SHAMIR Mon 9/28 Star Theater

WEDNESDAY 9/23

AUTECHRE, CYGNUS, ROB HALL
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Read our article on Autechre.

MADELEINE PEYROUX, STEPHANIE SCHNEIDERMAN
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) To the non-aficionado, the idea of "good jazz" seems to imply something from the past. We drool over old greats like Miles Davis and Thelonious Monk (rightfully so), but the idea of current jazz gets tossed aside or written off as something as vanilla as Muzak. Yet modern jazz culture is alive, vibrant, and still producing greats, one of which is jazz vocalist/songwriter Madeleine Peyroux. A good starting point might be her 2004 covers album, Careless Love, a well-thought-out collection of tunes from songwriters like Elliott Smith and Leonard Cohen that gives them a classic, jazzy, lilting feel. Peyroux has one of the most smooth, endearingly warm voices I've ever heard, and I can give you only one word for her upcoming show at the Aladdin—go. ROBIN BACIOR

GREG GRAFFIN
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) Greg Graffin might just be the most prolific face of the 1980s punk and hardcore scene. His legendary work on Bad Religion's 16 albums covered many eras of punk, including the era when everybody (except Crass) was considered a sellout by legions of hardcore-punk evangelicals. As those same bitter old bros declared that punk was dead, Graffin took the route of academia, earning a doctorate in zoology from Cornell while still making music both with Bad Religion and as an Americana solo artist. Now Graffin tours as much for music as he does to speak on evolution, making book-signing appearances, and visiting talking-head news shows where anchors inevitably joke about punk artists dying. Coming off the release of his latest book, Population Wars, Graffin's Portland appearance will serve as half solo musical performance, and half reading/Q&A session. CAMERON CROWELL

THURSDAY 9/24

TURQUOISE JEEP, RASHEED JAMAL, NEKA AND KAHLO
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See My, What a Busy Week!

AUTECHRE, CYGNUS, ROB HALL
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Read our article on Autechre.

CRIMINAL CODE, LYSOL, DEAD CULT, LUNCH
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) With a burning geometrical figure and red lettering on the album cover, Criminal Code's No Device smacks of another band's debut, the epochal Los Angeles by X. Both albums sound fertilized by their environment, impregnated with the horrors of urbanism colliding with man's ultimate failure in the face of temptation. Both bands could be the soundtrack to the end times, but X and Criminal Code each seem prescient in their recognition that the apocalypse isn't coming. The great modern bedlam of Tacoma, Washington (Criminal Code's hometown), won't burn at the hands of the creator, but instead will be forced to wallow in sin for the rest of eternity. MAC POGUE

LE BUTCHERETTES, SISTER CRAYON, EUREKA THE BUTCHER
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) Le Butcherettes need to be seen to be believed. On record, Teri Gender Bender and her cohorts resemble a hard rock band in possession of grit and talent, but there's not always a ton that'll make them leap from the speakers and grab you by the neck. Onstage, it's a different story. Gender Bender (born Teresa Suarez) becomes an emotional firehose, adding a confrontational theatrical element that doesn't always sit well with the crowds of bros who make up the fanbase of the bands that Le Butcherettes have opened for (Faith No More, Queens of the Stone Age). In past performances, Gender Bender's drenched her '50s housewife costume in blood and brought pieces of raw meat onstage. While these over-the-top shock-rock moves may have receded, the band's power and Gender Bender's undeniable passion make Le Butcherettes a force to reckon with. NED LANNAMANN

FRIDAY 9/25

LAETITIA SADIER, DERADOORIAN
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) In 2012 Angel Deradoorian had a choice: go all-in on another multi-year album and tour cycle with the Dirty Projectors, or pursue a career of her own design. She chose the latter and released her first LP, The Expanding Flower Planet, in 2015. (There was also a detour with Avey Tare's Slasher Flicks, the underrated side project of the Animal Collective member.) Deradoorian's solo record shares little pieces with those groups—the chirping vocal precision of the Projectors, the occasional forward blast-march of Slasher Flicks. But by and large it is more contemplative, soundscape-y, and as wanderously existential as an album title like The Expanding Flower Planet suggests. There are moments when the thing gets rhythmic and groovy, but it may be a different proposition live, where Deradoorian performs alone. In an interview with LA Weekly she described the show as "women singing on a mountain with a loop pedal and a synthesizer." ANDREW R TONRY Also see My, What a Busy Week!

DISENCHANTER, YEAR OF THE COBRA, THE SUN GIANTS, PERFECT MONSTER
(Kenton Club, 2025 N Kilpatrick) It's not easy to label Portland metal trio Disenchanter, as the band deftly traverses the doom and space-rock continuums. Their new album, Strange Creations, lurks in a blues swamp with rusty metal riffs, while the vocals of guitarist Sabine Stangenberg soar to the heavens. It builds upon the band's previous two EPs, which mixed sci-fi imagery and heavy mysticism for some classic Middle-earth metal. The power-trio assemblage works well for Disenchanter, as fuzz bass and caustic six-string work off one another. It's a big sound these heavies are making, and this record-release show should be the hallowed ground on which to witness it. MARK LORE

TAHIRAH MEMORY
(Portland Prime, 121 SW 3rd) Until a year ago, vocalist Tahirah Memory was on a relatively small radar, keeping to the edges of the often overlooked Portland soul jazz scene, known more for her famous Grammy-winning father (Thara Memory) than for her own music. This changed following a fateful meeting with Portland musician Jarrod Lawson, whose self-titled debut album skyrocketed to international success last year. Tahirah's brand-new debut album, Pride, was coproduced by Lawson between stints performing overseas, and it's an upbeat, beautifully crafted ode to the smoother side of soul and jazz. A duet collection of sorts between Memory's silky gymnastic vocals and Lawson's impressive piano talents, it calls to mind artists such as Jill Scott and early Emily King, while keeping to a more classic-jazz backbeat, accented by lush vocal harmonies. While Portland may never really be ready for jazz, this album is continuing proof that something special is going on here. JENI WREN STOTTRUP

MICK JENKINS, STWO, THE MIND, J STOCK, EASY McCOY
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) Like Kendrick Lamar, Mick Jenkins produces a hip-hop sound that immediately engages and demands your attention. Jenkins' dark, ethereal vibe is a little more thoughtful and evocative than your usual thundering hip-hop songs, which often ride repetitive dead-end riffs. Jenkins' music lies in a crossroads between electronic and hip-hop, implementing complexities and beauty from both genres. His career began by performing verses a cappella at Young Chicago Authors, where he gained attention for his skillful performances, eventually leading to collaborating with Saba on a 2012 mixtape called Getcomfortable. Jenkins will take you on an electro-hip-hop journey through love, loss, and his observations on societal issues. ROSE FINN

MUSETTE EXPLOSION, COURTNEY VON DREHLE AND GIDEON FREUDMANN
(The Old Church, 1422 SW 11th) Accordionist Will Holhouser, guitarist Matt Munisteri, and drummer Marcus Rojas aren't hurting for work. The three are fixtures of the New York music scene, playing solo, in various ensembles both tuneful and dissonant, and getting nabbed by artists like David Byrne and Paul Simon for live dates and recording sessions. To add to their already stuffed schedules, the three get together under the name Musette Explosion and perform tributes to bal-musette, the pleasant accordion-driven music that has come to be an aural representation of all things Paris. Even with their formidable skills, the three stick close to the script of this centuries-old genre, adding the requisite amounts of swing and melancholy that will transport you to the French café of your dreams. ROBERT HAM

COLIN STETSON AND SARAH NEUFELD, RYAN SAWYER
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) The first time I heard Colin Stetson, I buried my face in my hands and wept silently at the desk of my temp job, suspended on the seventh floor of a 15-story stack of humans, none of whom were friends. His New History Warfare trilogy of albums bursts at the seams with an excess of humanity, wordlessly plumbing the depths of shame, fear, and hope. That he uses only a baritone saxophone covered in an array of microphones only inspires more bewilderment; I feel like a primitive man viewing a cave painting for the first time, unsure of the bizarre sensation overtaking my body. It's a new experience—rapturous, horrifying and alluring all at the same time. Here he's performing as a duo with Sarah Neufeld, a fellow veteran of Arcade Fire; they released the haunting Never Were the Way She Was earlier this year. MP

SATURDAY 9/26

STAR BAR'S FIFTH ANNIVERSARY: WITCH MOUNTAIN, SERPENTS CAUL, SLEEPING BEAUTIES
(Star Bar, 639 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

SMART COLLECTIVE SECOND ANNIVERSARY PARTY: PANORAMA, HELENS, SUPER SECRET HOT GIRLS CLUB, KYLA PRECOURT, NAKED HOUR, LA GRIPPE, THE WHEREWITHALS, THE HEX TREMORS
(SMART Collective, 6923 SE Foster) See All-Ages Action!

SEXLESS, EMASCULATOR, NICK KRUSE AND THE VICTIMS
(Black Water Bar, 835 NE Broadway) See All-Ages Action!

THE OH HELLOS, JOSEPH
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) At this year's Pickathon, a friend of mine suggested I check out Joseph's set. My reply, predictably, was, "Joseph who?" Turns out, Joseph is the band name chosen by three Portland sisters with otherworldly harmony. The sisters—Allison, Meegan, and Natalie Closner—stood on the Treeline Stage with no accompaniment but their voices, a single acoustic guitar, an occasional tambourine, and the lush fields of Happy Valley behind them. Their three-part harmonies and haunting melodies seemed to encapsulate everything beautiful about our surroundings. At times they call to mind Oregon's other harmonizing sister band, Shook Twins, but Joseph follows more of an Irish and English folk ballad tradition. Originally called Dearborn, they changed their name to Joseph to honor both their grandfather and the town in eastern Oregon where he lived. On their recently released debut album, Native Dreamer Kin, Joseph subtly incorporate additional instrumentation, including keyboards, electric guitar, and percussion, but the simplistic beauty of their music remains uncorrupted. SANTI ELIJAH HOLLEY

COLIN CURRIE, OREGON SYMPHONY
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) This month the Oregon Symphony kicks off its 120th(!) season, hosting the brilliant percussionist Colin Currie tonight through Monday with a bang-up program. The setlist features a modern percussion concerto by Scottish composer James MacMillan, based on a sublime religious chant with 15th-century origins, most commonly thought of as the tune "O Come, O Come Emmanuel." Far from a meek plea, the 1992 composition opens onto a dark, chaotic world in crisis, sounding an alarm in the hopes that someone will hear. The brass blare as the strings twist the familiar melody into an eerie supplication, but eventually listeners are led into calmer waters by a vibraphone's soothing lower register. The concerto's bombastic finale requires double-barreled virtuosity from the soloist. Those gloriously acoustic overtones left lingering in the air after Mr. Currie's final blows upon tubular bells have the potential to cast a rare brand of sonic magic upon an unsuspecting congregation. More importantly, they signify that the oldest band west of the Mississippi is back home at the Schnitz, teaming up with mind-blowing musicians from around the world. I say amen to that. BRIAN HORAY

BLACKALICIOUS, LATEEF THE TRUTHSPEAKER, LIFESAVAS
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) I'm so juiced for the return of Blackalicious. I was coming of age as they were coming up from California, regularly packing clubs in the Northwest around the turn of the millennium. Every show was sharp, zoning in on positive multitudes, dexterous rapping, and crispy, afrofunk retro-futurism. The records are every bit as moving, particularly 2002's Blazing Arrow. A masterwork, it cemented the group's singular sonic and social cosmology. In the mid-'00s, the duo—emcee Gift of Gab and producer Chief Xcel—didn't exactly split, but they did step back. It made some sense, as Gab and X started collaborating in 1987, and during their hiatus they worked with others, grew, and reflected. In 2012, Gab's kidneys failed. Around that time the duo reconvened. The recently released Imani, Vol. 1 is purportedly the first of three new albums, and it delivers like a timely follow-up to Blazing Arrow—crackly soul samples establish place and physicality, bubbling up before the beat kicks in and Gab's flow mesmerizes. It's neither throwback nor au courant, but of Blackalicious' own universe. And, thanks in part to the hiatus, Imani pulses with a live-wire current. ART

SUNDAY 9/27

COLIN CURRIE, OREGON SYMPHONY
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) See Saturday's preview.

GOATSNAKE, BLACK BREATH, BATTALION OF SAINTS, OBLITERATIONS
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) Off the top of my head, Black Breath is the only current band I can think of who uses pit-baiting breakdowns that don't sound cheesy or like a hacker's shortcut to "heavy." These have been deployed more sparsely with each successive album, with the Seattle (by way of Bellingham) band transitioning from death metal-influenced hardcore to hardcore-influenced death metal. And Black Breath's soon-to-be-released third album, Slaves Beyond Death, is a heavy motherfucker. The buzzsaw guitar tone has always put the band's Swedish death metal influences front and center, but vocalist Neil McAdams also sounds more like Tomas Lindberg from At the Gates these days, putting the band's more metallic side over the top. But these are mostly minor adjustments: Black Breath is still all about the riff, and they still deliver those. MATTHEW W. SULLIVAN Also read our article on Goatsnake.

YOU WHO!: THE PRESHALL BRASS, PATTERSON HOOD, & MORE
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) Decemberist Chris Funk and partner Seann McKeel return with their semi-regular children's variety show, You Who!, which is twice as delicious as Yoo-hoo and much better for you. This time they've finagled an appearance from new Portland resident Patterson Hood of Drive-By Truckers (any guesses as to which Truckers tunes Hood will play for the kiddies? "Dead, Drunk, and Naked"? "The Deeper In"?). He'll be joined by the brass band from New Orleans' Preservation Hall and rock 'n' roll haircuts from Rudy's Barbershop (get the "Garfunkel"!). But all this pales in comparison to these six words: blanket forts with Pendleton Woolen Mills. Yes, there will be blanket forts from Oregon's finest blanket maker decorating the Crystal Ballroom, so tell the kids to bring their best fort-making chops and get ready for an afternoon of straight-up joy. NL

STRANGE WILDS, CASUAL HEX, PASS, FEEL YOUNG
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) While Sub Pop continues to expand its roots into the fertile Northwest soil by bringing aboard rising hip-hop acts like Shabazz Palaces and TheeSatisfaction, the label seems equally comfortable in keeping one foot planted in the past. First, Toronto noise-rockers Metz made a big splash with their self-titled Sub Pop debut, and with Strange Wilds, the label has mined another worthy act in line with their early heyday—this time from their own backyard. The Olympia trio's recently released debut, Subjective Concepts, takes hard-hitting melodic hardcore and smothers it with a layer of grimy grunge. In a perfect pairing of college-rock-leaning acts, Strange Wilds are joined tonight by Portland's own Pass. That band's excellent self-titled cassette brings to mind another rich bygone era of guitar rock, the '90s Chapel Hill scene. Anthemic standout "La Chute" is up there with last year's best local tracks. CHIPP TERWILLIGER

UNCLE ACID AND THE DEADBEATS, RUBY THE HATCHET, ECSTATIC VISION
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) It's almost Halloween, the most glorious time of year. A time when the morbid is embraced, when darkness is allowed to slink in and blot out into the light. England's Uncle Acid and the Deadbeats' new record, The Night Creeper, contains the perfect sounds to get your mind right for the encroaching evil. Much like their previous endeavors, The Night Creeper employs Sabbath-esque grooves that swing like a heavy, razor-sharp pendulum, yet have Kevin Starr's inviting, Beatles- and Bee Gees-like vocal melodies laid gently over the top. It sounds like an odd pairing, but it's actually a fitting combo that makes for spine-tingling stuff, perfect for calmly sharpening a knife to, or inspiring you to walk alone down that alley in the sketchy part of town and see what's hiding in the shadows. ARIS HUNTER WALES

HEX: THE OCCUPANT, NEUTRAL CRUISING, WALTER DIEGO, OPEN MARRIAGE
(Valentine's, 232 SW Ankeny) In all the very necessary conversations about the swelling costs of living in Portland, one aspect that gets overlooked is the potential death of the house/basement show. When four or more young people can't even afford to rent a centrally located house in the city, we run the risk of losing welcome spaces for small noise and experimental concerts. Luckily, spaces like S1, the Projection Museum, and Valentine's are keeping the flag flying for these outré events. Tonight inaugurates a monthly showcase for these hair-raising sounds, created by booker Chris Bigalke and curated by the keen ears of Cody Brant, who's bringing in the unnerving loops and digital sprawl of Neutral Cruising, some truly inspired guitar insanity from Open Marriage, and Walter Diego's melted pop-culture mining. RH

JESS GLYNNE, FRANCESCO YATES
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) If you get down and funky to soulful English pop, then you'll cream your leotard when you hear Jess Glynne. Nothing short of ultra-danceable and catchy, Glynne puts an artful spin on what could be considered mainstream pop, with memorable melodies and a smoky, Adele/Ellie Goulding-esque voice. Her tracks are melodic enough to play on the piano and still sound ear-catching, and although her lyrics revolve around the usual tales of heartbreak and being an independent woman, her songs remain sophisticated and poetic. Glynne's music is too accessible, fun, and well-made to go unnoticed—see her now before you're dancing to her songs at aerobics class for the 130th time. RF

MERO, VALLEY MAKER
(The Waypost, 3120 N Williams) When not playing music as Valley Maker, Austin Crane can be found at the University of Washington, pursuing a PhD in human geography. Rather than conflict with each other, these two paths effectively serve one another, as Crane's songwriting explores the shifting relationship between people and their environment, their culture, and each other. Taking his moniker from the Smog song, Valley Maker composes delicately strummed story-songs, influenced in part by his native South and his evangelical upbringing. Valley Maker began in 2010, when Crane recorded Yes I Know I've Loved This World as his University of South Carolina senior thesis project, with each song based on stories from the Book of Genesis. The new album, When I Was a Child, is an understated and beautiful rumination on grace and desire, as sung by one who has spent his life in pursuit of and retreat from both. SEH

MINT MILE, JOEL RL PHELPS AND THE DOWNER TRIO, ZEBRA HUNT
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Despite Silkworm's 18-year run—which saw them start their career on the same label that fostered the Melvins and Built to Spill, and included working with Steve Albini on multiple albums and having a documentary made about them—their name doesn't even register with most people. Those who do know them usually border on obsessive, though, and tonight is a dream lineup for said obsessives. Founding member Joel RL Phelps, whose early contributions to the Silkworm catalog are among their most unsettling and beguiling, brings his Downer Trio (now in their 20th year as a band) from Seattle. And fresh off their glorious run as Bottomless Pit, fellow Silkworm members Tim Midyett and Andrew Cohen bring their new project Mint Mile over from Chicago to headline the night. While all these musicians are most easily defined by their previous lives in Silkworm, they don't rest on their great back catalog but continue to make fresh and interesting music three decades into their careers. JOSHUA JAMES AMBERSON

MONDAY 9/28

CHELSEA WOLFE, WOVENHAND
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) See My, What a Busy Week!

MEW, THE DODOS
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) See My, What a Busy Week!

THE WOOLEN MEN, LANDLINES, HONEY BUCKET
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our article on the Woolen Men.

LIL DOWAGER, U SCO, TYRANTS
(Anarres Infoshop, 7101 N Lombard) See All-Ages Action!

COLIN CURRIE, OREGON SYMPHONY
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) See Saturday's preview.

SHAMIR, ALLIE X
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) Shamir emerged from the Vegas suburbs with an androgynous-sounding countertenor voice and an utterly unmapped sound, anchored in house and electrofunk but omnivorous in all other influences. As a result, Shamir's first full-length, Ratchet, received rapturous response from critics but has yet to make a large impact on the public, who probably don't know what to make of its surprising, mischievous blend of deep club beats, Minneapolis funk jams, outer-space torch songs, and schoolyard jump-rope rhymes. It's only a matter of time before Shamir's unique vision is assimilated into the mainstream, but for right now, salvos like "On the Regular" and "Call It Off" are weird, wild dance-pop songs that we can only image were beamed in from an alternate dimension. North Las Vegas—that's an alternate dimension, isn't it? NL

CROOKS ON TAPE, 1939 ENSEMBLE, BOB SCHRINER
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Crooks on Tape frontman John Schmersal is anything but a thief. A quick glance at Schmersal's résumé reveals him to be one of underground rock's most criminally unsung players, but that's the only offense a background check is going to turn up. As the guitarist in Dayton, Ohio's tragically short-lived but highly influential '90s noise-rock outfit Brainiac, Schmersal's skronky, frenetic style paved the way for the '00s post-punk revival. Schmersal spent that decade fronting Enon, where he successfully combined the left-field tendencies of his previous band with some downright pleasing pop and rock. More recently, he's kept busy as the touring bassist for Caribou, while also finding time for two new outlets of his own: Merge Records signees Vertical Scratchers showcase Schmersal's strong and focused melodic sensibilities, while Crooks on Tape sees him collaborating with former Enon bandmate Rick Lee and percussionist Joey Galvan by whittling down long improvisational sessions into subverted ear-expanding pop. CT

TUESDAY 9/29

EAR CANDY: MISSION SPOTLIGHT, ROSELIT BONE, GHOST TO FALCO
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See My, What a Busy Week!

GODFLESH, PRURIENT, USNEA
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) When Godflesh made its triumphant return to Portland in April 2014, the touring bill, while great, wasn't what was originally intended for the band's first stateside tour in nearly a decade. Visa snafus caused by the government shutdown derailed the Brits' initial attempt to tour with noise luminary Prurient. Now both bands are getting a redo, with the industrial-metal pioneers in Godflesh still riding the success of a towering comeback record (last year's A World Lit Only by Fire). In the interim, Prurient mastermind Dominick Fernow released the sprawling double album Frozen Niagara Falls, the best thing he's produced since steering the project into less harsh territory on 2011's Bermuda Drain. MWS