BEARCUBBIN' Sat 3/1 Bunk Bar
Simon Boas & Julianne Rose Tunnelle

WEDNESDAY 2/26

LILACS AND CHAMPAGNE, SUN ANGLE, HOT VICTORY
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See My, What a Busy Week!

DON'T, DIVERS, NO GOOD LOVERS
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) When I first saw Divers at the Mercury's Malt Ball last year, I was stoked on how awesome they were, and also upset that I'd never seen them before. Divers find the common ground shared between classic-rock radio and British punk bands from the '70s, and are on-point and fun performers. Headlining the evening is Don't, a supergroup of seasoned Portland rockers who commandeer a crowd with Siouxie-tinged vocals and punchy, power guitar that will pump you up—even on a Wednesday night. RACHEL MILBAUER

MOONFACE, LIKE A VILLAIN
(Mission Theater, 1624 NW Glisan) On Wolf Parade's debut, principals Spencer Krug and Dan Boeckner struck a delicate, opposites-attract, yin-yang sort of balance. They've diverged since, and both are better for it. In particular, Krug's musical vocabulary is so individual, so distinct, that it deserves to be unbound, free of dilution or compromise. Unlike Boeckner's simple rockisms, there are no convenient touchstones for Krug's flutterings of fancy, his penchant for shifting keys, his blinding torrents of notes, or his dabbling in obscure time signatures, nor for his warbling, vibrato yelp, or his smoky, mythical, lyrical musings. He is at once playful and deadly serious—and at all times, in full motion. Krug moved on from Wolf Parade and from one marvelous solo project, Sunset Rubdown, to another: Moonface. 2010's "Marimba and Shit-Drums," a propulsive 20-minute song-suite played on only the titular instruments, is a masterpiece. His latest LP, Julia with Blue Jeans On, features just voice and piano, and is a more baroque affair—a collision of Krug's classical training and his singular musical mind. ANDREW R TONRY

COM TRUISE, PHANTOMS
(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) Although the flashy synth tunes of Com Truise (AKA Seth Haley) only appeared in the last few years, his sound borrows heavily from an '80s electro-pop sensibility, with beats and production techniques that sound futuristic and fresh. This makes it unsurprising that one of his remixes was featured on the Tron: Legacy Reconfigured remix album. Self-describing his music as "slow-motion funk," Com Truise has been producing beats and sounds for the last decade under various pseudonyms, starting out primarily as a drum-and-bass DJ in Upstate New York. Gaining in popularity, he promises a very danceable show for those in their post-rave phase. ROSE FINN

HANDS IN, LURES, FEN WIK REN
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) Hands In (Erick Crosby) showed up in Portland via Chicago several months ago and has put on stellar solo performances since. Using loops, pedals, guitar, and synths, Crosby makes lo-fi psychedelia with poppy bass lines and gentle, echoed vocals. His songs possess a neon fuzz and hiss, and are so light and catchy they feel classic. Boaring, his 2011 release streaming on Bandcamp, is stocked with slow surf licks and ambient Halcyon Digest-esque guitar, paired with Beatles-happy harmonies, especially on the songs "The Maniacs" and "Moment of Life." Although watching solo performances can get to the best of us, Crosby orchestrates his multitude of instruments seamlessly, with enough to watch to sustain the show. RM

THURSDAY 2/27

THE PARSON RED HEADS, NORMAN, MIKE COYKENDALL
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See My, What a Busy Week!

THE MUSICAL BOX
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Read this week's Debate Club on Genesis.

HUNGRY HUNGRY HIP HOP: LOAD B, JON BELZ, BRYCE LANG
(Mississippi Pizza Pub, 3552 N Mississippi) Load B, the Northeast Portland hiphop duo of Milc and Brill, proudly claim their unique lane as one of the grimiest groups around. Their most recent releases, Debauchery and The Scumbag Tape, are middle-finger-in-the-air collections of music with an underlying sense of humor that sweetens any of the distastefulness less talented emcees might succumb to. Conscious rap fans might dig them, but make no mistake, this is clearly on the way to unconscious rap. Jon Belz, of Chill Crew, recently released the masterfully understated solo EP Purplx, four contemplative tracks confidently spit over production by Red Velvet Beats. Bryce Lang rounds out the night with a special beat set, showcasing the fact that his crew, the Renaissance Coalition, is quietly starting to make major moves in town.  RYAN FEIGH

DEATH ANGEL, TYR, KINGDOM UNDER FIRE, REVOLUTION OVERDUE, GLADIUS
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) The '80s Bay Area thrash scene was something to behold—Exodus, Testament, Possessed, Forbidden, a little band called Metallica, and one of my favorites, Death Angel. Aside from a hiatus in the '90s, Death Angel have released a relatively steady stream of material. The band came out of retirement with 2004's The Art of Dying, which eviscerated those who thought the band wouldn't be able to keep up with a younger generation of metalheads. Death Angel have been trying to top themselves ever since. Last year's The Dream Calls for Blood was equally punishing, a classic slab of thrash in a style that has since seemingly come back in vogue. Death Angel continue to sound inspired, without attempting to chase trends. They simply do what they do, and they do it well. MARK LORE

SUBSIST, BURROW OWL, REDNECK, RECESSIONS, MORE HELL
(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) The opening notes of Subsist's 2013 self-titled cassette release are the watery rumble of a bass that is slowly taken over by the creaking grind of a guitar and a doomy drum line. From there, the Vancouver, BC-based band rages through nine short spurts of grinding punk that feel like sharp uppercuts to the jaw. The band will be working tonight in collaboration with Burrow Owl, an artist from Montreal who made one hell of a splash at last year's Pure Harsh Noise Worship Fest with a set that approximated the sound of a bandsaw making rough work of a series of shortwave radios. ROBERT HAM

TOGETHER PANGEA, MOZES AND THE FIRSTBORN
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Together Pangea had its humble beginnings in Santa Clarita as the four-track recording project of singer/guitarist William Keegan. As a trio, the band quickly established themselves as one of the rowdiest fixtures in the Los Angeles garage-rock community. Keegan has cited Pete Seeger and K Records acts like the Microphones and Little Wings as major influences, though, and they are apparent on the band's latest release, Badillac, through striking folk flourishes on songs like the anguished, forlorn "Offer" and the cello-accompanied acoustic ballad "No Way Out." Elsewhere on Badillac, the band keeps busy with the fun and melodic fist-pumpers they're known for, many of which are sure to be scorching summer playlists and firing up mosh pits for years to come. Combine these elements with some refreshing arrangements, and Together Pangea have found a unique formula that sets them apart from their often indistinguishable garage-rock peers. CHIPP TERWILLIGER

THE COUP, RISKY STAR, LOVE BOMB GO-GO, MY-G, KEV CHOICE
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) Too often, live hiphop misses the point. (Why, for instance, does Lil Wayne swap great samples and killer beats for overly busy and gratuitous drumming, six-string bass solos, and distorted power chords?) The crummy live hiphop band, however, is something that the Coup's Boots Riley seems to have solved. Part of that was writing and recording an album, Sorry to Bother You, with a live band, rather than trying to do some backward adaptation after the fact. But then, Riley's rarely one to screw up when it comes to process. He thinks shit through. Indeed, Riley is nothing if not highly aware. As much as any musician out there, particularly in the world of rap, Riley is fighting for the most radical, punk-rock, anti-capitalist populism. And he challenges staid orthodoxy, speaking on panels at colleges in the midst of touring. We need more like him. Boots for President 2016. ART

NICKI BLUHM AND THE GRAMBLERS, POLECAT
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Nicki Bluhm and the Gramblers first snuck beyond the mellowed-out Americana camp with their Van Sessions on YouTube, where they covered everything from Linda Ronstadt’s “You’re No Good” to Deniece Williams’ “Let’s Hear It for the Boy.” Since then, their version of Hall and Oates’ “I Can’t Go For That (No Can Do)” has received more than two million views, and the band recently landed a performance on Conan. The Gramblers, which include Bluhm’s husband Tim of the Mother Hips, make their own music, too. Their latest self-titled LP is filled with rootsy, ’70s-AM pop that nestles somewhere between the Band and Fleetwood Mac. It sounds like they’ve found their niche, but between the spotless musicianship and the emergence of Nicki Bluhm as a commanding frontwoman, it looks as though the sky’s the limit. ML

FRIDAY 2/28

CIBO MATTO, SALT CATHEDRAL
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) See My, What a Busy Week!

BOTTOMLESS PIT, KINSKI, CHRIS BROKAW
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our article on Bottomless Pit.

NICKI BLUHM AND THE GRAMBLERS, CARLY RITTER
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See Thursday's listing.

THRONES, PRIZEHOG, POLST
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) With most heavy rock bands in the Northwest chasing the long tail of the Melvins, the only group that seems to have caught up with Buzz and the gang long enough to take a bite off is local trio Prizehog. The band's fourth album, Re-Unvent the Whool, comes out March 4 on Eolian Empire, and it's the sound of sludge rock melting before your very ears. Each of its seven tracks is a psych-smattered firebomb covered in the goo of the group's heavily processed vocals. Little phrases or words come bubbling out of the murk, providing a bit of muddy color to the already sticky canvas. RH

LUBOMYR MELNYK
(Yale Union, 800 SE 10th) Finding a genre distinction with which to frame the music of Lubomyr Melnyk is a difficult task. The Ukranian-born musician—often cited as the world's fastest pianist, capable of playing 19.5 notes per second with each hand simultaneously—could fall very easily under the contemporary classical fold, as his work feels like an extension of the melodic principles set forth by composers like Arnold Schoenberg and Philip Glass. But there's a fluidity to his work that allows him to find a comfortable home among the post-rock community as well, especially when looking at The Watchers, his 2013 collaboration with guitarist James Blackshaw that finds the musicians blending melodic figures together into a complex tapestry. Whatever box you want to place Melnyk in, the bigger picture remains that he's a rare talent and one worthy of witnessing in person at this, his first-ever performance in Portland. RH

SATURDAY 3/1

LUCK-ONE, MIKEY VEGAZ, ILLMACULATE
(Blue Monk, 3341 SE Belmont) See My, What a Busy Week!

AGES AND AGES, FANNO CREEK, US LIGHTS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our article on Ages and Ages.

BATTLEME, PHANTOM SHIPS
(Club 21, 2035 NE Glisan) Read our article on Battleme.

BEARCUBBIN', RAGS AND RIBBONS, TALKATIVE
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Local instrumental math rockers Bearcubbin' have a new record for your ears, and it's filled with colored bricks of sound that move faster than anything in The Lego Movie. The album, titled Girls with Fun Haircuts, contains nine tracks of zooming, dizzy interplay, built upon repeating loops and dropkick sounds. Instead of sounding overly flashy or solipsistic, Bearcubbin' inject a firm sense of fun and a physicality to their puzzles of sound. It's all due to the watertight playing of the trio, which consists of guitarist/keyboardist Chris Scott, bassist Patrick Dougherty, and drummer Mike Byrne (who also drums for some band called the Smashing Pumpkins). NED LANNAMANN

EZZA ROSE, REBECCA MARIE MILLER
(The Old Church, 1422 SW 11th) Without context, Poolside might seem like a curious title for Ezza Rose's new record. It's a high, lonesome listen, its stark arrangement showcasing her clear, powerful voice above all. Poolside is dream-like and fairly gorgeous, but one of the last things it brings to mind is sitting by the pool. As it turns out, the title couldn't be more accurate: The collection was recorded entirely in the abandoned basement swimming-pool space of a historic downtown hotel. The reverb heard throughout? Courtesy of ancient ceramic tiles. The late-night vibe? Also real and by necessity, with post-11 pm recording sessions scheduled to avoid the thunder of the streetcars above. Rose celebrates Poolside with a full band and a pew-side set at the Old Church, a venue with no shortage of history in its own right. JEREMY PETERSEN

SUNDAY 3/2

BENEFIT FOR HOLLAND ANDREWS: AU, 1939 ENSEMBLE, KYLE MORTON AND SHANNON STEELE
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) See My, What a Busy Week!

SKINNY PUPPY, BAAL
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) English author Neil Gaiman once wrote, "Hell may have all the best composers, but heaven has all the best choreographers." For reasons beyond my understanding, I tend to gravitate more toward evil music, so I completely agree. Despite Gaiman's stance, Canadian electro-industrial pioneers Skinny Puppy walk the line between the two realms. Visually, their most recent endeavor, Weapon, looks as menacing as any black or death metal record. The innards, however, tell a much different story. Track for track, Weapon is a bleak, trance-inducing boogie machine. It's harsh and creepy, but just upbeat enough to inspire gyration. Heaven might end up being slightly jealous of the sweaty mess of black vinyl and tangled fishnets that will certainly crowd the dance floor at this show. ARIS WALES

RIO GRANDS, SMOKEY BRIGHTS
(Rontoms, 600 E Burnside) There are two versions of Rio Grands' debut album. The cassette edition of A-Z contains 26 tracks, one for each letter of the alphabet. Each song bears a girl's name, from "Angel" to "Beverly" to "Xylia" to "Zooey." And each one is a sunny, warm, breezy pop song that evokes piña coladas and white tuxedos. (The abridged digital version of A-Z cherry-picks 12 highlights; sorry, "Ursula," you did not make the cut.) The ambitious recording project of Colin Jenkins is more Wilson brothers than yacht rock, though, with '60s beachside color and plenty of tropical flair; and tonight's record release show is an affordable substitute for a trip down to the islands. NL

CASKET GIRLS, STARGAZER LILIES, DOTT, DREAMEND
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) The original "casket girls," so-called for the coffin-shaped boxes that held their belongings, were recruited from France and sent to the New World to become wives to the settlers of the Louisiana colonies in the 18th century. Their mysterious backgrounds and perceived mysticism have made for centuries of lore. Nearly as enigmatic as their namesakes are Savannah, Georgia's Casket Girls—made up of the Greene sisters, Phaedra and Elsa, along with Ryan Graveface (Black Moth Super Rainbow, Dreamend). The trio crafts off-kilter but irresistible dark pop on their recently released second album, True Love Kills the Fairy Tale. Fueled by a love for '60s girl groups, Graveface convinced the initially reluctant sisters to help him fulfill that vision, and hints of the influence can be found among the glorious bombast of cuts like "Secular Love" and "Same Side." The Casket Girls come to town fresh off an accident that totaled their tour van earlier this month, making your wise decision to buy a ticket almost as important for their future as it is for yours. JP

MONDAY 3/3

DR. DOG, SAINT RICH
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

REAL ESTATE, THE SHILOHS, THE SAN ONOFRE LIZARDS
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Days, the 2011 album by New Jersey band Real Estate, might not be your best musical bet if you need to get pumped up for a big-time boxing match or something like that. But if you're looking for 40 seamless minutes of beautifully languid indie-pop, it's undeniably the right choice. It's also a grower; two-plus years after its release, Real Estate's second record sounds more charming and comely than ever. Which makes Real Estate's album number three, Atlas—out on Domino the day after tonight's Portland show—one of the most hotly anticipated albums of 2014. And it delivers: 10 tracks of gentle, jangling guitar-pop music, exquisitely crafted with earworm melody after earworm melody sighed seemingly just for you. In other words, Atlas is gorgeous. Is it as great as its predecessor? Only time will tell. BEN SALMON

DALE EARNHARDT JR. JR., CHAD VALLEY
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) If bands were cars, Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr. would be more of a late-'90s Miata than a stock car. Originally just a couple of dudes playing around with keyboards in their Detroit basement, Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr. has turned into a full-fledged four-piece touring band with a following and media praise. Often mimicking the vocal harmonization and indie danceability of Of Montreal, Dale plays the indie-pop card to its fullest extent. Their most recent album, The Speed of Things, maintains their sweet, old-school Beach Boys style with trippy electro beats and noises that make you wonder what decade you're in, while instructing you how to dance your way through it. ROSE FINN

TUESDAY 3/4

PORTLAND CELLO PROJECT, THE ALIALUJAH CHOIR
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) See My, What a Busy Week!

DIANE CLUCK, SONDRA SUN-ODEON
(Blue Monk, 3341 SE Belmont) Read our article on Diane Cluck.