THE SHIVAS Sat 11/8 Bunk Bar

WEDNESDAY 11/5

SLOWDIVE, LOW
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

NATE WOOLEY, CAROL ROBINSON
(Revival Drum Shop, 2045 SE Ankeny) Composers Éliane Radigue and Denis Dufour are best known for their work with electronic instruments: The former's earliest efforts foreshadow the slowly expanding beauty of the ambient genre, and the latter used tape machines and other tools to manipulate the sounds of traditional classical ensembles. Both have extended their reach by writing for acoustic instruments, which is the focus of tonight's edition of the Creative Music Guild's Outset Series. CMG brings Nate Wooley and Carol Robinson to Revival Drum Shop for a performance of some of Radigue's expansive, drone-heavy pieces for clarinet and trumpet that were inspired by science fiction and the mathematical/philosophical principle known as Occam's razor, plus the premiere of a surely fascinating new work by Dufour written for the same instrumentation. ROBERT HAM

OK VANCOUVER OK, BLIND LOVEJOY, WHALES WHAILING
(Turn! Turn! Turn!, 8 NE Killingsworth) OK Vancouver OK don't hide what they like. On the British Columbia trio's latest album, they've written a series of songs that actively try to reflect the music that has influenced them the most. The album, appropriately titled Influences (out on Lost Sound Tapes), is made up of 10 infectious, locked-down grooves that seamlessly nod to '80s K Records, '90s Up Records, '70s no wave, generations of country-tinged freak folk, and beyond. But the album isn't just a chance for them to pay tribute. As the band's website states: "Influences hopes to influence others and build hope and momentum toward a radical shift in our collective cultures and daily lives." While this statement could signal an album of smug choir-preaching, the lyrics on Influences are anything but. Playful, simple, and relentlessly positive, OK Vancouver OK invite everyone into their idea of a better future. JOSHUA JAMES AMBERSON

NEW FOUND GLORY, WE ARE THE IN CROWD, FIREWORKS, BETTER OFF
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) Along with Blink-182, New Found Glory were the biggest players in perverting pop-punk at the turn of the millennium, transforming an exciting and even somewhat dangerous, typically politicized subgenre of punk into an inane, interminable series of bad jokes (see: every Warped Tour for the past 15 years). Unlike Blink, however, there's virtually nothing enduring about any of New Found Glory's material, not even their old, supposedly essential stuff. Every element of the band's music sounds confined to an epoch that was absolutely horrible for the state of rock 'n' roll, and anybody who tells you otherwise is either desperately trying to flaunt their "'90s baby" cred or has deeply questionable taste. The group's latest, the boldly titled Resurrection, sounds like a high-school band comprising 35-year olds, which is exactly what it is, although I guess second-wave pop-punk always embodied the concept of "never growing up." Too bad that's the mantra least compatible with the consistent production of good art. MORGAN TROPER

LOVE GIGANTIC
(LaurelThirst Public House, 2958 NE Glisan) I'm not sure I can make it through this preview without mentioning a specific UK/LA band that had a very famous album whose title rhymes with Tumours, but here goes: Love Gigantic is a Portland six-piece impressively skilled at vintage soft rock, and their debut album is impeccably crafted. Centered on lead singer Sarah King, the co-ed band smooths together acoustic and electric textures in appealing ways, with fancy guitarwork providing intrigue and the group's dense bank of harmonies spackling over any rough patches. The late-'70s FM pop-rock of "Lovin' Arms" is an effective time warp, and the slow waltz of "Woman in Love" is a power ballad with actual power, while "Songbird on a Wire" combines Leonard Cohen with Christine McVie of Fleetwo—whoops! Almost blew it. To celebrate the release of their self-titled debut album, Love Gigantic hosts a monthlong Wednesday happy-hour residency at the LaurelThirst. NED LANNAMANN

THURSDAY 11/6

FRANKIE ROSE, COLD BEAT, EPHRATA
(Branx, 1028 SE Water) See My, What a Busy Week!

THE WYTCHES, US LIGHTS, TALK IN TONGUES
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) The Wytches are one of those bands I was ready to dislike for a number of reasons, most notably because their reputation as a band-to-watch seemed to precede their release of music-to-hear, at least on this side of the Atlantic. Yes, another buzzy British band... we've all been burned before. But that, as they say in sports, is why you play the game; the musical equivalent is to actually listen. And the Wytches' debut album, Annabel Dream Reader, is an intriguing work, not only because of its influences (surf rock, psych, post-punk, Nirvana, the White Stripes) but because of its shadowy swagger and DIY urgency. Those elements feel maybe a bit too carefully sculpted here, but they're nonetheless positive qualities that may come more naturally as the Wytches mature. For now, though, hey—at least there's something behind the hype. BEN SALMON

FRIDAY 11/7

SIREN NATION: MELAO DE CUBA, LUZ ELENA MENDOZA, EDNA VAZQUEZ
(Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta) See My, What a Busy Week!

SIREN NATION: SWAN SOVEREIGN, CRUSHED OUT, FAULT LINES
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See My, What a Busy Week!

SIREN NATION: LIZ VICE, MY BROTHER AND I
(White Eagle, 836 N Russell) See My, What a Busy Week!

AND AND AND, PHONE CALL
(Parkway North at PSU's Smith Memorial Student Union, 1825 SW Broadway) See All-Ages Action!

DELTRON 3030, KID KOALA, TOPE
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Catching a glimpse of Deltron 3030 is rare, and for the lion's share of the last decade it would have been like spotting a cryptid. The futuristic alt-hiphop supergroup—Del the Funky Homosapien, Dan the Automator, and Kid Koala—blew minds in 2000 with their self-titled debut: an avant-garde rap record that catapulted listeners into the boots of a soldier in the year 3030. It wasn't just the concept that broke ground, but the wealth of minds that went into that record dropped any well-versed hiphop head's jaw: Prince Paul, Damon Albarn, Mr. Lif, among others. Rumors of a sequel began surfacing around 2004, but their sophomore album didn't become official until nine years after that. Now, more than a year after Event 2's release, it still feels like a far-fetched pipe dream to see Deltron 3030 in the flesh. But they are real and they are here. MATTHEW SCHONFELD

JD McPHERSON, THE CACTUS BLOSSOMS
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) JD McPherson's music looks backwards to a simpler time, but his retro style manages to be fresh and innovative. Hailing from suburban Oklahoma, McPherson creates a sound somewhere between 1954 and 2014. Though his rockabilly sound is familiar, it's hard not to be intrigued, or at the very least, start bobbing your head when you hear the first pulse of his clean guitar lines juxtaposed against the grit of his angsty voice. Minneapolis' Cactus Blossoms are based around brothers Jack Torrey and Page Burkum, and their lonesome, authentic country sound is bolstered by the brothers' exceptional Everly-style harmonies. ROSE FINN

DVS1
(Tonic Lounge, 3100 NE Sandy) A self-described beat and rhythm addict, DVS1 (Zak Khutoretsky) has been DJing, producing, and promoting dance-music events long enough to know the meaning of it. Known for flawless DJ sets full of endlessly awesome selections and hailed by dancers and listeners across the globe as something more than another passing trend, he's one of the most highly sought-after American DJs, performing abroad more often than in the US. DVS1's latest releases on his own imprint, Hush (not to be confused with Portland's Hush Records), give a fresh take on the old standby house and techno—with a hypnotic pull that calls the listener into a meditation on subtle variations of rhythm. It's refreshing to catch a selector who pushes the envelope toward diverse variations on excellence. CHRISTINA BROUSSARD

YEAR OF NO LIGHT, TAKE OVER AND DESTROY, EIGHT BELLS, BARROWLANDS
(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) Ausserwelt, the 2010 album from French heavies Year of No Light, is an epic piece of music in a time when that word has been stretched beyond recognition. It's the kind of record that'll knock Earth off its axis if you turn it up too loud. It's a titanic slab of slo-mo doom metal with post-rock melodic ambition, and it's a hell of a thing to try to follow up. But Year of No Light was up to the task last year, releasing not only Vampyr, a moody soundtrack to a 1932 horror film, but also Tocsin, which finds the band back at its primary job: building some of the most dynamic doom on the planet and demolishing everything in sight. They're joined by Arizona black 'n' rollers Take Over and Destroy, Portland prog-metal vets Eight Bells, and local dark-folk-metal band Barrowlands, who will be celebrating the physical release of their new album, Thane. BS

SATURDAY 11/8

QUEEN: DJ BEYONDA
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See My, What a Busy Week!

SIREN NATION: NATASHA KMETO, LEMOLO, THE CABIN PROJECT
(Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta) See My, What a Busy Week!

HISS GOLDEN MESSENGER, PHIL COOK
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Hiss Golden Messenger.

GENDERS, RUBY FRAY, BREAKUP FLOWERS
(The Foggy Notion, 3416 N Lombard) Read our article on Ruby Fray.

ALL YOUR FRIEND'S FRIENDS: CHICHARONES, XPERIENCE, IAME AND GOLDINI BAGWELL, KARL BLAU, & MORE
(Dante's, 350 W Burnside) K Records is one of the most iconic record labels in the Northwest, showcasing a vast array of our region's music scene since the early '80s. When the '90s explosion of DIY music hit the mainstream, the label found itself an international tastemaker with indie cred so deep that Kurt Cobain had the label's logo tattooed on his arm. Their latest release, All Your Friend's Friends, is a fierce foray into hiphop—an ambitious collection of more than 30 emcees hailing from Portland, Seattle, and Olympia. The album finds producer Smoke M2D6 of the Oldominion crew sampling the label's back catalog and deconstructing the sounds as a fresh canvas for emcees to paint their prose upon. Hopefully this is a harbinger of continued collaboration between independent musicians and local hiphop artists. RYAN FEIGH Also see My, What a Busy Week!

THE SHIVAS, JOLLAPIN JASPER, MOON BY YOU
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) While the Shivas have become known for playing some of the most maniacal surf-rock around, the band's fourth album, You Know What to Do, has a timely autumnal flair about it. Just take a glance at the album's orange-tinted jacket and the drawing of a sweater-clad arm clutching a copy of the LP, or, if you dare, look up the horror-themed music video for the rollicking title track and the scintillating follow-up, "Do the Crocodile," where the band's sunny beach vibes are transformed into straight-up nightmare fuel. If you've caught the group live recently, some of these songs have already sunk their hooks in deep. For the album, the band went the extra mile in the studio by partnering up with K Records founder Calvin Johnson to record everything to analog tape. The results speak for themselves, and the album further cements the Shivas as one of the best acts in town. CHIPP TERWILLIGER

INTRONAUT, ANCIIENTS, GRAVES AT SEA, WAYFARER, SIOUX
(Branx, 320 SE 2nd) After a new lineup, band member relocations. and probably more than a few punctured eardrums, doom metal overminds Graves at Sea have made 2014 their collective reintroduction year. Releasing the vinyl EP This Place Is Poison (via fellow crusters Rabbits' Eolian Empire imprint) en route to a spring European tour, followed by a split EP with Sourvein, the Portland foursome are turning up the gloom at just the right time of year. Their long-form, bleak sagas feature corrosive fits of anguished growls that border on the black metal side of the spectrum, and menacing tunes like "This Place Is Poison" sound as if they were cloned from the spliced DNA of both Sabbath and Mayhem. RYAN J. PRADO

ADRIAN BELEW POWER TRIO, SAUL ZONANA
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Like any versatile guitar slinger, Adrian Belew has a jaw-dropping resume. He got his start working with art-rock freak Frank Zappa, toured with David Bowie and Talking Heads during their heydays, and logged time as a member of King Crimson. Outside of the rare radio success of his 1989 single "Oh Daddy," Belew's solo efforts have received far less attention. More's the pity, because, although he often unnecessarily relies on technology—like the plug-in that makes his guitar sound like a piano—the thorny instrumentals he writes for his Power Trio put the emphasis on prog rock's jazz influence. Sure, it might be an excuse for him, bassist Julie Slick, and drummer Tobias Ralph to show off their respective chops, but when you're as talented as those three, you're forgiven a bit of flaunting. RH

SUNDAY 11/9

LOVE WITHOUT BORDERS: ANCIENT HEAT, LOST LANDER, BARNA HOWARD, AARON CHAPMAN, ADVENTURE GALLEY, SUBLIME FREQUENCIES DJs, DJ COOKY PARKER, DJ DULLAH, FUTRO MCs
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

BLONDE REDHEAD, HUNGRY GHOST
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) See My, What a Busy Week!

SHOVELS AND ROPE, WILLIE WATSON
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) Read our article on Shovels and Rope.

SLOTHS, DDY GLOBOX
(The Peculiarium, 2234 NW Thurman) See All-Ages Action!

THE LOWEST PAIR, THE MOONSHINE
(Al's Den, 303 SW 12th) The Americana-inspired musical explosion that's taken place over the last few years has left music fans with a lot of debris to work through. With so many bands playing in that bluegrass-infused style, it can get a little too kitschy for comfort. But when you find it done right, the sincerity is palpable, and the melodies are honest and enjoyable. The Lowest Pair, the duo of Kendl Winter and Palmer T. Lee, is strong in their simplicity—two whispering banjos making a bed for Lee and Winter's clear, modest harmonies. It's easy on the ear, the kind of thing you could hear night after night—and coincidentally they're at Al's Den for a weeklong residency. Mark it on your calendar a couple times. ROBIN BACIOR

MEMORY BOYS, HALF SHADOW, BLACK BELT EAGLE SCOUT
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) Half Shadow's shows are not really shows, but transcendent curiosities. The project, an ever-evolving songwriting extension of Portland's Jesse Carsten, is built out of a series of weighted dreamsongs. Rarely performed the same way twice, these songs are filled with detours to unexpected lands where the line between open and unhinged is thin. Carsten's performances are invariably powerful, full of wonder, and unlike anything else. Tonight's show is the homecoming for Half Shadow's joint "Dream of Desertification" tour with local folk-pop favorites Memory Boys, for which Carsten plays drums. Black Belt Eagle Scout, the excellent solo project of Katherine Paul from Genders, opens the night. JJA

ITASCA, DESERT OF HIATUS, DJ FELISHA
(Valentine's, 232 SW Ankeny) As someone pretty much immediately turned off by anything described as "folksy," I was apprehensive listening to Unmoored by the Wind, the new record from Itasca—the moniker for New York-via-LA singer/songwriter Kayla Cohen. I'm not even sure if I would categorize Itasca as folk, though; the musical breadth of songs like the gorgeous "After Dawn" and Cohen's hyper-technical, borderline neoclassical guitar playing defy the appropriateness of such a simplistic designation (although Cohen's voice and phrasing are somewhat reminiscent of Wildflowers-era Judy Collins). Unmoored by the Wind is of its own breed, an acoustic-based record that sounds expansive in spite of its subdued nature. It doesn't employ any of the artifice typical of contemporary folk—it's simply a great record by an immensely promising songwriter. MT

NILS FRAHM, DAWN OF MIDI
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) When Berlin-based pianist Nils Frahm plays Mississippi Studios tonight, it will be his third visit to the venue in 14 months. If you missed him the first two times, don't make that mistake again. In a growing field of artists who are blanketing piano music with modern electronic sounds, Frahm may be the most easily accessible, thanks to his sharp ear for melody and the power of repetition. His 2013 album Spaces is a stunner; recorded using different methods in a variety of locations with different audiences, it showcases not only Frahm's songs, but also his improvisational skill and command of dynamics. Start with the song "Says" and see if your heart doesn't burst six or seven minutes in. As if Frahm isn't enough of a draw, Sunday's show will feature opener Dawn of Midi, an incredible New York trio that creates hypnotic, minimalist dance-music grooves using bass, piano, and drums. BS

MONDAY 11/10

ATRIARCH, USNEA, MUSCLE AND MARROW
(Tonic Lounge, 3100 NE Sandy) See My, What a Busy Week!, and read our article on Atriarch.

THE LOWEST PAIR, GABE BARNETT FROM MINNEAPOLIS
(Al's Den, 303 SW 12th) See Sunday's listing.

TUESDAY 11/11

HERB ALPERT, LANI HALL
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) See My, What a Busy Week!

THE LOWEST PAIR, LYNNE PIPER
(Al's Den, 303 SW 12th) See Sunday's listing.

JULIAN CASABLANCAS AND THE VOIDZ, CONNAN MOCKASIN
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) I guess if you go in with zero expectations, you're bound to be surprised. Julian Casablancas trades in the Strokes for the Voidz (a nod to Richard Hell?) on his latest record, Tyranny, which is less slaphappy garage-rock fun, and more Escape from New York dystopian noise. Most of it is pretty captivating, although maybe a little overwrought. But I like where Casablancas' head is at. With the Strokes having reached some sort of modern classic status among people of a certain age, it would have been easy to crank out another pop record. Instead, we get uneasy listening. And it'll be interesting to see how it translates live—it'd better make me feel like the world is ending. MARK LORE

FUTURE HISTORIANS, THE WEATHER MACHINE
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Future Historians are already on album number three, so if the just-released Portrait of Self is your introduction to the Portland band, it's time to catch up. Their new one is a concise, melody-packed, 100-percent-amiable collection of folky, well-written tunes from bandleader Dave Shur. Flecks of acoustic guitar, mandolin, and piano find their way into most tunes, which betray darker subject matter than their sunny exteriors suggest. "Bus" and "County Fair" showcase the cracking, crashing rock side of the band, while "Friends" and "Sometimes" are simple, patient songs that deal with love and friendship without turning corny—not an easy thing to do. Portrait of Self's nine songs trot by quickly enough that you'll find yourself hitting repeat on Future Historians' immensely likeable new recording. NL

WATER LIARS, BED
(Branx, 1028 SE Water) The barbed folk-rock constructed by Oxford, Mississippi's Water Liars is the product of guitarist/singer Justin Kinkel-Schuster's songwriting and the arrangements that arise out of his collaboration with drummer Andrew Bryant. After turning a batch of spur-of-the-moment recordings into the band's 2012 debut, Phantom Limb, Water Liars hit the ground running, releasing the follow-up album Wyoming a year later, and a self-titled third album earlier this year, which saw the duo expand to a trio with the addition of bassist GR Robinson. These rapid-fire offerings work well for Water Liars. The music rides on the strength of Kinkel-Schuster's earnest and evocative vocals, and the accompanying instrumentation on the songs match that rawness and never come across as over-cooked. That said, there is plenty of variation found on Water Liars, and this combination of bursting rock energy and desolate ballads makes the band well worth checking out. CT

LAGWAGON, SWINGIN' UTTERS, THIS LEGEND
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) It's been nine years since skate-punk legends Lagwagon released Resolve, a mostly aimless collection of tunes caught somewhere between the band's past and future. Geared up from a long studio hiatus, Lagwagon's brand-new LP, Hang, begins with the breakneck, Fat Wreck-vibed "Reign." Pretty quickly, though, the album's touted conceptual elements—concerning humanity, the environment, and the consequences of turning a blind eye to global warming—transform the album into a heady, metal-tinged dissertation from a group who's been through lots of trends and stayed more or less true to doing whatever they want. Songs like "Made of Broken Hearts" and "The Cog in the Machine" are scorchers that loyalists to Trashed-era Lagwagon will find especially satisfying, with huge riffs, half-tempo breakdowns, and Joey Cape's return to ass-rockian vocal calisthenics. In short, this album is a wink and a nod to how great this band is, not how cool they used to be. RJP