Up & Coming 

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THURSDAY 6/11

MUSIC IN THE SCHOOL BENEFIT: STARFUCKER, LIFESAVAS, STARPARTY, DON'T HURT MILES

(Cleveland High School, 3400 SE 26th) See My, What a Busy Week!, and Our Town Could be Your Life.

BAT FOR LASHES, HECUBA

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See Music.

MARSHALL CRENSHAW, MATT SHEEHY

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) From playing Buddy Holly in 1987's La Bamba to penning that most perfect of pop songs in 1982's "Someday, Someway," Marshall Crenshaw has been an ever-present fixture on the outskirts of mainstream music for close to three decades now. Recently, he's donated his songs chiefly to movie soundtracks, but six years after his last full-length, Crenshaw has unleashed Jaggedland, yet another collection of accomplished singer/songwriter fare. It's very good, with consummate musicianship and sharp-witted songs that'll play great on NPR, and you can probably live without it. Opening the show is one of Portland's best troubadours, Matt Sheehy, whose debut solo album Tigerphobia is one of those records you should absolutely not live without. We've said many nice things about Sheehy before in these pages; every single one of them is true. NED LANNAMANN

TELEPATHE, NITE JEWEL, FLESHTONE, LINGER & QUIET

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) The finest moments—and there are many—from Telepathe's just-released Dance Mother come with the knowledge that everything this Brooklyn duo creates is fresh. Never relying on the crutch of '80s electro-pop, Melissa Livaudais and Busy Gangnes expand heavily on the electro template by slathering it with waves of howling synths, hypnotic loops, and the best femme vocal interplay since Le Tigre asked "What's Yr Take on Cassavetes?" Feel free to credit producer Dave Sitek (of TV on the Radio), or their pals who contributed to Dance Mother (TVOTR's Kyp Malone and Shannon Funchess from !!!), but the real praise should be for the ladies of Telepathe, who just might have dropped the best dance-pop recording of 2009. EZRA ACE CARAEFF

PORTLAND HEARING VOICES BENEFIT: THE REED SEA, RECLINERLAND, GAVIN CASTLETON

(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) Portland Hearing Voices is one of the first organizations of its kind in the United States, part of a cutting-edge movement that re-addresses what it means to hear voices and otherwise have "non-ordinary sensory experiences." Proposing alternative ways of defining what in many cases would receive a knee-jerk diagnosis and medication under the traditional mental health system, PHV also aims to educate the general population in a culture where mental health problems are closely associated with fear and violence (see: every horror film villain, ever). Tonight's the night to learn more about the fledgling organization, throw them some support, and catch some local music in the meantime. MARJORIE SKINNER

PURE COUNTRY GOLD , OLD GROWTH, ORGANIZED SPORTS, THE MAN HOLES

(Roscoe's, 8105 SE Stark) Montavilla dive bar Roscoe's has pretty much everything you need to make it your home away from home: cheap eats, stiff drinks, a good juke, and the occasional rock show. Now you can add sushi to the list—the folks at Roscoe's have opened a sushi joint next door, and soon enough you'll be able to order all the raw fish you want from inside the bar. Wash down that California roll with a few cheap beers and the ragged glory of Old Growth, who make the familiar combo of guitar-bass-drums sound as good as ever. You've also got the disorganized unsportsmanlike conduct of Organized Sports, whose disjointed hardcore might make you as queasy as an iffy piece of raw tuna. It's all in good fun, though, and like a big dose of wasabi, it'll clear your head out. NL

FRIDAY 6/12

GREY ANNE, SALLIE FORD & THE SOUND OUTSIDE, PETOSKEY, DUO'VER

(Junior Ambassador's, 4734 N Albina) See My, What a Busy Week!

PORTLAND CELLO PROJECT

(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Few things could topple the beauty of Thao Nguyen's voice on her We Brave Bee Stings and All recording. That is, until you hear the Bay Area vocalist belting out her songs while backed by the mighty Portland Cello Project. Long associated with stripping the sacred—if not stodgy—instrument of its unyielding reputation, PCP is best known for balancing classical cello arrangements with crossover pop covers. But with their Kill Rock Stars debut, The Thao and Justin Power Sessions, PCP establishes itself as the finest collaborative band around. Their rich and detailed compositions bend and swell with the vocals of local newcomer Power and the enigmatic Nguyen. Like Booker T. and the MGs were to Stax, PCP now seems to be the (stringed) house band for the Kill Rock Stars set. EAC Also see My, What a Busy Week!, pg. 17.

GRATITILLIUM, FINN RIGGINS, MARMITS

(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) Apparently, Nick Caceres really likes animals. He's the safari guide behind Gratitillium, and he's assembled an album where every song is about a different critter. Gratitillium, Volume 1 includes tracks like "Monkey Play," "Frog King," and "Spider Bark," and it's playful, pastoral folk crafted from varispeed vocals, odd tropical sounds, and a brightly strummed acoustic guitar. Some of the home-cooked songs degenerate into incoherent lo-fi freakouts, but the bulk of Volume 1 is really fun stuff, equal parts Portland cutesiness and Tropicalia-influenced spirit questing. The album's release is celebrated tonight with a show that promises to include "costumes, animal channeling sessions, face painting, and pogo-inducing sing-alongs," just so you know what you're in for. NL

REBECCA GATES & THE CONSORTIUM, ADAM STEPHENS & THE FINITE PLAIN, SEAN FLINN

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Tell me when to stop: Elliott Smith, Beck, the Minus 5, the Decemberists... with a list of such heavy-hitting collaborators, it's safe to assume that Rebecca Gates has friends far more famous than you or I do. But the true legacy of Gates lies not with the contents of her Rolodex, but with the Spinanes, her endlessly endearing '90s alt-pop duo whose music has aged as gracefully as Gates' solo work. Tonight, she'll be backed by another Rebecca (Cole, of the Minders), Ji Tanzer (of the Blue Cranes), and Dave Depper (Loch Lomond). According to an email from Gates, she promises to perform some older Spinanes numbers as well. EAC

A CAMP, GENTLEMAN REG

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) A Camp is the solo project of (Swedish and typically, ridiculously elfin-looking) singer Nina Persson of the Cardigans. On A Camp's most recent album, Colonia, Persson deploys her capable, ranging voice in service of big, brightly orchestrated, vaguely country-western pop songs. Nothing here is quite as insanely ear-worming as the Cardigans' biggest stateside hits, but maybe that's for the best anyway. A Camp have a forthcoming EP, Covers, on which the band tackles the likes of Pink Floyd, David Bowie, and Grace Jones (recall the Cardigans' silly, sweetly loungey cover of Black Sabbath's "Iron Man" and know that Persson is well up to the task). ERIC GRANDY

SATURDAY 6/13

OREGON WORD JAM: TIM SPROUL, WILLY VLAUTIN, PAUL BRAINARD, MATT LOVE, MICHAEL DEAN DAMRON, LEWI LONGMIRE BAND

(Kelly's Olympian, 426 SW Washington) See My, What a Busy Week!

SHELLAC, ARC WELDER

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) See Music.

SAPIENT, SANDPEOPLE, CANCER RISING, BRAILLE, ONLY ONE, ILLMACULATE, ATLAS, GEPETTO

(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) See Music.

CONSTANTINES, CRYSTAL ANTLERS, I WAS A KING

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) "I believe that the life of a rock 'n' roll band will last as long as you look down into the audience and can see yourself, and your audience looks up at you and see themselves." While that quote is courtesy of the sage wisdom of Bruce Springsteen, its meaning transcends the bright lights of arena rock fame and can be directly applied to the blue collar rockers of Constantines. The Toronto band has been leaving it all on the stage (their '08 SXSW performance featured one band member in a cast, and another who literally rocked himself out of the shoes he was wearing) for close to a decade now with a jittery and impassioned amalgam of the rigid post-punk of Fugazi and the workman soul of the aforementioned Boss. Their latest, Too Slow for Love, might appear as a mix-and-match gathering of B-side scraps, but this digital EP is a swollen treasure chest of stripped-down alternative takes (the bare-bones version of "I Will Not Sing a Hateful Song" is emotionally crippling in its sheer beauty). They might not be as well known as their respected influences, but few bands can peer into the crowd and witness a fanbase as devoted and loyal as those of us who see themselves in Constantines. EAC

OZ FEST: FINN RIGGINS, MASSIVE MOTH, PAPER BRAIN, JARED MEES AND THE GROWN CHILDREN, PEP ASSEMBLY, SKIP ROXY, YEAH GREAT FINE

(Oz Café;, 1720 NW Lovejoy) You might know Oz Café as the little caffeine and cuteness nook located near Tender Loving Empire. They're the folks behind Oz Fest (it has nothing to do with Ozzfest, so please don't sue them, Sharon Osbourne), which features a bevy of local music and vendors donating their time for a good cause (Providence's Cancer Wing and Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation, respectively). The lineup is stellar, but whatever you do, don't miss out on the dreamy pop of Paper Brain. They might make pop music sound effortless, but don't let that fool you; there are intricate layers of co-ed harmonies, warm production, and energetic arrangements throughout their recently released debut recording, Ain't Nobody Cares. Ignore the double negatives and pay attention to this band. EAC

THE LEMONHEADS, TEA FOR JULIE

(Mission Theater, 1624 NW Glisan) It's a shame about Evan. The legacy of the Lemonheads never really made it out of the '90s, and as a solo artist Evan Dando has received little recognition (although I might be the world's only fan of 2003's Baby I'm Bored) beyond the singer's well-documented battles with sobriety and his recent legal actions against General Motors for scoring a commercial with a song that sounds suspiciously close to 1992's "It's a Shame About Ray." Now back into the Lemonheads' fold, the band is touring in support of the dismal covers record, Varshons. Did the world really need an album of Dando & Co. covering GG Allin, Christina Aguilera, and Leonard Cohen? Oh, and just in case you are still pondering that question, Liv Tyler sings on the Cohen cover. EAC

SUNDAY 6/14

SHELLAC, ARC WELDER

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) See Music.

THE CHURCH, ADAM FRANKLIN, BOLTS OF MELODY

(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) The Church and Adam Franklin (of Swervedriver fame, and also kicking it with Interpol drummer Sam Fogarino in Magnetic Morning) prove that rockers can "mature" with dignity while not blanding the fuck out. Australia's the Church have been honing their lustrous psych pop for 29 years, scoring a couple of hits along the way, but most during this long span—like a more palatable Legendary Pink Dots—just unassumingly churning out moody, baroque, artful songs for a diehard cult following. In Swervedriver, Franklin wrote a slew of classic power-shoegaze anthems; his solo work hasn't attained those heights, but recent albums like Spent Bullets and Bolts of Melody tap into a more subdued, equally beautiful strain of epic rock. His somewhat complicated tunesmithery paradoxically connects with a disarming emotional directness (see particularly the gradually swelling ballad "It Hurts to See You Go"). DAVE SEGAL

MONDAY 6/15

AU REVOIR SIMONE, FINDLAY BROWN, LEAVING THE SCENE

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) See My, What a Busy Week!

TUESDAY 6/16

BEN KWELLER, JONES STREET STATION

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

THE GERMS, POISON IDEA, KRUM BUMS, SILENT MAJORITY

(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE 39th) Punk died in 1980, when Germs vocalist Darby Crash committed suicide in Los Angeles four days after his band played its supposedly final show. Punk died again in 2006, when Poison Idea guitarist Tom "Pig Champion" Roberts passed away at home in Portland after battling a debilitating kidney infection. If these artifacts of West Coast proto-hardcore can perform, now, without their most iconic men, then punk is not dead. Sick, maybe, in the case of the Germs, which reformed during the production of dreadful biopic What We Do Is Secret, choosing the actor who plays Crash (Shane West) as its new chancellor. Poison Idea is still a healthy threat. While opening for Amebix last month at Hawthorne Theatre, the group nearly burned the place down—literally. After spitting half a bottle of water onto a stage diver, vocalist Jerry A. took aim at the crowd with a mouthful of flammable liquid. Someone handed him a torch, and he ended the set with a spectacular fireball, igniting (only) visions of Great White in our heads. We survived. MIKE MEYER

WEDNESDAY 6/17

PJ HARVEY & JOHN PARISH, POP PARKER

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) See Music.

FEMI KUTI & THE POSITIVE FORCE

(Oregon Zoo, 4001 SW Canyon) Fela Anikulapo Kuti, the most brilliant African musician of the 20th century, didn't make music so much as he did a society of music—and a beat dynasty, in the process. His son Femi was educated in this society. He toured with his father and learned to play the saxophone and sing protest songs. When it comes to musicianship, Femi is better than his father; however, when it comes to composition and songwriting, Fela is better than his son. Femi's 12-year-old son is now receiving an education through the musical society his grandfather built. The boy is learning how to play a mean saxophone. One day he will become the king of the realm of the Afrobeat. CHARLES MUDEDE Also see My, What a Busy Week!

JULIE DOIRON, AVI BUFFALO

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Since picking up the guitar to join rock group Eric's Trip at age 18, Julie Doiron has mastered the art of unassuming pop music. Now with nine albums' worth to her name, Doiron's simple, elegant, and playful songwriting style is reminiscent of Northwest darling Mirah, but those French-Canadian roots give her just enough of an exotic tinge to make her fuzzy guitars and feathery voice sound a bit otherworldly. With such a longstanding presence in indie rock, it's no wonder that Julie collaborates effortlessly with other musicians, like Herman Dune (2007's Not on Top has her on bass and backing vocals for the French anti-folkers) and Mount Eerie (2008's Lost Wisdom). Still, it's her solo work—such as this year's I Can Wonder What You Did with Your Day—that shines the brightest, transforming the typical experiences of a regular life into precious and exalted psalms of her era. MARANDA BISH

JAY REATARD, THEE OH SEES, THE NICE BOYS

(Dante's, 1 SW 3rd) In a few short years, Jay Reatard has already amassed a bafflingly huge discography, with solo releases—including six singles that came out on Matador last year—as well as records from his old bands the Reatards and the Lost Sounds. On all of these releases, Reatard's love of the pop single is undeniable, even as his equally fervent love for brash noisiness is what initially grabs the ear. It's a quality he shares with San Francisco's Thee Oh Sees, one of the finest garage bands currently operating. The Oh Sees' latest album, Help—released a couple months ago by In the Red Records—is a loud, sloppy dance party where the punch has been spiked with something truly sinister. The twin vocals of John Dwyer and Brigid Dawson sound like Sonny and Cher after a long paint-huffing session, and I think one song even has a flute. In other words, it's as much weird fun as you could ask for, a bruising, '60s-flavored piece of trash-punk with a few curveballs. NL

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