Up & Coming 

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THURSDAY 6/18

PLANNED PARENTHOOD BENEFIT: DJ ANJALI, TAH REI , DJ GLOBALRUCKUS, THE GOOD TIME GIRLS

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Dance the pants off your clean and healthy nether regions at Planned Parenthood's Pink Party—all proceeds from tonight go to benefit the Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon. SARAH MIRK

ROCK 'N' ROLL CAMP FOR GIRLS BENEFIT: FEELIN' ALRIGHT, DIRTY MITTENS , ANATURALE, DJ STS

(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) See My, What a Busy Week!

THE BUILDERS AND THE BUTCHERS, LOCH LOMOND , AH HOLLY FAM'LY

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) See Music.

GENE WEEN, CLAUDE COLEMAN JR.

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Ween have been maddeningly inconsistent over two-plus decades of making stoners snort beer through their nostrils via the absurd power of their music. Their large catalog is awash with both sublimely beautiful art rock (see especially The Mollusk) and banal, misguided goofs and spoofs of nearly every genre under the moon. Guitarist/vocalist Gene Ween is a gifted player with an idiosyncratic voice that spans many timbres and styles. So it's a shame he sometimes adopts Frank Zappa's most juvenile tendencies to provoke cheap laughs in his own work, because when Gene's in serious mode, he can move you as deeply as late Funkadelic ax hero Eddie Hazel or twisted psych-pop mavericks like Syd Barrett and Skip Spence. DAVE SEGAL

THE FIX: DIAMOND D, OHMEGA WATTS, REV. SHINES, DJ KEZ, DJ DUN DIGGY

(Someday Lounge, 125 NW 5th) Diamond D is in that class of hiphop producers and rappers who are not exceptional but are far from wack. Diamond D has always made high-grade hiphop. He won't transport you to other worlds, but he will not let you or the art down. D's first hit, "I'm Not Playing," which was released over 20 years ago, made the idea of hiphop professionalism a reality. The track was not groundbreaking, in a period of constant groundbreaking (De La Soul, Public Enemy, Slick Rick, etc.), but tight (a modulated blues lick) and hardcore (a muscular bass line). Diamond D also made the classic "Sally Got a One-Track Mind," and, in the '90s, formed the legendary D.I.T.C. Also, in my opinion, D provided the freshest track on Soundbombing 2, "When it Pours it Rains," (I think 50 Cent bit his whole style from that recording). Diamond D's history is as long as it is impressive. CHARLES MUDEDE

ISIS, HELMS ALEE, MAMIFFER

(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE 39th) Isis are stars in the burgeoning metalgaze movement, in which beauty and beastliness jostle for supremacy in your headspace, often resulting in a bloody draw—but wow, look at the pretty spatters all that plasma makes. On Isis' latest disc, the aptly titled Wavering Radiant, Aaron Turner and Michael Gallagher's alternately spangly and rumbling guitar tones swell above Turner's tormented and wistful vocals—all of which coalesce into grandiose arrangements that reveal some members may have enrolled in a serious composition course at university. It wouldn't be crazy to note Neurosis' artfully heavy influence here. Openers Mamiffer, a Seattle unit led by Faith Coloccia, create a brooding, droning strain of chamber rock that's heavy in a non-obvious manner. DS

FRIDAY 6/19

THE B-52S, THE 88

(Oregon Zoo, 4001 SW Canyon) See My, What a Busy Week!

THE FRESH & ONLYS, IDLE TIMES, THE WHINES

(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) Oh, where to begin with the Fresh and Onlys' "Peacock and Wing"? It's so unbelievably, motherfuckingly good, the kind of perfect pop song that makes you stop whatever dumb thing you're doing and leap out of your seat. With a lickety-split trash beat and a guitar riff as insistent as a woodpecker banging its head against a tree, it's packed airtight with guitar fuzz, whistling amplifier hiss, indeterminate percussion noises, and a male/female vocal that goes from calm to holler in seconds flat. The rest of the San Francisco band's self-titled debut isn't quite as good—how could it possibly be?—but it's damn close. "Endless Love" is intricately baroque, while "Feelings in My Heart" sounds like something the Beatles covered back in the Hamburg days. The Fresh and Onlys play a headlining set at Slabtown on Friday, but they come back through Portland days later, acting as backing band to long-lost '70s psychedelic singer/songwriter Rodriguez at the Doug Fir. NED LANNAMANN

PAPERCUTS, PORT O'BRIEN

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Papercuts is the quietly commanding indie-pop project of prolific San Francisco-based musician Jason Robert Quever. Quever has recorded with Vetiver, Cass McCombs, and Casiotone for the Painfully Alone, and has toured with Grizzly Bear. These associations give some idea of Quever's style—gentle, pacifically paced, often acoustic, and inhabiting intimately small spaces overlooking wide-open fields of echo and reverb. His latest, You Can Have What You Want, is one of those undemanding albums that imperceptibly worm their way from pleasant background music to persistently haunting before you know it. Port O'Brien sing sad, lonely, sometimes satisfied songs about life on the sea, working a fishing boat, which is how singer Van Pierszalowski has spent many a summer. ERIC GRANDY

THE NIGHT, LEGEND OF DUTCH SAVAGE, MINOTON , FEMALES

(Tonic Lounge, 3100 NE Sandy) While tonight's show is set to celebrate the release of the Night's new EP, Look to the Sky, it also marks the Portland rockers' last show ever. But don't expect a morose goodbye—the Night plays hoarse, riffy, glam-edged hard rock that's meant to be dirty fun, equal parts '70s butt-metal and '90s tattoo-rock. And all good things come in pairs, right? Birds of a feather Legend of Dutch Savage are also on the bill, celebrating the release of their long-in-the-works self-titled record, also a glammy, stone-riffed, butt-boogie hard rock record, and... what the crap? Legend of Dutch Savage are calling it quits, too? Following tonight's record release, they play one last show in Longview, Washington, and that's it. Talk about a bunch of teases—both bands give us a taste of the goods, then yank our chain by cutting us off forever. I hope this is not a trend. NL

SATURDAY 6/20

VIVA VOCE, CUT OFF YOUR HANDS, AGES

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) See My, What a Busy Week!, and Music.

YOUNG FRESH FELLOWS, THE TRIPWIRES, FROM WORDS TO BLOWS

(Dante's, 1 SW 3rd) Sweet Jesus, has it really been a quarter century since the release of Fabulous Sounds of the Pacific Northwest? The Young Fresh Fellows first pried open their bag of tricks—the pep of punk rock, the politeness of indie rock, the wry lyrics of a rogue English major—in the early '80s, and have recently returned with I Think This Is, their first album since 2001. Produced by Robyn Hitchcock, the album continues forth with the Fellows' beguilingly loose rock 'n' roll appeal: a steady diet of youthful indiscretion, alongside the wisdom that (should) accompany age. Scott McCaughey & Co. were never the type to bellow about the predictable pains of growing older—or embark on a cringe-worthy midlife artistic crisis—and with I Think This Is they demonstrate that there is still plenty of room to grow old within rock music. EZRA ACE CARAEFF

SUNDAY 6/21

BARK HIDE & HORN, DUSTY RHODES & THE RIVER BAND, BIRDS & BATTERIES

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

BLADEN COUNTY SUMMER SOLSTICE PARTY: SEAN FLINN, ALAN SINGLEY, THE MINT CHICKS, & MORE

(Rontoms, 600 E Burnside) The summer solstice is the longest day of the year, and at this latitude the sun doesn't dip behind the horizon till nearly 10 pm. So it's a time to be spent out of doors, among friends, as the sun gradually sinks—perhaps with food, definitely with drink, against a backdrop of music and merrymaking. What a stroke of luck, then, that local label Bladen County Records is hosting a summer solstice party and barbecue that features acts from their deep and diverse roster. Troubadour Sean Flinn is the fellow on the bill you may not have heard of; he's Jolie Holland's guitar player and his music is as honest and forthright as it comes—literate, sober tunesmithing commanded by a strong and assured voice. There's not a lull in this lineup, but Flinn will be a decided highlight in this series of local musicians celebrating midsummer's eve. NL

THE QUIET ONES, MARTY MARQUIS

(The Artistery, 4315 SE Division) The Quiet Ones are my sleeper hit of the summer. They released Better Walk Than Ride Like That last year, and I remember thinking at the time that it was a fine record with obvious nods to Wilco. But "fine" doesn't usually stick, and away they went into the "soon to be forgotten" pile. But after being reintroduced to them weeks ago, on a hot, sunny afternoon, everything clicked into place—their bright Beatles-esque harmonies, their fun guitar riffs, their playful drumming—their songs are delightful and imperfect packages of pop and I want to spend the rest of the summer doing nothing but going on picnics while listening to them. MEGAN SELING

MONDAY 6/22

THE PRESENT & QUEENS, ETERNAL TAPESTRY

(East End, 203 SE Grand) Brooklyn-based producer/musician Rusty Santos has earned low-key kudos as a behind-the-boards savant for Animal Collective, Panda Bear, and White Magic. As excellent as those artists are, they don't quite delve into the real weirdness like Santos does in his current trio, the Present & Queens. The group's debut full-length, World I See, explodes traditional song form into a miasmic mosaic of tones and textures, resulting in a bizarre new form of ambient unrock that makes Black Dice's beatless passages sound new age-y (and I'm the Dice's number-one fan). On first listen, the new The Way We Are is another surreptitious reality-eraser on the lofty level of Biota, Vas Deferens Organization, and early Deuter. This record will fuck your mind so it stays fucked for a long time. DS

ZAIMPH & TENSES, ILYAS AHMED, SKIRTFLANK & PIZZLE, GOLDEN RETRIEVER

(Valentine's, 232 SW Ankeny) It would seem that, as of a few years ago, few local performers had the allure and sparkling future of one Ilyas Ahmed. His whispered and droning folk songs shared the haunting quality of the late Nick Drake, but sans the soft Anglo vulnerability and matching scarf ensemble. Instead, Ahmed is less a confessionary singer/songwriter and more an offshoot of the noise community, a not-too-unfamiliar path considering the meteoric rise of his pal, Liz Harris of Grouper. Ahmed's latest, Goner, trudges through a stark and murky landscape of dirty guitar hooks, hypnotic patterns, and vocals delivered in an ethereal haze. The aforementioned Harris makes an appearance on the album's closing number, "Exit Twilight," a lovely—if not absolutely desolate—song that will stay with you long after Goner has ceased spinning. EAC

TUESDAY 6/23

DAVID BYRNE

(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) See My, What a Busy Week!

US AIR GUITAR CHAMPIONSHIPS: STAY TUNED

(Dante's, 1 SW 3rd) See My, What a Busy Week!

WHITE RABBITS, THE SUBJECTS

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) New York's White Rabbits are a six-piece rock band who combine worn, whiskey-scented singing with disorientingly busy percussion that, on their latest album, It's Frightening (produced by Britt Daniel), wanders all over the stereo field. White Rabbits have two singers and two drummers, so it makes sense that they impress on those fronts, but that's not all that's going on; there's also looming, low-octave piano tones, rumbling bass, and loose, electrified guitars. Gripping enough in the moment, the songs seem like they should be catchier after the fact, but instead it's like trying to recall details from a blurry but pleasant night out. Their highly charged live show, on the other hand, looks totally memorable (they're also playing an all-ages show at Music Millennium in the afternoon). EG

DEASTRO, LOGAN LYNN , WAMPIRE

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Deastro (22-year-old Randolph Chabot) is Ghostly International's entrant in the Animal Collective emulation sweepstakes. It's probably not as calculated as all that, but there's no denying that Deastro's ebullient, slightly quirky pop—it's not so much leftfield as it is shallow center—resembles bits of Merriweather Post Pavilion. Tastefully bathed in reverb, Chabot's voice assumes an angelic cleanliness amid equally pristine textures that recall Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark's subtly glowing productions. A cover of Steve Reich's "Different Trains" speaks of Deastro's good taste and ability to bolster minimalist composition with thick dollops of electronic sweetness. And "Vermillion Plaza" thrillingly takes urgent Giorgio Moroder dance tropes to the underage concert circuit. DS

WEDNESDAY 6/24

FRANKIE-PALOOZA: SPINDRIFT, NICE BOYS, KLEVELAND, THEE LOYAL BASTARDS, POWER OF COUNTY, LSD&D, THE WEAKLINGS, GODS AND KINGS, RED HOT PISTOL, GUNFIGHTER, MIC CRENSHAW

(Dante's, 1 SW 3rd) See My, What a Busy Week!

THE HUNCHES, EAT SKULL, THE BLIMP, THE WHINES

(East End, 203 SE Grand) See Music.

HERE WE GO MAGIC, THROW ME THE STATUE, MILES BENJAMIN ANTHONY ROBINSON

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Well, golly, this is going to be one swell evening. Here We Go Magic is the handiwork of Brooklynite Luke Temple, who committed a series of gently ambient jams to tape for Here We Go Magic's self-titled album. It's a parade of gorgeous backdrops, grainy and lo-fi, yet somehow as sumptuous as a Tangerine Dream soundtrack. But that's not all Temple did—he also wrote some sparkling pop tunes to fit inside these soundscapes, and it's a killer combo. Temple has fleshed out his project with some hired hands for the live show—as has Scott Reitherman, who recorded Throw Me the Statue's fantastic Moonbeams album largely by his lonesome. Throw Me the Statue traffics in fluffy air-popped kernels, with blippy shards of melody tucked inside squirming beats that are equal parts bit-synth dance and galloping Northwest indie rock. NL

CURSIVE, MT. ST. HELENS VIETNAM BAND, BOX ELDERS

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Despite a career that has featured both house shows and tour buses, simple trajectory states that after so many years, so many records, and so many collapsed lungs (frontman Tim Kasher once had a lung quit mid-tour), Cursive would be on their homestretch by now. No longer the bastions of Midwest emo, the band has the awkward distinction of being men in a world of boys. Yet for album number seven, the oddly titled Mama, I'm Swollen, Cursive seems to be bigger than ever, with appearances on Letterman, universal praise for the recording, and a newfound sense of importance. Credit Kasher's ability to shake free the youthful histrionics of his past—remember, his spectacular divorce concept record, Domestica, was spawned from his short stay as a Portlander in the late '90s—and nicely segue into the looming panic of growing old, and our inevitable dance with mortality. EAC

RODRIGUEZ, THE FRESH & ONLYS

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Once upon a time, a fellow named Rodriguez recorded two overlooked albums—1970's Cold Fact and 1971's Coming from Reality—and they're both relics of that era's tail end of hippiedom. His songs are earnestly sociopolitical (check out titles like "Crucify Your Mind" and "This Is Not a Song, It's an Outburst: or, the Establishment Blues"), soaked as they are in Dylanesque wordplay, psychedelic whimsy, and the '60s teenage mythology fostered by the Beatles. Rodriguez retreated from music entirely and was long thought dead—there was even a bogus rumor he'd burned to death on stage years before Great White got hot flashes in Rhode Island. Over the years, Rodriguez became a cult star in South Africa without his knowing about it, and now both records have been reissued in the States and hailed as lost classics—which they aren't, exactly, although they're pretty enjoyable. He'll be backed by San Francisco garage rockers the Fresh & Onlys—and it'll be a gas, man. NL Also see Friday's listing.

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