CHINCHILLA Fri 4/18 East End

WEDNESDAY 4/16

DJ QUESTLOVE, MOON HOOCH, STEVEN VAUGHN KRAY
(Alhambra Theatre, 4811 SE Hawthorne) See My, What a Busy Week!

GOAT, HOLY WAVE
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Read our article on Goat.

SLOW MUSIC, THE HUMANS
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Slow Music.

THOU, CLOUD RAT, O PAON, DRUDEN
(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) If you like heavy music, you must go see Thou tonight at Slabtown. Because who knows when you’ll have a chance to do so again? A note on the Louisiana-based band’s website says touring is “logistically harsh” for Thou because its members live in far-flung places, one of them hates long jaunts, and they’re “all relatively poor.” Of course, scarcity is just part of the draw for tonight’s show. The other is Thou’s music, a punishing blend of lurching, atmospheric sludge and Bryan Funck’s blackened howl. The fiercely DIY band’s new album Heathen is equal parts melodic and harrowing, and its lyrics read like scriptures of suffering and subjugation. “Rejoice in the miseries of life unkind,” Funck screams in “Ode to Physical Pain,” which is every bit as bleak as its title. “Here, and only here, are the senses stretched and contracted.” Go. Rejoice with Thou. And then support these folks and buy some merch. BEN SALMON Also see All-Ages Action!

CHRIS SPEED TRIO, BLUE CRANES
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Former Seattle resident Chris Speed is, like most great jazz players, always in demand, constantly busy recording and performing live. And on either clarinet or tenor sax, he's able to wander the worlds between the genre's freeform expressions and its more traditional modes. With his latest trio, Speed keeps things tuned toward the latter. The recently released album Really OK—recorded with bassist Chris Tordini and the Bad Plus drummer Dave King—is a smashing post-bop collection that matches Speed's original compositions with great renditions of tracks written by fellow sax players Ornette Coleman and John Coltrane, as well as an austere take on the standard "All of Me." ROBERT HAM

CARAVAN PALACE, BOMBINO, MEDIUM TROY
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) In 2009, Sublime Frequencies released their second volume of Music from Niger: Guitars from Agadez, which for many Western audiences was the introduction to the Tuareg guitarist known as Bombino. That compilation, credited to Group Bombino, included a collection of meditative acoustic tracks and a set of electric live performances. The recordings felt like a revelation, a lost desert-blues classic in the vein of Ali Farka Touré or Tinariwen. Two years later, Bombino released his first proper studio album, Agadez, a record that doubled down on the trance-like, cyclical, precise guitar work he'd already introduced, adding elements of psych-rock and supplementing traditional tracks with his own politically charged songs. Last year, Bombino traveled to Nashville to record with the Black Keys' Dan Auerbach, and the resulting Nomad fuses those hypnotic grooves with the sort of fuzzed-out blues and occasional funk licks that makes aspiring guitarists wonder why they even bother. MATTHEW W. SULLIVAN

PHONE CALL, MAGIC FADES, RAP CLASS, DJ PORTIA
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) The word "sultry" comes to mind when listening to Portland electro-funk duo Phone Call. "Derivative" is a less accurate descriptor, especially seeing as how the former Strength members have a stranglehold on a shoegaze/R&B/chillwave hybrid that's uniquely cultivated. Bailey Winters and Johnny Zeigler hatched the project in 2012, hoping to combine the melodic interplay of Prince and Justin Timberlake with heavy hiphop beats, culminating in a nearly instant connection with those showgoers who prefer to get as sweaty as possible. Outside of a few songs posted online, the band still seems largely unknown, though that is likely to change with the release of their debut album, currently in production. Far from phoning it in, KPSU has hit the nail on the head with this lineup for their fundraiser. RYAN J. PRADO

FAUN FABLES, PWRHAUS, ARRINGTON DE DIONYSO
(The Old Church, 1422 SW 11th) Faun Fables' otherworldly folk music time-travels from medieval England to the prairies of the American frontier to the campfire at a black metal festival. Known to incorporate theater, performance art, and puppet shows into their concerts, Faun Fables are a band always worth seeing—if only for the sake of surprise. Tonight's opening acts offer equal amounts of mysterious possibility. Former Old Time Relijun frontman Arrington de Dionysio's shows can range from meditative flute solos, to William Blake poems throat-sung in Indonesian, to tai chi freak-dance parties. And local band Pwrhaus' set will include new songs they wrote specifically for the venue. It's hard to say what this show will be like, but it will certainly be unlike other shows—probably in the best possible way. JOSHUA JAMES AMBERSON

ARLO GUTHRIE
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Arlo Guthrie's career began in 1967—the same year his legendary father Woody Guthrie passed away—with Alice's Restaurant. That album is a lopsided opus featuring the truly great, 18-minute "Alice's Restaurant Massacree" (which has come to be considered the best—perhaps only—"Thanksgiving song," even if the holiday couldn't be further from the song's focus) on one side and a bunch of blithe folk filler on the other. While the younger Guthrie's canon obviously lacks the social ramifications and staying power of his father's, Alice's Restaurant is one of the only hippie anthems that's not completely confined to its date of conception—it's a dexterous and often funny anti-war ditty that genuinely never bores. Just stay away from the goddamn movie.... MORGAN TROPER

KING PARROT, VATTNET VISKAR
(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) Wild-eyed Australian thrash/grind demons King Parrot will headline tonight's show, but fans of more nuanced metal should arrive in time for Vattnet Viskar, a youngish New Hampshire band that put out a stunning album, Sky Swallower, last year for metal super-label Century Media Records. At eight tracks and nearly 40 minutes, Sky Swallower uses black metal as a base camp for forays into skyscraping post-rock, chest-caving death metal, thunderous doom, and, occasionally, fractured folk and noisy drone. It's an impressive, genre-blind artistic statement from a killer up-and-coming band that deserves an audience tonight. BS

THURSDAY 4/17

URAL THOMAS AND THE PAIN, SHIRLEY NANETTE, ANCIENT HEAT
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

THE ORB, NORDIC SOUL
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) It has been 23 years since the Orb's breakthrough ambient house anthem "Little Fluffy Clouds," but time hasn't dulled this British electronic outfit's approach to sound and production. The group's last two releases were tripped-out dub experiments, blazed into being with the guiding light of collaborator Lee "Scratch" Perry. And their live sets are still massive beasts that allow downtempo, house, reggae, and experimental electronica to find a strange and colorful common ground. The group is joined tonight by DJ Nordic Soul, a Seattle mainstay who fuses laptop house and electro productions with live instruments and boundless energy. RH

FRIDAY 4/18

KPSU KRUISE: MAGIC MOUTH, ORQUESTRA PACIFICO TROPICAL
(Portland Spirit, SW Salmon & Naito) See My, What a Busy Week!

GIRLS ROCK CAMP FUNDRAISER: CHINCHILLA, CRYPTOBEBELEM, MUTINY MUTINY
(East End, 203 SE Grand) I entirely missed Chinchilla the first time around, but the San Diego four-piece is reuniting for three West Coast gigs, including tonight's fundraiser for Portland's Rock 'n' Roll Camp for Girls, which will serve as their first show in 17 years. The all-female group—Sioban Dixon, Morgan Doctor, Krista Kansas, and Julie D—released 101 Italian Hits back in 1996, an album that sounds downright revolutionary now. Slow-burning tangles of crunch meander down unorthodox pathways, and while I wouldn't call it math or metal (two words that seem to pop up in descriptions of the band, for some reason), it's not grunge or riot grrrl either. Rather, Chinchilla found a firebrand middle ground between these arbitrary genre barriers, and made rock that was as powerful as it was instinctual. Tonight is a once-in-a-lifetime chance to revisit a past that was nearly forgotten. NED LANNAMANN

GODFLESH, CUT HANDS, HOUSE OF LOW CULTURE, LA FIN ABSOLUTE DU MONDE
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) Justin Broadrick helped codify an entire subgenre of metal by appearing on just one half of an album. As an early member of Napalm Death, he played guitar on Scum, one of grindcore's earliest templates, but he was only in the lineup that recorded side one. Before you could flip over to side two, Broadrick had already moved on to the next thing. With Godflesh, he traded breakneck speed for methodical and plodding industrial-metal. The result was a decade-plus of innovation, blending elements of techno, dub, and occasionally hiphop with metal in a way that sounded way better than it does on paper. Broadrick played in a slew of projects after Godflesh, most notably Jesu, but he reanimated Godflesh with co-founder G.C. Green back in 2010. Some visa snafus caused the band to reschedule their stateside shows late last year (remember that government shutdown business?), so Godflesh's first US tour since 1996 had to wait a little longer. MWS

SATURDAY 4/19

RECORD STORE DAY
(Various locations) See My, What a Busy Week!, and Music News.

THE MEN, GUN OUTFIT
(Dante's, 350 W Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

SLICK RICK, RISKY STAR, EVVNFLOW, DIRTY REVIVAL
(Alhambra Theatre, 4811 SE Hawthorne) Read our article on Slick Rick.

THE BUGS, THE GRAND STYLE ORCHESTRA
(Turn! Turn! Turn!, 8 NE Killingsworth) Hooray for the Bugs! They're Portland's best band, if you like junky trash slop-pop, and who doesn't? The Bugs' latest slab of vinyl is the marvelous The Right Time, 17 instantaneous tracks that vary in tempo and fidelity, each scarcely more than a minute long. All of them contain some little nugget of melody that will roll around in your addled brain like a piece of sour candy. With tunes like "Tickle Time for the Reaper," "Divorced," and "Nobody Makes a Monkey out of Me," this is as fun and catchy as music gets, and if you can't find the brilliance in these pop masterworks, you're probably boring and your haircut costs too much. The Bugs play a record-release show for The Right Time tonight at new record bar Turn! Turn! Turn!, and it'll be the bash of the ages... or, at least, the weekend. NL

SHAKEY GRAVES, CRUSHED OUT
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) I first encountered Shakey Graves' music at Pickathon last summer. I was on the shady path leaving the woods and heard the strong plucking of a banjo, accompanied by husky, faraway vocals. The one-man band from Texas has a comforting, familiar feel, like summer evenings spent on porches sipping whiskey, with simply strummed blues chords and stripped-down, sentimental lyrics. Graves—AKA Alejandro Rose-Garcia—is not reinventing folk or country, but brings a captivating genuineness with him onstage, and is definitely worth seeing live. Both early and late shows are sold out, but you might want to check Craigslist. RACHEL MILBAUER

LADY SINGS THE BLUES: A TRIBUTE TO BILLIE HOLIDAY
(Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta) Siren Nation is a collective that has been integral in the empowerment of female artists in the Northwest, increasing the visibility of their work throughout the year, as well as during their annual Siren Nation Festival. To support their gallant efforts, they've wrangled some of our favorite local musicians—who also happen to be female—to pay tribute to the inimitable Billie Holiday, a woman whose voice lives on and continues to inspire. These ladies—including Catherine Feeny, Liz Vice, Danielle Sullivan-Ward, and others—operating in genres ranging from funk to folk, will perform their own renditions of Holiday's songs and subsequently illustrate her strong influence across the musical spectrum. It's bound to be a remarkable evening, and ticket sales will benefit the nonprofit's mission of supporting women artists. RAQUEL NASSER

CARLOS SOUFFRONT, DJ TRONIC, DJ TONY STEWART, MICAH McNELLY
(The Rose, 111 SW Ash) A seasoned music selector once pointed out that a great DJ has an intimate connection with their music, and knows how to put songs together in a way that makes them more than they'd be on their own. It takes years of attention and dedication to develop the wisdom needed to create and alter the moods of an entire room—it's what sets the newbies apart from the wizards. This applies to Carlos Souffront completely and he's got the props and experience to prove it. A celebrated alchemist of the dance-music scene from Detroit to San Francisco, he cultivates an atmosphere of magic-making where people can get really freaky. Unafraid to challenge dancefloors, he brings a refreshing perspective that pulls back the curtain to reveal hidden musical dimensions sure to shift your consciousness in the right direction. CHRISTINA BROUSSARD

PALABRA, ELFIN ELEPHANT, SUS QUARTET
(Habesha, 801 NE Broadway) When Palabra played a record-release show back in January 2012, they vowed it would be the only time they'd play. But the trio of Johan Wagner, Zachary Evans, and Papi Fimbres have since seen fit to make another record, and they've elected to play another show to go with it as well. The new Palabra joint is called Manos Luminosas y el Cubo Blanco ("Luminous hands and the white cube"), and it's a brief, jazzy, largely instrumental flight inward to the cerebral cortex, where sound takes on material characteristics. Tonight Palabra play the expected record release, but I wouldn't count on their shows being a regular thing. Meanwhile, Elfin Elephant is the free-jazz guise of AU's Luke Wyland and Dana Valatka. Tonight should be a memorable evening of fascinating improvised excursions, not likely to be repeated anytime soon. NL

SUNDAY 4/20

MOBB DEEP, BROTHERS FROM ANOTHER
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

DILLINGER ESCAPE PLAN, TRASH TALK, RETOX, SHINING
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) If the collective reputation of the Dillinger Escape Plan and Trash Talk's live sets are any indication, don't expect this gig to be contained by a mere stage. Whether it's Trash Talk's front/wildman Lee Spielman scaling monitors and diving without fear, or Dillinger's singer/screamer Greg Puciato breathing fire and literally walking on the heads of his fans, there's bound to be some sort of full-contact activity to go along with the hardcore ferocity of both bands. Show up early to check out Justin Pearson from the Locust's new project, a stripped-down sonic assault known as Retox. KEVIN DIERS

ST. PAUL AND THE BROKEN BONES, LIZ VICE
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Local gospel singer Liz Vice will command your attention—regardless of which fish decal you have plastered to your bumper, or how you feel when you watch Cosmos. With a voice that is at once omnipotent and intimate, set to lithe R&B and soul backdrops, Vice is causing a stir with her recent live performances, as well as her uplifting debut album, There's a Light, released by Portland's premier (only?) Christian record label, Deeper Well. Additionally, headliners St. Paul and the Broken Bones charm with their big, brassy soul, making for a night—originally scheduled at Mississippi Studios, but moved to the Wonder due to high demand—bound to light a dancing fire beneath your feet. RN

MONDAY 4/21

THE SHIVAS, SUPER 78, HONEY BUCKET
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) Portland garage-pop trio Honey Bucket recently followed up last year's self-titled cassette with the release of Futon, another Gnar Tape full of warm lo-fi gems to bob along to. "New Operation" and "Wizard Mountain, Pt. 2" get things off to a rough and rumbling start, providing some of the album's catchiest uptempo moments right off the bat. On the other end, "Jon Song" closes things out with the group's longest track to date, a reflective and meditative number that fully encapsulates the band's cozy, laidback vibe. With Honey Bucket working to establish the trend of naming your act after a porta potty, I continue to hold out hope for the electronic production duo of Willy Make It and the Wizard of Ooze to come forward. Have at it, beat heads; that's pure gold. CHIPP TERWILLIGER

PIOTR KUREK, THREADS, BRETT WITTMAN
(Valentine's, 232 SW Ankeny) Poland's Piotr Kurek combines impeccable and eerie melodic grace with a questing tone palette. His music seems geared for offbeat horror films and the academy, but it has an anything-can-happen sensibility that's rare in the latter place. Kurek's Heat album is a Rhodes-heavy compendium of deep, cosmic tone poetry that encompasses many moods. DAVE SEGAL

LUZ ELENA MENDOZA, PAT HULL, THE SMOKING FLOWERS, HARLOWE
(Secret Society, 116 NE Russell) For the past few years, Pat Hull has released a string of inspired albums. With wanderlust as his co-captain, Hull's "Harvest Moon"-like tenor has taken him from stints in Vermont, Chico, Brooklyn, and most recently Santa Cruz, all while touring and generating grassroots support for his prolific run of releases. His latest, Shed Skin, sends Hull's repetitive anti-folk songs to lush heights, allowing his rubber-band vocals room to roam. While in Portland, Hull will be finishing up his next album, a collection of live cuts from Yellow Room Studio that features Harlowe's Mark Robertson and Bob Reynolds. Nashville rock duo Smoking Flowers are along for the ride on this 10-day tour with Hull, towing an infectious trailer of dusty alt-country tunes. RJP

TUESDAY 4/22

ELLIE GOULDING, CONWAY
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) See My, What a Busy Week!

CIRCLE TAKES THE SQUARE, SLOTHS, THE SKY ABOVE AND EARTH BELOW
(Branx, 320 SE 2nd) See All-Ages Action!.

JUANA MOLINA, THERE IS NO MOUNTAIN
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Not one for spectacle or showmanship, Juana Molina instead concentrates her efforts on being a hypnotist of the highest order. Though commonly lumped with artists like Björk and CocoRosie, Molina's approach is decidedly understated in comparison. She works on creating intricate layers that slowly build and add textures, but rarely exhibit radical changes or lose their pulsing rhythm. Her most recent album, Eras, might not sound markedly different from her previous work, but it subtly shows off her band at their most technical and precise—which takes the entrancement of her soundscapes even further. In Latin America and Europe, Molina typically performs at large outdoor festivals. But her humble, stunning live show is better suited for small spaces; tonight's show at the Doug Fir is a perfect, rare opportunity to see her work her magic in an intimate setting. JJA

WHITE LIES, FRANKIE ROSE, TOGETHER PANGEA
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) When the Vivian Girls called it quits earlier this year, it was eye-opening to examine all of the side projects and offshoots that formed in the band's wake. The amount of acts could make for a Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon game based within the noise-pop world. Frankie Rose, the original drummer for Vivian Girls, proved to be a force of her own on the outstanding dream-pop debut Interstellar. There, Rose was able to distance herself from the lo-fi, jangle-pop background by layering her soaring, melodic voice and confessional songwriting with smooth, spacey synth-pop hooks. On the follow-up album, Herein Wild, fuzzy guitars and crashing drums make a brief return, pairing a bit of rawness with the glossy orchestral string sections found on tracks like "Sorrow." The collection of songs further establishes Rose's ability to wrap catchy music within atmospheric production with the best of them. CT