Harper Lee" are much more than celebrity namedrops, and they display the band's truly spine-tingling coed harmonies. NL

THURSDAY 10/10

PLANKTON WAT, PLANETS AROUND THE SUN, GRAPEFRUIT
(Valentine's, 232 SW Ankeny) Read our article on Plankton Wat.

FALL INTO DARKNESS: NIK TURNER'S HAWKWIND, WHITE MANNA, BILLIONS AND BILLIONS, HEDERSLEBEN
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) As one of the original passengers on the otherworldly space-rock unit Hawkwind, Nik Turner has every right to use the band's name. So does guitarist Dave Brock. It's a classic case of two versions of the band floating around the stratosphere. But with Hawkwind—a band that has mutated its skronky, hippie, acid-bath space blues over the past 45 years—this isn't a bad thing. Turner, who's toured and recorded mostly under the Space Ritual moniker—headlines the opening night of this year's Fall Into Darkness, which has become one of the best heavy-rock fests in the Pacific Northwest. (Brock's version of Hawkwind, meanwhile, just postponed their US tour, citing Brock's health issues—get well, Dave!) Turner's Hawkwind will perform some choice cuts from the past, as well as selections from Turner's 2013 rock odyssey Space Gypsy. Mississippi Studios transforms into the mothership tonight. You don't want to get left behind. MARK LORE Also see My, What a Busy Week!

TIM KASHER, LAURA STEVENSON, YOU ARE PLURAL
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Tim Kasher, in his prime, at least, was a more honest and captivating songwriter than his friend, collaborator, and label-mate Conor Oberst has ever been. Even Oberst's best songs are emotionally intricate plaints masquerading as cold-blooded pop ditties—and sometimes the hooks are great, but man is he full of shit (he's sort of like an indie Billy Joel). Tim Kasher, on the other hand, actually sounds like he means it: His masterpiece is Cursive's 2000 record Domestica, a chilling concept album that ambiguously correlates to his own divorce—it's a raw and unflinchingly personal statement, and an all-time high watermark of the emo genre. Kasher's output since has been largely spotty; subsequent Cursive albums range from passable to abhorrent, although all four Good Life (Kasher's other project) albums—in addition to his solo effort from 2010, The Game of Monogamy—are well worth your time and, potentially, money. MORGAN TROPER

LUMERIANS, TJUTJUNA, SWAHILI
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) The Oakland, California, space-rock quartet Lumerians has cut to the chase with the title of its new album, The High Frontier. You can talk about the group's lysergic lope, perfect for putting your hands in your pockets and head-nodding the night away. You can point out its post-punk predilections or its steady krautrock wanderings or its occasional stoney drones. But The High Frontier is also the title coined by physicist and writer Gerard K. O'Neill for his illustrated 1976 book about human colonization of space, and Lumerians essentially aim to create a soundtrack for travels to and life on such a colony. This is space rock, and the six songs on The High Frontier are interstellar jams of the highest order, only 33 minutes long but seemingly stretching into eternity. Turn on, tune in, blast off. BEN SALMON

GUITAR WOLF, THE COATHANGERS, COWARD, NO TOMORROW BOYS
(Dante's, 350 W Burnside) Over the years, Japanese garage-rock legends Guitar Wolf have built a reputation for their frantic and relentless live show. The band has even starred as heroes in the sci-fi zombie flick Wild Zero. And with the four women that make up the Coathangers having already taken on Ramones-style surnames in the same vein as Guitar Wolf, could a movie featuring the Atlanta punk-rock band be far off? Even without any extra frills tacked on, the tale of the Coathangers works great in an Our Band Could Be Your Life sort of way. Started as a half joke at a party back in 2006, the group has since toured high and low and released some excellent music along the way. It might not be saving the world from zombies, but it's just as inspiring to see a band develop their talent and become this great out of next to nothing. CT

THE WATERBOYS, FREDDIE STEVENSON
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Formed three decades ago in Edinburgh, Scotland, the Waterboys were as much a product of punk rock as they were folk music and Springsteen. Over the course of their first three records, frontman Mike Scott perfected what would become known as "The Big Music"—full of big sound and big ideas. Since then, Scott has dabbled in stripped-down Celtic folk, dropped the Waterboys name, picked it back up, and released heaps of records that continue to embrace his vision. The band's latest, 2011's An Appointment with Mr. Yeats, marries the big music with the big words of Irish poet William Butler Yeats—a bold move, but no less bold than the sounds the Waterboys were making in 1983 that went on to influence the likes of The Joshua Tree-era U2 and Arcade Fire. ML

FRIDAY 10/11

LANGHORNE SLIM, JONNY FRITZ, NATHAN REICH
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) See My, What a Busy Week!

FALL INTO DARKNESS: ORANGE GOBLIN, HOLY GRAIL, LORD DYING, LAZUR/WULF
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Riffs on riffs on riffs on riffs. Expect nothing less from UK groove gods Orange Goblin. For 18 years now, these lords of sleaze have been releasing heavy yet catchy stoner rock with a cosmic flair. Their latest effort, A Eulogy for the Damned, is no exception, as it proved the Goblin can still rage after five years away from the studio. It's the kind of band where pre-show bong hits are a requirement. Support comes from Holy Grail, a cheese-tastic power-metal band from California that obviously overdosed at a young age on Iron Maiden and Judas Priest singles. KEVIN DIERS Also see My, What a Busy Week!

BEN DARWISH'S THE LONELY NIGHT
(Ethos/IFCC, 5340 N Interstate) Fresh off his Morning Ritual project, local keyboardist/composer Ben Darwish has prepped another ambitious piece. From the description I've heard, The Lonely Night isn't really comparable to anything else, a multimedia work anchored by 10 new songs performed by Darwish, drummer Russ Kleiner, and guitarist William Seiji Marsh. There is filmed footage to go alongside the new music—which has been described as "nocturnes" with a down-tempo R&B slant—and there's set design and lighting cues to match. The project was funded by a grant from the Regional Arts and Culture Council, and Darwish & Co. will perform it five times over the course of the weekend. Most intriguing of all, Darwish will be seated behind a 60-year-old Hammond S6 organ that has accordion-style chord buttons. I can't tell you what to expect, exactly, but the intrigue factor is sky-high. NL

DIAMOND HEAD, RAVEN, NETHER REGIONS, BLACK SNAKE
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) As a fickle music journalist, I reserve the right to flip-flop on my views and opinions. Let's face it, things change, people grow, and I've probably already contradicted myself several times in this publication anyway, so what's the harm in doing it again? The last time Diamond Head came through town, I referred to them as a "pick-up band that are turning a triumphant legacy into dollar signs." A harsh statement that was probably true then, and may be now. But really, who gives a shit? In the end, it's all about the music. And in Diamond Head's case, it's music any right-minded hesher has been worshiping since learning how to drop a needle in a groove (or type a band's name into a YouTube search). So let me lead by example: Put aside your hang-ups and let's go hear a band that can no doubt play "Am I Evil?" better than Metallica. ARIS WALES

SLEIGH BELLS, DOLDRUMS
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Sleigh Bells' debut album Treats was a revelation, blending teeny-bopper pop and brawny metal riffs. Probably because of that blend, the duo of Alexis Krause and former Poison the Well guitarist Derek Miller have also offered plenty of flat-out annoying tunes over the course of three albums, including the just-released Bitter Rivals. But there are just as many life-affirming moments in the Andrew WK-style party-slammers, too. The new album leans a little closer to a pop sheen, but not so much that Sleigh Bells can't invert the whole thing into a fist-pumping piece of mosh-pit bait. They're still sometimes really, really annoying, though. MATTHEW W. SULLIVAN

SATURDAY 10/12

FALL INTO DARKNESS: AGALLOCH, BEHOLD... THE ARCTOPUS, BOTANIST, EIGHT BELLS
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) See My, What a Busy Week!

BEN DARWISH'S THE LONELY NIGHT
(Ethos/IFCC, 5340 N Interstate) See Friday's listing.

ADAM ARCURAGI, CHEYENNE MIZE, IAN JAMES
(White Eagle, 836 N Russell) Louisville songwriter Cheyenne Marie Mize first gained notice as a member of the band Arnett Hollow and with a collaborative 10-inch record of old-timey parlor songs she recorded with Bonnie "Prince" Billy, with whom she still performs. However, Mize has established herself as a formidable talent in her own right and could happily cross those references off her résumé if she wanted; her latest album, Among the Grey, is a superb collection of moody, folk-varnished rock, beginning with a pair of craggy, almost proggy thumpers (the title track and "Wait for It") and concluding with the gossamer, string-laden piano ballad "Wouldn't Go Back." She remains a shockingly under-examined talent, and the depth conveyed on Among the Grey is startling after the sunny strum-pop she displayed on 2011's just-as-wonderful We Don't Need EP. Clear some room on the record shelf for her entire catalog; Mize deserves to become one of your all-time favorites. NL

GRAYSKUL, BAD HABITAT, GRAVES33, BAD TENANTS, DESTRO
(Blue Monk, 3341 SE Belmont) Tonight celebrates the latest full-length release from Grayskul, the Seattle duo made up of Onry Ozzborn and JFK from the Oldominion crew. Zenith racks up an impressive 18 tracks, with engineering by Portland's own Zebulon Dak. It kicks off with an extended shout-out from Wu-Tang's Raekwon, a somewhat unexpected cosign, considering the stylistic variance between the two camps. Longtime fans can rest easy, though; despite the intro, this isn't a departure into cocaine criminology raps. The subterranean diatribes for which Grayskul is known remain intact. Dark bars about scarecrows, school shootings, and social media are joined by guest appearances from recent tourmate Aesop Rock and sultry sounds from local singer Reva DeVito. Dystopia rules everything around me, dreams get it dunny, moody hoodie trill y'all. RYAN FEIGH

QUINTRON AND MISS PUSSYCAT, ZZZ, CAVE
(Dante's, 350 W Burnside) When people travel to the Northwest all the way from New Orleans, Louisiana, you should do yourself a kindness and go and see them perform. Quintron and Miss Pussycat's hard-to-define brand of "swamp-tech"—their weirdo-electro-dance-rock-soul-boogie (that usually comes complete with a puppet show)—is in a nutty world of its own. They're the kind of band that can make sense in either an art museum or strip club. Oh, and did I mention there's a puppet show? KELLY O

OVERSEAS, RADAR BROS, CHRIS BROKAW
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Convincing you to see Overseas tonight should be as simple as naming the individual members of the band: David Bazan (Pedro the Lion), Will Johnson (Centro-matic, South San Gabriel), and Matt and Bubba Kadane (Bedhead, the New Year). On the self-titled Overseas album that came out earlier this year, Bazan and Johnson's uniquely contradictory natures serve as excellent foils for each another—Bazan's fire-and-brimstone preacher remains tempered by regret and disillusionment, while Johnson's world-weary, whiskey-licked whisper can't quite conceal his inherent optimism and hope. Whether the bleak but solid Overseas will stand up to recent masterpieces like Bazan's Curse Your Branches or Centro-matic's Candidate Waltz remains to be seen, but I wouldn't count it out. NL

SUNDAY 10/13

FALL INTO DARKNESS: THE SKULL, HAMMERS OF MISFORTUNE, UZALA, MIKE SCHEIDT
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See My, What a Busy Week!

VIKESH KAPOOR, THE DESLONDES, LOS DOS AMIGOS
(Portland Playhouse, 602 NE Prescott) Read our article on Vikesh Kapoor.

BEN DARWISH'S THE LONELY NIGHT
(Ethos/IFCC, 5340 N Interstate) See Friday's listing.

MONDAY 10/14

KING KHAN AND THE SHRINES, HELL SHOVEL, THE SATIN CHAPS
(Dante's, 350 W Burnside) Though his latest, Idle No More, peers into existential heartbreak, King Khan has long been more at home as garage rock's big greasy ham—hocking half-baked slogans and sleazy innuendo, no joke is too cheap. Shameless and shirtless as sweat rolls off his mustache onto his beer belly, Khan's a natural at throwing cake and changing costumes. At Dante's in 2009, he was joined onstage by dancers with pompons, one of whom might not have been wearing underwear. And yet, confronted with such spectacle, I remained mesmerized by the band behind. They were dressed in black and relatively unadorned—eight Germans, maybe nine, all cooking together in strict, fierce counterpoint. Tight, snappy pocket rhythms, keys, horns, and auxiliary flourishes. Intertwined, ears open, playing only the right bits. They are the Shrines, from Berlin, and they crack like a whip. When their seamless, cohesive firecrackers meet Khan's cheeky shtick, a marvelous bar band is born. ANDREW R TONRY Also see My, What a Busy Week!

HORSE LORDS, REGULAR MUSIC, LEISURE LLC
(Kenton Club, 2025 N Kilpatrick) Horse Lords make the kind of amorphous, high-energy spazz-prog Baltimore's DIY music scene is famous for exporting. Evocative of a polyrhythmic Fugazi at times, or a no-wave version of Tortoise, Horse Lords have gained accolades as torchbearers of the Wham City warehouse culture and improv ethos. On the album-length song "Wildcat Strike," jams run free for a solid 21 minutes, joined by a fantastic cavalry of Pere Ubu-style sax freakouts at the end. It's fitting that Horse Lords are joined tonight by PDX's Regular Music—a mad-scientist neuro fusion of talented improvisationalists—and the warped-VHS pop of Leisure LLC, for what promises to be a melding of minds at Kenton Club. WYATT SCHAFFNER

TUESDAY 10/15

THEE OH SEES, THE BLIND SHAKE, OBN III'S
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) See My, What a Busy Week!

GWAR, WHITECHAPEL, IRON REAGAN, BAND OF ORCS
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) The Scumdogs of the Universe absorbed a major blow in 2011, when Gwar guitarist Cory Smoot, AKA Flattus Maximus, passed away unexpectedly. This year, Oderus Urungus & Co. unveiled Battle Maximus, the band's tribute to their fallen brother. It's a fun piece of goofy thrash metal, but Gwar is never going to be known for their records—not when there are politicians to decapitate, audiences to douse in fake blood, and an entire human race to enslave. It's the metal show to end all metal shows, and to further the cause, there's an online petition at change.org to get Gwar on the 2015 Super Bowl halftime show. It's attracted more than 43,000 "signatures" so far. Dare to dream. MWS

Tags:

Comments (0)

Subscribe to this thread:

Comments are closed.

From the Archives

Staff Pick Events

Most Commented On

Top Viewed Stories

All contents © Index Newspapers, LLC

115 SW Ash St. Suite 600
Portland, OR 97204

Contact Info | Privacy Policy | Production Guidelines | Terms of Use | Takedown Policy