Up & Coming 

This Week's Music Previews

TEMPLES Thurs 4/10 Star Theater

TEMPLES Thurs 4/10 Star Theater

WEDNESDAY 4/9

NEW BUMS, SCOUT NIBLETT
(Lola's Room, 1332 W Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

SMOKE RINGS, LOVE AND CARING, COCKEYE, DEFECT DEFECT
(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) See All-Ages Action!

FACTORY FLOOR, DVA DAMAS
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Factory Floor.

ISKA DHAAF, HUSTLE AND DRONE, DJ COCO LOUIE
(Information Warehouse, 411 SE 6th) Iska Dhaaf's hometown is already all abuzz about them—Macklemore even appeared in their second music video—but this is the Seattle band's first time playing Portland. If you aren't familiar, perhaps you knew its two members in other configurations: Nate Quiroga, who plays guitar, bass, and keys, was in Mad Rad, while drummer Benjamin Verdoes fronted Mt. St. Helens Vietnam Band (while drumming, Verdoes also plays keys and sets off all manner of foot triggers to flesh out the duo's sound). Their debut album, Even the Sun Will Burn, is both fully contemporary and decidedly uninterested in current trends; its assorted parts could have come from any one of the last 20 years of indie rock (including this one). And there's a particular Northwest sensibility that's trickier to put into words: poppy, melancholic, loud, rain-dipped, and lightly, almost gently psychotic. It covers both dance and rock while fortunately evading "dance rock" territory; it's filled with hooks and weird left turns; it's very good. NED LANNAMANN

GIFT OF GAB, SPEAKER MINDS, BAD HABITAT, DIRTY REVIVAL COLLECTIVE
(Alhambra Theatre, 4811 SE Hawthorne) Some know Timothy Parker, AKA Gift of Gab, as the voice of Bay Area rap duo Blackalicious, while others know him for his semi-fast, instantly recognizable flow. Mr. Gab has participated in numerous collaborations; you can hear him rhyming alongside Chali 2na, performing with Mr. Lif, and on a record with Del the Funky Homosapien. Gift of Gab is a founding member of the Quannum Projects collective, one of the most successful indie hiphop labels to come out of the Bay Area. Not to mention that Blackalicious is great, with songs that are more melodic and structured than those of your average DJ/emcee duo; the choruses are often sung, and Gift of Gab's words are thoughtful and evocative. It's hard not to bask in the glow of Gab's mad flow. ROSE FINN

I AM THE AVALANCHE, DIAMOND YOUTH, TURNOVER, WHEN WE TEAM UP, NON THE YES MAN
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) In the highly saturated world of saccharine-coated pop punk, I Am the Avalanche's Vinnie Caruana is a true forefather. The Alternative Press-featured buzz bands of today—like the Wonder Years, Four Year Strong, Man Overboard, and even current tour mates Diamond Youth—have Caruana and his first band, the Movielife, to thank for blurring the lines between hardcore and pop punk, tossing the breakdown-heavy songwriting style of hardcore with the heart-on-sleeve writing style of, say, Blink-182, creating what Metalsucks writer Sergeant D refers to as "easycore." Though not nearly as influential, his current band I Am the Avalanche doesn't stray far from the sing-along-ready style of yesteryear. KEVIN DIERS

THURSDAY 4/10

CHVRCHES, SUMMER CANNIBALS
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

TEMPLES, DROWNERS
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) We might imagine Temples riding from the UK into town on a magic carpet of crushed velvet, incense trailing, propelled by moptops and fairly massive hype. They arrive just ahead of an appearance at Coachella and a slew of summer festival dates, not to mention ringing endorsements from Johnny Marr and Noel Gallagher, among others, all of which makes Temples a suddenly large target for the ever-present haters. Shot from Bolan's zip gun, they took the elevator to the 13th floor, kept going until they were eight miles high, finally coming to land in the sky somewhere near Lucy and her diamonds—or that seems to be the gist among disparaging critics. Fair enough, but a band could do worse. Just try and deny the charming, harmonious bombast of lead single "Shelter Song," which first piqued stateside interest last year. That's the way their album Sun Structures opens, and it paves the way for the no less infectious "Keep in the Dark" and "Mesmerise" on what is an incredibly accomplished debut. JEREMY PETERSEN

LITTLE DRAGON, UNKNOWN MORTAL ORCHESTRA
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) The breadth of Little Dragon's neo-soul electronica makes you wonder how the band ever could have been relegated to underground status, as they were prior to the release of their self-titled 2007 debut. The Gothenburg, Sweden, foursome's 10 years of obscurity must have helped to hone the group's singular grasp of dreamy, danceable pop, which is made all the more engaging by the endearing, elastic vocals of Yukimi Nagano. Little Dragon's new album, Nabuma Rubberband, isn't out until May 13, but previews of tracks like "Klapp Klapp" find the band delving into dancier synth-funk territory, à la the New Power Generation or even Janet Jackson. Following the band's performance for the Soul'd Out fest, Little Dragons dive headfirst into the maw of the festival circuit, with sets at Coachella and later this summer at Bonnaroo. RYAN J. PRADO

AND AND AND, BRITE LINES, TIBURONES
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) This show is finally happening! After postponing the original date due to Snowpacalypse Y2K14, tonight's bill brings together some of Portland's most prized musicians with promising up-and-comers from Seattle. Brite Lines' heartfelt, angsty folk is sprinkled with gentle melodies and wistful lyrics, falling somewhere between Andrew Bird and the Postal Service. They are an unexpected yet complementary match for headliners And And And, whose kinetic, tortured rock 'n' roll always leaves a crowd sweaty and rowdy. Rounding out the evening is Tiburones, whose powerful, dynamic folk is enough to silence any room. RACHEL MILBAUER

PETER CASE, COUNT KELLAM, STEVE WILKINSON
(Dante's, 350 W Burnside) Peter Case was the crux of two legendary second-wave power-pop bands: the Nerves, alongside drummer Paul Collins and guitarist Jack Lee; and later the Plimsouls, a slightly-less-legendary group best remembered for the hit "A Million Miles Away." (The Plimsouls also have a wealth of equally noteworthy material—namely, every song off the group's self-titled 1981 debut.) In 1986, Case ditched the Chelsea boots for a stupid fedora, and reintroduced himself to the music-buying public as a "mature solo artist"—often a dubious decision for reputable pop craftsmen—but the resulting eponymous LP is a star-studded (T-Bone Burnett! Roger McGuinn! Van Dyke Parks!) melange of styles that remains one of the most unjustly forgotten-about albums in the annals of pop. MORGAN TROPER

FRIDAY 4/11

THE VON TRAPPS, CHARMIAN CARR, PINK MARTINI, OREGON SYMPHONY
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) See My, What a Busy Week!

AAN, GHOST TO FALCO, DRAGGING AN OX THROUGH WATER
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Read our article on Ghost to Falco.

OFF!, CEREBRAL BALLZY, NASA SPACE UNIVERSE
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) See All-Ages Action!

SHOOK TWINS, STEVE POLTZ
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our article on Shook Twins.

MØTRIK, HEDERSLEBEN, TONEN
(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) I haven't heard all of the new album from local krautrock practitioners Møtrik, but the two songs on their Bandcamp are great: trance-inducingly repetitive, Autobahn-worthy extendo-jams. The synths buzz and coruscate, the guitars chunk-a-chunk, the bass runs like clockwork, and the drums don't have time for your bullshit. Tonight the Portland band—whose ranks include members of Wow and Flutter, Dweller at the Threshold, and Rio Grands—release their mysterious album on vinyl, and will no doubt offer a live version of their Neu!-influenced spectacle, devoid of unnecessary frills like lyrics and chord changes. The night is rounded out by Bay Area band Hedersleben, who've backed Hawkwind's Nik Turner and are therefore no strangers to zone-out abyss-gazing psych. NL

GEORGE STRAIT, CHRIS YOUNG
(Moda Center, 1 Center Ct) Fresh off being named Entertainer of the Year at the 2014 Academy of Country Music Awards, George Strait's long-running tenure as one of the few country artists not to succumb to the pop-country claw is as relevant as ever. Anyone who grew up in an even moderately rural locale during the 1980s will recognize Strait's performance of the Sanger D. Shafer tune "All My Ex's Live in Texas"; it's as ubiquitous in country music as Stetsons and Justin boots. Now in his early 60s, Strait's streak of chart-topping ballads has reached massive proportions; he's ranked third behind Elvis Presley and the Beatles for the greatest number of gold and platinum albums in the US. During this second leg of the Cowboy Rides Away Tour, Strait's massive legacy of maintaining the sanctity of a genre too often muddied by shitty Toby Keith songs will be given our city's largest stage. RJP

ALEXANDER ROBOTNICK, SOFT METALS, MAXX BASS, MIKIE LIXX
(Blue Monk, 3341 SE Belmont) Want to know a primary source for the Italians Do It Better crew's glitter disco? Jump online and dial up Alexander Robotnick's "Problèmes d'amour." It's a tad sunnier than Chromatics, but the template of analog synths and crisp dance beats are present and accounted for. After that track's release in 1983, the Italian electro master (real name: Maurizio Dami) abandoned his signature sound for a stretch, choosing to explore African and Indian music. Over the past decade, though, Robotnick has returned to his roots, producing new collections and 12-inch singles of vintage-sounding Italo disco. He makes a rare visit to Portland this week, and will perform live as well as offering up a pumping house/electro DJ set. ROBERT HAM

SAINTS OF BASS: ANDREW BOIE, PHIDELITY, BAD PIONEER
(Central Hotel, 8608 N Lombard) Meticulous and diverse in his track selection, Phidelity (Kris Northern) is a musical force to be reckoned with, unearthing hidden gems of psychedelic electronica in each mix. The Portland electronic artist's rich tapestry of sounds embodies exquisite, overlooked frequencies and pays close attention to the space between sounds. Northern knits together his own brilliant compositions with those of others, moving seamlessly between multiple dance music genres to create a spectacular form of aural escapism. Also performing is Andrew Boie, equally dedicated to his craft and bestowing upon us his treasure trove of house and techno vinyl, sure to appease your wildest foot-stomping pleasures. CHRISTINA BROUSSARD

ODESZA, D33J, KODAK TO GRAPH
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) A few things about Odesza: (1) They're a production duo that met while attending Western Washington University. (2) They're named after a ship that sank and left one of the members' uncles as one of two survivors. (3) They make the kind of instrumental electronic that's incredibly popular right now—all nostalgic-sounding, pitched-up-or-down R&B/pop vocal samples and ambient textures with deep, sweeping bass lines and syncopated programmed drums. Fortunately, they avoid sounding like typical Soundcloud trend-hoppers thanks to the undeniable quality of both 2012's Summer's Gone album and last year's My Friends Never Die EP. Florida producer Kodak to Graph and LA Anticon/WeDidIt member D33J are fitting openers that should keep the vibers vibing from the start. MIKE RAMOS

THE CALEB KLAUDER COUNTRY BAND, CAHALEN MORRISON AND COUNTRY HAMMER
(The Spare Room, 4830 NE 42nd) After you've wrapped things up at the George Strait show—or if you've decided to skip it altogether—scoot those cowboy boots over to the dance floor at the Spare Room, where the Caleb Klauder Country Band reigns supreme. The outfit, led by Klauder of Foghorn Stringband, traffics in all vintages of country, but keeps mostly to a stripped-down rock 'n' roll-inflected style that's perfect for twirling a partner. It's lean, powerful, and authentic, and I guarantee you it's the perfect cap to the workweek. Seattle songwriter Cahalen Morrison brings his new band Country Hammer to open things up, offering a tight honky-tonk sound that's ideal for downing boilermakers and working up a sweat. NL

SATURDAY 4/12

THE VON TRAPPS, CHARMIAN CARR, PINK MARTINI, OREGON SYMPHONY
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) See My, What a Busy Week!

CULT LEADER, YAUTJA, SLOTHS, LOW SKY
(Laughing Horse Books, 12 NE 10th) See All-Ages Action!

ILLMACULATE, NACHO PICASSO, CASSOW, LOAD B, COOL NUTZ, DJ FATBOY
(Alhambra Theatre, 4811 SE Hawthorne) The last time North Portland emcee Illmaculate was scheduled to perform in town, an overwhelming presence from the Portland police department's Gang Task Force caused him to shut the show down. As a result, Illmaculate became the local hiphop community's de facto spokesman, going so far as to challenge police Sgt. Pete Simpson about the incident on OPB radio. Tonight, Illmaculate belatedly celebrates the release of his latest full-length, Clay Pigeons, a 20-track tour de force that cements the power of his artistry for anyone who has the audacity to label him as just another battle rapper. Local emcees Milc (from Load B) and Cassow are among the featured artists on Clay Pigeons, and tonight they support Illmac as opening acts, alongside Seattle's Nacho Picasso. RYAN FEIGH Also see My, What a Busy Week!

JENNY HVAL, MARK MCGUIRE
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Mark McGuire's new album Along the Way is a concept album, but that concept is a slippery one: "A sonic exploration of the inner self," according to press materials. "An odyssey through the vast, unknown regions of the mind," say the liner notes. Before I read that, I thought Along the Way sounded like the soundtrack for a strange trip though some boundless, brightly lit terrarium, where soaring new-age synth bubbles, temperate rhythmic currents, and glassy, psychedelectronic shoots and ladders carry you through a digi-world of soothing pinks and wide-eyed greens. But now, I just think McGuire knew what he was going for and he nailed it. Gorgeous and glitchy, Along the Way is comfort food for that certain special gray matter in your life. BEN SALMON

SUNDAY 4/13

THE VON TRAPPS, CHARMIAN CARR, PINK MARTINI, OREGON SYMPHONY
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) See My, What a Busy Week!

LOMA PRIETA, FUCKING INVINCIBLE, U SCO, CARRION SPRING
(Laughing Horse Books, 12 NE 10th) See All-Ages Action!

BERRI TXARRAK, ORDER OF THE GASH, APE MACHINE
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) Read our article on Berri Txarrak.

SAY HI, BIG SCARY
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Say Hi's 2011 album Um, Uh Oh was a marvelous bummer of a record, a self-pitying, morose, solipsistic collection of pop so effervescently mopey that wallowing in its sad-guy hooks was downright irresistible. Eric Elbogen—the man behind the moniker, shortened from Say Hi to Your Mom for some reason—has a new Say Hi record on the way, but Endless Wonder won't be out on Barsuk until June 17, so this tour serves as a taster of sorts. Endless Wonder's lead single "Such a Drag" stows away Um, Uh Oh's acoustic guitars in favor of a more mechanized groove, which could sound like a return to Elbogen's earlier, synthier work as Say Hi, but the tune is darker, glossier, angrier. Expect an evening of scowling, furrowed-brow love songs that are difficult to say bye to. NL

SCHOOLBOY Q, ISAIAH RASHAD, VINCE STAPLES
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) Schoolboy Q has called his major label debut Oxymoron alternately "classic" and "crazy." Time will tell whether the former label sticks, but the latter should be apparent to anyone following current trends in hiphop. Conceived with a cadre of producers including Pharrell, de facto Odd Future leader Tyler, the Creator, and trap-leaning DJ Dahl, the album is stylistically daring, including touches of house music, a bit of Wu Tang grit, and tracks that feel as if they were conceived on Jordan Belfort-like doses of Quaaludes. Schoolboy is nimble enough to respond to each turn, leaning in to the skids, bringing to life his tales of drug slinging and his rise to the top of the rhyme game. RH

MONDAY 4/14

THE AFGHAN WHIGS, EARLY WINTERS
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

BIG BLACK CLOUD, CCR HEADCLEANER, DESTRUCTION UNIT, UNIFRIED
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) Destruction Unit is the sort of band that needs to be seen live to be fully appreciated. That feels like a strange thing to say, especially given the strengths of Void and Deep Trip, the pair of albums released by the Phoenix psych-punk band last year. While those albums did an excellent job of harnessing their spaced-out guitar rock in all its ear-bleeding glory, getting to witness the band's piercing feedback and distortion and slowly tromp the noise into one relentlessly catchy repeating riff after another is a mesmerizing sight to behold. When singer/guitarist Ryan Rousseau took a hard fall from the Mississippi Studios stage last year, the rest of the band were too busy spinning and twisting in their own zones to take notice. CHIPP TERWILLIGER

CHROMEO, TOKIMONSTA
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Listening to Chromeo won't offer any sort of enlightenment, but there are worse ways to spend an evening than in the white-leather-glove grip of the Montreal disco-funk duo. Yes, they've tackily named their upcoming record White Women (ugh, you guys), which indicates the level of intellect and intimacy involved. But its advance singles—which include the transistor-radio-ready "Jealous (I Ain't with It)" and the Tory y Moi duet "Come Alive"—are witless, illuminated-dance-floor fun. Since it doesn't look like Daft Punk will be stopping by any time soon, a night out with Chromeo is a decent enough facsimile. Just make sure you have a friend who knows where you are. NL

TUESDAY 4/15

GRAVEYARD, BOMBUS
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) See My, What a Busy Week!

GHOUL, IRON REAGAN, OCCULTIST, MOLDY CASTLE
(Branx, 320 SE 2nd) See All-Ages Action!

QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE, MOISTBOYZ
(Keller Auditorium, 222 SW Clay) Josh Homme took an extended break from his rock machine Queens of the Stone Age before firing it back up last year with ...Like Clockwork. The record—which brought back QOTSA veterans Dave Grohl and Nick Oliveri in limited roles—could have been a fiasco. It wasn't. In fact, it was one of their best, an album that took QOTSA's heavy rock into the 21st century. Homme & Co. are one of the few hard-rock bands standing that have one foot in commercial appeal and the other in critical acceptance. In today's fly-by-night music landscape, that's saying quite a lot. And by the looks of things, Queens of the Stone Age are far from done. MARK LORE

TINARIWEN, THE MELODIC
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Tinariwen's Grammy-winning 2011 album Tassili was famously recorded deep in a craggy Algerian national park, away from the professional studios where the band had, for years, recorded its intoxicating desert blues. And when it came time to make the follow-up, political unrest in Tinariwen's home country of Mali forced the group—Tuareg musicians descended from Saharan nomads—to again look elsewhere. They landed in Joshua Tree, California, where they built a studio inside a large house so all members could gather in one room and capture their dense, dusky sound in the most natural and organic way possible. The result, Emmaar, is a stunner, in which roiling hand drums burble beneath gentle electric-guitar drones and warm incantations on desert life and the strife in Mali. It's a formula Tinariwen has been working for decades, and it sounds as vibrant and vital as ever. BS

Tags:

Comments (0)

Subscribe to this thread:

Comments are closed.

From the Archives

Staff Pick Events

Most Commented On

Top Viewed Stories

All contents © Index Newspapers, LLC

115 SW Ash St. Suite 600
Portland, OR 97204

Contact Info | Privacy Policy | Production Guidelines | Terms of Use | Takedown Policy