THE GHOST EASE Thurs 5/14 Mississippi Studios

WEDNESDAY 5/13

E-40, STEVIE STONE, COOL NUTZ
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) See My, What a Busy Week!

AND AND AND, KYLE CRAFT, ANIMAL EYES
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Two years ago, I witnessed Kyle Craft blow through a flawless set of material in a weird bar on a weeknight with his previous project, Gashcat, a band that perpetually seemed on the verge of blowing up but, obviously, didn't (possibly due to their profoundly unfortunate name). My prejudice against acoustic guitar and inclination to shit on anything that sounds even remotely like Neutral Milk Hotel notwithstanding, Craft's performance had a pretty big impact on me. Maybe it was because he sang like the entire world was listening despite the fact that there were literally six people in the audience, or maybe it's because his songs felt raw and original, or maybe it's because his version of "Queen Bitch" was one of the best live Bowie covers I've ever heard. A year later, I had the luxury of seeing Craft perform a second time at a house with a terrific new backing band in tow, and it was even better than before: The songs were sharper and indebted to glam touchstones like Mott the Hoople and Ziggy-era Bowie. Tonight Craft will likely perform songs from his forthcoming solo debut, a record that is quickly becoming one of the most anticipated local releases of the year. At the very least, you can say you "saw him when." MORGAN TROPER

THURSDAY 5/14

A CONVERSATION WITH PHILIP GLASS
(Newmark Theatre, 1111 SW Broadway) See My, What a Busy Week!

THE WOOLEN MEN, TALKIES, PATSY'S RATS
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) Waiting for the radio-anointed song of summer? Fuck that: Look no further than Patsy's Rats' miraculous, phenomenal "Rock & Roll Friend," the opening cut on their ripping self-titled EP. You can hear it now on Bandcamp, or wait for a vinyl release on La-Ti-Da Records later this summer. (Actually, don't wait.) It's a heartfelt, joyous, and sorrowful ode to a departed friend with real depth of feeling, but instead of wallowing in loss, it's a ridiculously addictive tune, an affirmation of life and music and friendship and fun. Patsy's Rats is the newish band from Patsy Gelb (daughter of Giant Sand's Howe Gelb) and Christian Blunda (of the Mean Jeans), and they—along with Aaron Lovey and Kyle Baybayan—are making punkish, poppish, popping pop-punk at its very best. "Rock & Roll Friend" is about Mikey Hodges, the terrific musician who recorded and performed as Pop Zeus, and also played with Portland-based bands Boom! and the Memories before being killed in a tragic motorcycle accident in LA in December. As a piece of pop music, it's perfect; as a tribute to a friend, it's raw, human, and real. I dare you to listen to it only once. NED LANNAMANN

THE GHOST EASE, MÁSCARAS, TINY KNIVES
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Since the quietly explosive release of their 2012 self-titled debut, the Ghost Ease have been a staple of Portland's live circuit, performing eye-opening sets at Lose Yr Mind Fest, PDX Pop Now!, and elsewhere. Their second release, the Quit Yer Job EP, is a compact piece of aural dynamite, marking the first time new bassist Laurence Vidal has been caught on tape with the trio. Devotees will note the inclusion of two live staples on the new EP, "Canine" and "XV." The former opens the record, meandering in a narcotic grunge haze, as vocalist/guitarist Jem Marie eerily notes, "There's a body at the window." "Qwi Mai Yab" is something of a ramped-up fuzz-punk scorcher for the Ghost Ease, a band usually noted for methodical cosmic dynamics, but they go for broke here, bursting and heaving. Tonight's show is the official EP release, so bring your dollars, don't miss Máscaras or Tiny Knives, and for land's sake, dance! RYAN J. PRADO

THE ENGLISH BEAT
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Trying to chart the history and various iterations of the English ska band originally known as the Beat is pretty tricky. After busting out of Birmingham with their bouncy blend of reggae, soul, and punk in the late 1970s, the band took alternate names (English Beat, British Beat) to avoid confusion with LA power-pop act the Beat. Then after a mid-’80s breakup, members formed bands with names like Special Beat and the International Beat. Now, no fewer than three bands are touring the world playing the hits (“Mirror in the Bathroom,” “Hands Off... She’s Mine”) that made the band famous. One of those bands—the one starring founding singer/songwriter Dave Wakeling—is currently working on the Beat’s first studio full-length in 33 years. If you’d like to help the cause, look it up on pledgemusic.com. BEN SALMON

TRUCKFIGHTERS, SONS OF HUNS
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Groove. It's not just for disco and hip-hop. Heavy rock 'n' roll can have groove, too. It's that riff that puts you on your heels and sets you to strutting. It's that smooth bass line that ignites your hips, reminding them there's a reproductive organ betwixt them. Sons of Huns are Portland's triumvirate of rocking, heavy groove. Stomping rhythms and psychedelic, slithering licks abound on any cut Sons of Huns lay down. And not only do these local boys have groove, they also have the clout to pull in the likes of Dale Crover (Melvins) and Wino Weinrich (Saint Vitus, Hidden Hand, everything) to do guest spots on their forthcoming record, While Sleeping Stay Awake. With stamps of approval coming from champions like that, you know Sons of Huns have the swagger and confidence to get your head bobbing. ARIS WALES

GREEN JELLÖ, HEADLESS PEZ, BLACKWITCH PUDDING, CLACKAMAS BABY KILLERS
(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) I'm not gonna lie. I used to rock the fuck out of Green Jellö, particularly their major label debut, Cereal Killer Soundtrack. The band's heavy riffage, over-the-top theatrics, and adolescent humor were perfect for a 13-year-old during the heyday of MTV. Characters like the Cowgod, Shitman, the Skajaquada, and the Three Little Pigs figured mightily in my teenage development (this could explain a lot, come to think of it). Green Jellö was sometimes ridiculed as a poor man's GWAR, which is unfair, as the band not only wrote embarrassingly catchy metal songs, their claymation music videos stood out among all the self-serious bands of the '90s and all their self-serious music videos. Green Jellö was forced to change their name to Green Jelly in '92, but it looks as though they are back to their original name. Apparently Kraft Foods, along with most everyone else, has forgotten about them. Not me, though. Green Jellö will always have a warm and sticky place in my heart. SANTI ELIJAH HOLLEY

FRIDAY 5/15

TORRES, AERO FLYNN
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Torres.

SIOUX FALLS, CAREGIVER, TRASHLORD, BLOWOUT
(SMART Collective, 6923 SE Foster) As a new resident in the Foster-Powell neighborhood, I've been busy familiarizing myself with some of the great shops and restaurants hidden in the shadow of Mt. Tabor. In addition to Green Noise Records and banh mi sandwiches galore, the area is home to the SMART Collective skate shop, one of the most active all-ages art and music spaces in the city. Tonight the venue plays host to a stacked bill that should wrap up before any other shows get started, giving you no reason to skip out. Trashlord bring their sludgy blend of shoegaze that they've accurately dubbed "powerslop" down from Seattle, and they're joined by some outstanding local acts, including the fast rising pop-punk quartet Blowout, the raw and earnest emo outfit Caregiver, and the underrated Sioux Falls, whose outstanding 2014 release, Lights Off for Danger, serves up some twanged and fanged Pacific Northwest guitar-rock comfort food. CHIPP TERWILLIGER

APARTMENT FOX, ACID FARM, MOOD ORGAN, DJ PATRICIA HALL
(Beacon Sound, 3636 N Mississippi) Beacon Sound, a record store that specializes in electronic and avant-garde music, will host local techno guru Apartment Fox's (Alex Neerman) Traded Structures EP release. The release is out on Seattle's Motor Collective, a label that has a history of curating quality techno and experimental gems. Traded Structures wastes no time in getting to the business of making you dance, whether it be with your feet or your brain. Swirling rhythms change slowly and hypnotically under a pulsating onslaught of arpeggios and haunting yet sassy synth lines. The release pays homage to the currently popular sound of old-school techno in that it uses many of the same recognizable iconic drum sounds, but the innovative substance of each song makes Apartment Fox stand out in a memorable way. CHRISTINA BROUSSARD

MOONDRAKE, R.I.P., ANIMAL THROAT, BITCH SCHOOL
(Kenton Club, 2025 N Kilpatrick) Don't be lulled by the back cover photo of Bitch School's new full-length, Bite Down on This, which shows the four women of the Portland punk band lounging on a zebra-print blanket surrounded by well-loved vinyl copies of Best of Dolly Parton and Elvis Presley's Blue Hawaii. Bitch School is here to ROCK, and they're not going to be gentle. (You were warned; the image also includes albums by AC/DC and Portland punk band the Lovesores.) Bite Down on This, issued on cherry-red vinyl, is a 10-song blast of caffeinated beats and chainsaw guitars, with winning song titles like "Drink Stealer," "I Got Dissed by Dave Mustaine," and (my personal favorite) "Bitch Salad." Loud, cranked-up punk rock is the name of Bitch School's game, and they're gonna leave a mark. NL

DYLAN LEE JOHNSTON, LOUISA FORD, CHRIS MILLER
(Al's Den, 303 SW 12th) Louisa Ford has no music online yet, has played only a handful of shows, but is already pretty well known. She's the younger sister of Sallie Ford, so talent, it seems, runs in the family. As heard on the few demos circulating from Louisa, she shows an affinity for the same rock 'n' roll flag-bearing as her sister, but her melodies, refrains, and harmonies recall the leisurely timbre of Mary Ford (no relation) more than Wanda Jackson. "Treadin' Water" is a ham-radio-filtered backporch jam, Louisa's vocals taking on a jazz patina, channeling Ella Fitzgerald and Nina Persson. She'll be performing solo at Al's Den tonight, as will Chris Miller, who through his longtime pseudonym Green Hills Alone quietly released one of the more engaging listens, local or otherwise, of 2014. RJP

SATURDAY 5/16

TADADA: WHITE HINTERLAND, DJ BEYONDADOUBT, DJ COOKY PARKER
(The Redd, 831 SE Salmon) See My, What a Busy Week!

COPY, PHONE CALL, NATURAL MAGIC
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our article on Copy.

THE REZILLOS, KID CONGO POWERS AND THE PINK MONKEY BIRDS, THE CHEMICALS
(Dante's, 350 W Burnside) If you draw a map of the intersections of blues and punk, Kid Congo Powers would be starred right smack dab in the middle. His guitar work charged the sounds of the Gun Club, the Cramps (circa Psychedelic Jungle), and the Bad Seeds, infusing Muddy Waters' sense of melody with Hasil Adkins' outlandish freakouts. His current solo work, backed by the Pink Monkey Birds, explores a more eccentric swath of influences, drawing deeper from John Waters-esque camp and primal blues-rock stomp. Powers and the Pink Monkey Birds are joined by the Rezillos, a group of Scottish art-student freaks who might just sound grosser than the Cramps (in a good way, of course). MAC POGUE

DAVID TORN
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) David Torn is the very model of a working musician. The New Yorker plies his wares to anyone who will have him, or at least anyone who needs futuristic guitar sounds for an album or soundtrack. That has led the 61-year-old to work with a cast of thousands: Madonna, David Bowie, the Coen brothers, Spike Jonze, Jan Garbarek, and Mark Isham. This flexibility as a player makes his own compositions and albums fascinating, as they can go absolutely anywhere. On his latest full-length, Only Sky, he exercises restraint, with small flashes of flair peeking through his slowly unfolding, smoldering melodies. And like fellow guitar burner Nels Cline, Torn uses effects pedals with great care to complement rather than overshadow his deeply emotional performances. ROBERT HAM

MAGPIES, MOON DEBRIS, WISHES
(Turn! Turn! Turn!, 8 NE Killingsworth) Missoula has long been a cool town, but not really one with a ton of musical associations. Up to now, claiming Steve Albini and Jeff Ament as natives and having its Orange Street Food Farm name-dropped in a Decemberists song (Colin Meloy is from Helena, remember) are among its biggest musical moments. Which is not to say that the Missoula quartet Magpies are going to change that anytime soon, but based on their most recent record, Tornado, it could happen. Officially their third full-length since 2009, Tornado is a fresh and intense collection, a real patchouli killer, with singers Tolan Harber and Samantha Pollington trading off vocals in pursuit of that time-honored loud-quiet-loud aesthetic and pulling it off (it doesn't hurt that Harber does a spot-on Thurston Moore, either). Your secret's out, Missoula. JEREMY PETERSEN

JOHANNA WARREN
(Sun Gate Studio, 2215 NE Alberta) Johanna Warren has a busy summer lined up. Among other gigs, she'll play Tacoma's Spring Fairy Festival in May, Breitenbush Hot Springs in June, and the Oregon Country Fair in July. Each of the above sound like fitting places to see the Portland singer/songwriter play her gorgeous, gauzy folk. Before any of that, Warren will celebrate the release of her new album Nūmūn with a show tonight at a yoga studio on Alberta. Sequenced and released to properly align with the phases of Earth's moon, Nūmūn is an 11-song exercise in celestial beauty and spiritual exploration via songs built mostly from entrancing acoustic guitar and Warren's softhearted, skyward vocals. It's lovely stuff, whether you just want to soak in something beautiful or you're searching for something bigger. BEN SALMON

SUNDAY 5/17

GUANTANAMO BAYWATCH, THE BUGS, THE COURTNEYS
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

JESSICA HOPPER READING AND CONVERSATION WITH ERIKA M. ANDERSON
(Beacon Sound, 3636 N Mississippi) Read our article on Jessica Hopper.

OREGON SYMPHONY, STEPHEN HOUGH
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) The night of December 8, 2008, remains lodged in my memory because globally adored pianist Stephen Hough happened to team up with the Oregon Symphony that evening, and witnessing it made me instantly fall crazy in love with classical music forever and always. I've been lucky enough to catch this masterful Brit perform a few more times since then, and each experience is filled with unforgettable musical moments that boost his Portland fanbase to new levels of devotion. Some classical soloists impress with their unflappable technique or their blatant showmanship, but Mr. Hough—most often fueled by fine dark chocolate and several cups of tea—somehow manages to unite clear virtuosity on the keyboard with the impression of being constantly challenged, reminding us that what he is doing is impossible for most mortals. With an early Beethoven concerto on tap this afternoon and Monday night, our hometown orchestra hosts Hough for the final concerts of their 2014/2015 season, and it promises to be something rare in the world of classical music: fun. BRIAN HORAY

LIÉ, KOBAN, MALL CASTE, WARM HANDS
(High Water Mark, 6800 NE MLK) From early 2007 until late 2008, Vancouver, BC's underground punk scene flourished under the roof of the Emergency Room art space. While its existence may have been brief, the influence surrounding the space can be felt today. White Lung have brought their snarling post-punk to a national level, while other acts from the Emergency Room's heyday, like the fierce noise-rock outfit Mutators, are gone but not forgotten. Post-punk trio Lié is a prime example of how the spirit of the Emergency Room continues to inform Vancouver's underground. On the band's 2014 album, Consent, guitarist Ashlee Luk sculpts some Greg Sage-influenced guitar riffs with the urgent and driving rhythm section of drummer Kati J and bassist Britt West. The album packs a razor-sharp edge that matches its fearless attack on rape culture, leaving you emotionally stirred and attentive for its 22-minute duration. CT

TIMBER TIMBRE, XIU XIU
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Timber Timbre prey on rock's childish lust for attention, peddling discomfitingly breezy Nick Cave-esque pop against snooze-worthy refrains of "hot dreams of you babe." Their music videos toss around decontextualized imagery of strippers with bags over their heads and circus-sideshow acts, with all of the forethought of a latter-day Jet single. If you can look past the Howard Stern-esque antics of their lyrical and visual content, they offer up a poppy, more Americana-obsessed take on Dirty Beaches' vernacular. I can't help but wonder, however, if the band thought of themselves when writing their song "Bring Me Simple Men." They play tonight with Xiu Xiu, a band whose lengthy body of work presents more thoughtful takes on the intersections of politics, sex, and America with subtle songs like "Dear God, I Hate Myself." MP

INSTANT COMPOSERS POOL ORCHESTRA
(Redeemer Lutheran Church, 5431 NE 20th) Founded in 1967, the Instant Composers Pool Orchestra are a sterling example of how improvisation can be thrilling. Although they have fun interpreting tunes from the jazz canon, the Dutch ensemble's best work is when they're completely without structure, bringing their collective experience to bear on songs that can swing as hard as the best early bop singles or explode into the most glorious chaos you've ever heard. And what each member of this 10-piece group (including legends like clarinet/sax player Ab Baars, violinist Mary Oliver, and drummer Han Bennik) expresses throughout is the pure joy of making a tuneful racket with some of your closest friends. RH

MONDAY 5/18

EAR CANDY: DIESTO, SIOUX
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See My, What a Busy Week!

OREGON SYMPHONY, STEPHEN HOUGH
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) See Sunday's listing.

VAADAT CHARIGIM, GRANDPARENTS, PSYCHOMAGIC
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Grandparents and Psychomagic are proof that “psych” has become just about the worst umbrella term to describe a band. These two local bands are, like, in different realms of existence, man. While Grandparents’ clean ray-gun pop landed their song “Cassingle” (Kids in the Alley) a premiere on Noisey, Psychomagic have continued recruiting minions to join their lo-fi punk cult with their newest album, Bad Ideas, released on LA label Lolipop Records. What these bands do have in common is that they remain two of the hardest working and most dance-inspiring bands in the Portland independent music scene. Just simply slapping the “’60s garage influence” sticker on these groups would be doing them a grave injustice. CAMERON CROWELL Also, read our article on Vaadat Charigim.

ELVIS PERKINS, ALEX SALCIDO, PETER OREN
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) It's been a while, Elvis Perkins. To be exact, it's been six years since the release of the fairly rollicking Elvis Perkins in Dearland, Perkins' sophomore effort and follow-up to 2007's elegiac Ash Wednesday. Highly influenced by the untimely deaths of his parents (photographer Berry Berenson in the 9/11 attacks and actor Anthony Perkins nearly a decade prior), those records introduced his moody, literate style with songs of often moving sensitivity—nowhere more so than on that debut's title track. Perkins' new album, I Aubade, gives us some idea what he's been up to since, the self-recorded, self-produced full-length arriving on his own Mir label. It's a quirky, lo-fi effort that brings to mind some of Syd Barrett's more lucid moments, and requires perhaps a certain patience of the listener, even for fans of his earlier work. The good news is that after six years away, Elvis Perkins continues to reward that patience. JP

TUESDAY 5/19

RHIANNON GIDDENS, BHI BHIMAN
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Read our article on Rhiannon Giddens.

TRUE WIDOW, MUSCLE AND MARROW
(White Owl Social Club, 1305 SE 8th) Metal has so many sub-genres these days that it can be dizzying—mostly in good ways. True Widow have been flying their own "stonegaze" flag for years. Their music is as soothing as it is intense. And with each new record, the Texas trio tweaks and perfects its slow-burning heavy rock with new guitar tricks and left-turn dynamics. Their last LP, 2013's Circumambulation, picked up the tempo while still incorporating plenty of riffs and washed-out guitars. It's nice to know they're not resting on their laurels, but expanding within the sound they created. There's been a gap since then. I think it's safe to say there are more surprises on the horizon—perhaps they'll test-drive some new material tonight. Buckle up. MARK LORE

G.B.H., FANG, HAMMERED GRUNTS
(Dante's, 350 W Burnside) Punk bands seem to come and go like empty bottles, but G.B.H. is the ever-fabled bottomless 40. They are grimy, thick, and make you constantly feel like you're one sip away from puking, but somehow there's always more to be had. The English street punk band is like the William S. Burroughs of hardcore: You thought they'd be the first to go, but they've managed to be resilient and conscious into old age. What I'm getting at is that G.B.H. has been together for well over 30 years, and have hardly deviated from their original thrashy sound. They've found their niche and stuck with it, almost entirely free from the scoffs of punk puritans. Whether you've started to forget the words or never knew them in the first place, it doesn't matter. Just expect a fast-paced, youthful energy. CAMERON CROWELL