PURE BATHING CULTURE Tues 10/27 Mississippi Studios
Shervin Lainez

WEDNESDAY 10/21

GHOST, PURSON
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) See My, What a Busy Week!, and read our article on Purson.

POTTY MOUTH, SABONIS, BLOWOUT
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See My, What a Busy Week!

DUNGEN
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Read our article on Dungen.

PWRHAUS, LEO, DJ HONEST JOHN
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Tonight Pwrhaus unveils not one but two EPs of sweet, sad soul: One's called Is Love Enough and the other is How I Feel About You, and both have plenty to recommend them. If you're familiar with Pwrhaus' past efforts—and the heartsick songwriting of frontman Tonality Star—these songs' arcing melodies and dreamy, gauzy backdrop won't come as a huge surprise, but their immediacy is perhaps the most direct Star has sounded since mysteriously leaving copies of his first LP anonymously in Portland record stores. This double-EP release show comes on the heels of a successful European tour Pwrhaus undertook with fellow Portland-based musician Peter Broderick (who sadly had to drop from tonight's bill), and there's promise of ever newer Pwrhaus material around the corner, as ever. NED LANNAMANN

SUBHUMANS, RVIVR, ARCTIC FLOWERS
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) Brawny but not unthinking, sub-literate but well-read, Subhumans popularized anarcho-punk in the early to mid-'80s UK. Their supercharged punk—a wiry (but not Wire-y), adventurous version of populist pub rock—soundtracked Thatcher-era discontent and the fear of totalitarianism from within. Members of the Subhumans went on to form the semi-popular ska-punk group Citizen Fish, and are likely waiting for the day when the ska revival beats out the twinkly be-sweatered emo renaissance in the battle for cultural supremacy. Local icy punks Arctic Flowers open, and Olympia's Rvivr tops out the support slots, playing their first show in Portland since probably last Tuesday afternoon. MAC POGUE

DJANGO DJANGO, WILD BELLE
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Django Django is a band that's hard to grasp. The London quartet's 2012 self-titled debut was an odd little bedroom creation that turned into a big hit and critical success, thanks to its hyper-rhythmic vibe, icy sense of melody, and kaleidoscopic approach to modern psychedelia. The album felt slippery and a bit standoffish, but turned out to be a grower—a testament to Django Django's sneakily sticky songs. The band's sophomore album, Born Under Saturn, came out in May and feels much the same: It won't blow your mind, but it may just keep bouncing around your brain 'til it's got the whole thing locked down. Opening for Django Django tonight is Wild Belle, a Chicago brother/sister band that employs a similarly beat-driven brand of pop, with singer Natalie Bergman injecting a considerable dose of bluesy, post-punk sneer into the mix. BEN SALMON

THURSDAY 10/22

SLIPKNOT, SUICIDAL TENDENCIES, BEARTOOTH
(Memorial Coliseum, 300 N Winning Way) All-Ages Action!

PIG HEART TRANSPLANT, DREAMDECAY, PRIVATE ROOM
(Black Water Bar, 835 NE Broadway) All-Ages Action!

THE ZOMBIES
(Revolution Hall, 1300 SE Stark) Read our article on the Zombies.

DAVE RAWLINGS MACHINE
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) Read our article on Dave Rawlings Machine.

COHEED AND CAMBRIA, KNAPSACK, THANK YOU SCIENTISTS
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) It's been 17 years since emo watershed This Conversation Is Ending Starting Right Now was released by melodic punks Knapsack. Indicative as it was of Northern California's underground hybrid of heavy guitar progressions and soul-crushing lyrical pessimism, songs like "Katherine the Grateful" and "Shape of the Fear" became anthems for those caught in the chasm between rowdy punk and thoughtful pop. These opuses were augmented by the whispery vocals of Blair Shehan (who, after Knapsack's breakup in 2000, went on to form the critically acclaimed the Jealous Sound). The addition of Samiam's Sergie Loobkoff was another instrumental development in Knapsack's sound, emotive and rudimentary as it was. The band's pairing with the over-the-top sci-fi prog of Coheed and Cambria is interesting, though I suspect a mass exodus immediately following Knapsack's much-anticipated set. RYAN J. PRADO

FIDLAR, DUNE RATS
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) The year is 2013, and through a thick layer of Los Angeles smog pokes the skate-punk underbelly. Fueled by drug-infused silliness, stick 'n' poke tats, and high-energy DIY shows in parking lots for hundreds of drunk bicyclists, FIDLAR's self-titled debut LP defined, in a way, a moment in LA's underground music history. It was as much about hedonistic parties with "Cheap Beer" and "Cocaine" as it was fuzzy and infinitely catchy power chords. Fast-forward two years—now FIDLAR find themselves in another parking lot south of Los Angeles for Burgerama, only they are backed by 30-foot-tall cardboard cutouts of themselves and the crowd is made up of thousands of young people there for FIDLAR's first show in over a year. This is the abridged version of frontman Zac Carper & Co.'s journey from first album, to hiatus and rehab, to local legend, then finally back to sobriety and second LP. CAMERON CROWELL

GAZEBOS, QUAALUDES, APPENDIXES, SLOPPY KISSES
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) The song "Sauna" by Seattle band Gazebos is a handbook for healing and radical self-acceptance in the disguise of a hazy, four-minute power-pop punk number. Singer Shannon Perry (who I'm familiar with through her sublime, cartoonish tattoo work) leads the listener through a list of steps to free oneself from "brain-jail." The whole song is based on the crux of allowing yourself to feel bad—whereas so much rock 'n' roll focuses on the shame of life's lowest moments, Gazebos let you know that hitting rock bottom isn't so terrible. How could you know the joy of staying afloat if you didn't know what the bottom of the pool felt like? MP

FRIDAY 10/23

FLEETMAC WOOD: WHITE WINGED LOVE DISCO
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

PORTLAND STATE OF MIND MUSIC FESTIVAL
(PSU's Smith Memorial Student Union, 1825 SW Broadway) See My, What a Busy Week!

ANNALISA TORNFELT AND THE SOUND OUTSIDE, MICHAEL HURLEY, MIKE COYKENDALL
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Annalisa Tornfelt's first solo album, The Number 8, only came out a few short months ago, but the fiddlist/guitarist/nyckelharpist/vocalist/etc. already has a second album ready to go. Search Zero, coming out on Adam Shearer's Woodphone Records, is a collection of covers, including tunes by Simon and Garfunkel, Kathleen Edwards, Ian and Sylvia, and more. And while I haven't heard it yet, Tornfelt's interpretative powers—so evident in her work with Black Prairie and countless other roots-music ensembles in the Portland area—have me unreservedly recommending tonight's album release show. She's backed tonight by Sallie Ford's old band, the Sound Outside, and is joined by her two sisters on harmonies. NL

WORKS X: EYELIDS, SAMA DAMS, HALEY HEYNDERICKX
(The Old Church, 1422 SW 11th) For the last decade, Works—a yearly cultural showcase bringing together music, art, food, and more—has been on the pulse of Portland's thriving indie scene, with the likes of Ages and Ages, Alialujah Choir, Like a Villain, Kelli Shaefer, and Lost Lander gracing the Old Church stage. Tonight's 10-year celebration is no different, bringing on 2015 breakout bands Sama Dams and Eyelids, along with one of the most buzzed-about new songwriters in the city, Haley Heynderickx. While there is no doubt that Eyelids and Sama Dams, who may feature music from their yet-to-be-released follow-up to the stunning Comfort in Doubt, will be memorable, Heynderickx may just steal the show. Influenced by Luz Elena Mendoza of Y La Bamba, she crafts touching songs accentuated by nuanced vocals, invigorated by a stellar band including members of Typhoon and Big Haunt. JENI WREN STOTTRUP

GARY FLOYD, BLACK IRISH TEXAS, DAVE DICTOR
(Analog Café, 720 SE Hawthorne) This show is actually the first and only Portland screening of the documentary film The Dicks from Texas, which tells the story of the '80s Texas punk band the Dicks. The Dicks have quite a legacy—their music and political stance were pointedly threatening to traditional America. That prolly would'a been enough to cause a hubbub anywhere in 1980, but frontman Gary Floyd was also openly homosexual, so the Dicks turned out to be the biggest kinda countercultural atom bomb, and then were dropped in the middle of Texas. GOD DAMN. Singer and band founder Floyd will also be performing after the screening. MIKE NIPPER

PENGTOBERFEST: DJ DETWEILER, LAUREN BOUSFIELD, FOXDYE, & MORE
(Euphoria, 315 SE 3rd) There seems to be a pervading assumption that electronic musicians have to be very stoic and take themselves seriously in order to be successful. But the world-famous originator of Flute Drop, a style of dance music that replaces the bass drop with a cheesy flute, is proving them all wrong. DJ Detweiler has taken the electronic music world by storm with a highly entertaining blend of killer beats and knee-slapping humor. He's remixed many Top 40 pop stars by dropping that flute at the most (in)opportune time and comically taking a dump on capitalist ethics. But he's no one-trick pony. His original musical and DJ style is good enough to get him booked at all the high-profile electronic music festivals. I guess some would say he's a real entertainer. CHRISTINA BROUSSARD

GEHENNA, THEORIES, LANDMINE MARATHON, WORTHLESS EATERS
(Panic Room, 3100 NE Sandy) Gehenna have been doling out nihilistic, black metal-tinged hardcore since the '90s, but they've been operating under a clunkier moniker in recent years: The Infamous Gehenna. As the press material puts it, the San Diego/Reno band needed to separate itself from the "several weaker acts bearing the Gehenna banner." They've hit the road with a couple other decidedly not-weak acts. On one hand you've got Seattle-based Theories, whose Metal Blade debut, Regression, is a belligerent slab of airtight grindcore. On the other is the long-running Arizona death-grind outfit Landmine Marathon, rounding out one of the strongest top-to-bottom metal bills to roll through town in a while. MATTHEW W. SULLIVAN

THE HAGUE, YOUNG JESUS, WIZARD ATTACK, DOG THIEVES
(The Tardis Room, 1218 N Killingsworth) After breaking up, Chicago band Young Jesus was recently revived by frontman John Rossiter after he moved to LA. His new homebase makes the possibility of Young Jesus 2.0 making frequent jaunts up the West Coast all the more likely—and lo and behold, here they come, playing some of their first shows in the Northwest on the back of a terrific new album, Grow/Decompose. Matching the promise that came with 2012's Home, the new album is heartfelt, scrappy, and full of tightly wound riffs and Rossiter's oddly familiar granite voice. It's a fantastic, understated rock album, so let's hope we get more visits from Young Jesus in the months to come. Tonight's a good start. NL

SATURDAY 10/24

FLORENCE AND THE MACHINE, THE GHOST OF A SABER TOOTH TIGER
(Memorial Coliseum, 300 N Winning Way) See My, What a Busy Week!

TCHAIKOVSKY'S SYMPHONY NO. 5: YOLANDA KONDONASSIS, OREGON SYMPHONY
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) Eighty years after Beethoven's Fifth burst onto the music scene, a closeted Russian named Pete Tchaikovsky composed his own Symphony No. 5, responding to the impact of that epic earlier work through his own sublimely colorful orchestration, unparalleled knack for melody, and instillation of ennobling spirit. Some readers may roll their eyes after such a lofty description, but they are forgiven because their hearts are likely insulated by soulless pop and shallow, self-centered whining piped in through tiny earbuds. Witnessing scores of highly trained musicians working together on one stage to bring this powerhouse symphony to life will erase any doubts about Tchaikovsky's genius or the unique thrill of unplugged sound. And bonus: Our Oregon Symphony bucks tradition before intermission by welcoming Yolanda Kondonassis on solo harp (!) to perform a 20th-century concerto by Argentine composer Alberto Ginastera. The program premieres tonight with encore performances tomorrow and Monday, so the chances to experience sonic greatness at the Schnitz abound. BRIAN HORAY

DRAKE AND CAKE
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Twenty-nine years ago today, in a galaxy far, far away (Toronto, Ontario), a child of mixed African American and Jewish Canadian heritage was born and christened with the name Aubrey Drake Graham. For better or worse, the former child actor went on to single-handedly usher in a new era of hip-hop, where it is perfectly okay to sing sometimes and to get emotional and talk about feelings and stuff. He's topped every chart ever, won every award there is to win, and appeared on what seems like every hip-hop album in the last five years. Say what you will about Drake, the boy is determined. Celebrate the birth of October's Very Own, with local DJs spinning his billions of hits, in addition to plenty of deep cuts, remixes, collabos, and OVO affiliates. Bonus points if you roll up in a wheelchair. SANTI ELIJAH HOLLEY

LITTLE WINGS, HELVETIA, SAM COOMES
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Jason Albertini has quietly spent the last decade building one of the most prolific and undersung bodies of work within the indie-rock world. His band Helvetia's last release, 2012's Nothing for Rambling, marked their seventh album in six years. Tonight, Helvetia are celebrating the release of Dromomania, their first new release in three years. While that gap could have had something to do with Albertini's role as bassist in Built to Spill, that wouldn't tell the whole story. It turns out a massive computer meltdown wiped out a nearly completed album back in 2013. Fortunately, those songs were recently recovered and released as A Dot Running for the Dust (The Lost Sessions), which makes for an excellent companion piece to Dromomania. Both releases showcase Albertini's ability to neatly package warm and familiar moments within unconventional song structures, allowing his music to please the senses, while still maintaining an unpredictable and adventurous edge. CHIPP TERWILLIGER

YACHT, LARRY GUS
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) The seemingly made-for-internet duo Jona Becholt and Claire L. Evans make up the Portland originating dance-pop band Yacht. Though they've since taken their cheery electronic melodies and overlapping vocals to Los Angeles, Yacht's waves of influence can still be felt throughout the local music scene. Over the span of six full-length albums and 13 years, Yacht has about as eclectic a discography as dance-pop catalogs get, from simple synthesizer releases akin to LCD Soundsystem ("Shangri-La"), to speed-glitchy electro-pop that without the lyrics could be deep house ("Le Gordon"). Last week Yacht released their sixth studio album, I Thought the Future Would Be Cooler, on Sony subsidiary Downtown Records, which shows the band sonically shifting again, this time to a funk-infused electro-pop similar to Random Access Memories-era Daft Punk and Flying Lotus. CC

ED SCHRADER'S MUSIC BEAT
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Part performance artist, part totalitarian dictator, Ed Schrader is maybe one of the more outré acts to come from weird Baltimore (among the likes of syllabic screamers Ponytail and modern-day pigfuck practitioners Dope Body). Schrader and his Music Beat, while superficially working in the realm of nervy punks like Devo, belong in a category of new minimalism with the likes of Majical Cloudz and Little Joy-era My Disco. Live, the Music Beat experience is that of Schrader incanting bizarre Mark E. Smith-worthy stories while banging on a lit-up floor tom, accompanied by nerdy hesher Devin Rice. The effect is invigorating, forcing viewers to parse each note of their primal rhythms and Schrader's drunken/drugged/all-too-sober screeds. The motormouth megalomaniac Schrader consumes the room, focusing all attention on him, and the experience couldn't be more exciting. MP

SUNDAY 10/25

THE LEGEND OF ZELDA: SYMPHONY OF THE GODDESSES
(Keller Auditorium, 222 SW Clay) See My, What a Busy Week!, and All-Ages Action!

TCHAIKOVSKY'S SYMPHONY NO. 5
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) See Saturday's preview.

LITA FORD, MADAME TORMENT
(Bossanova Ballroom, 722 E Burnside) Lita Ford's career might have one of the more interesting arcs of any musician, as all of her highs are very much of their time. She was the axe-slinger of seminal '70s act the Runaways, a band that was ridiculed for manager Kim Fowley's "jailbait on the run" pandering, but also lauded for plowing the way for other female rock artists. Ford's post-Runaways output landed smack-dab in '80s hair metal—which played up her teased hair and catsuit-wearing sexpot image—and she scored her biggest hit with Ozzy Osbourne on the power ballad "Close My Eyes Forever." But strip away the gimmicks and the slick production on albums like Lita and Dancin' on the Edge, and you're left with some pretty great pop-metal songs and a woman who can shred the fuck out of a guitar. More impressive and most importantly, Lita Ford accomplished all of this in a man's world. The queen rocks on. MARK LORE

THE KING KHAN AND BBQ SHOW, MILK LINES, IS/IS
(Dante's, 350 W Burnside) Whether it was their mutual appreciation of nipple-exposing stretch turtlenecks, wigs, cod pieces, and Lone Ranger bondage masks that led the premier doo-slop duo the King Khan and BBQ Show to eventually make amends after a dramatic breakup a few years back, these Bad New Boys (the name of their latest LP, under the classic King Khan and BBQ Show banner) seem to have rekindled their friendship. And though they're back to their same old tricks, fusing punky, rudimentary garage rock with doo wop, soul, and rhythm and blues, they're still at the top of their game. BBQ's double-duty ramshackle drum kit and Khan's fierce guitar-playing power forward with smart, raw songs delivered with wry humor and sardonic wit. The King Khan and BBQ Show are always terrific live, making soul-dance nights seem boring by comparison. TRAVIS RITTER

GIVERS, CADDYWHOMPUS
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) For my money, the best set of 2011's MusicfestNW came from Givers, a fresh-faced quintet from Lafayette, Louisiana, that filled the Doug Fir Lounge with two hours of big smiles, bouncy indie pop, and bold African and zydeco sounds. It was absolutely glorious and totally satisfying. Givers toured on beyond that night, of course, but the band—led by Tiffany Lamson and Taylor Guarisco—has been relatively quiet for the past couple of years. That'll change on November 13 when Givers unveils their sophomore album, New Kingdom, which essentially sounds like a continuation of their debut (2011's In Light) but backed by a bigger budget and more time to try out new doodads in the studio. New Kingdom retains the band's "Southern Vampire Weekend" charm while at the same time exploring new moods and textures. Go see 'em tonight and see if they've retained their 2011 live magic, too. BS

DANA BUOY, MRCH, FOREIGN ORANGE, DOUBLE PLUS GOOD
(The Liquor Store, 3341 SE Belmont) Dana Buoy's life in Portland has seemed a little quiet for someone whose credentials include being a member of avant-pop group Akron/Family. Despite the little splashes, Buoy's made good on his promise as an artist, hooking up with Brooklyn's Lefse Records to release the fantastic Summer Bodies in 2012, a whirlpool of bubbling pop perfect for the dog days of August and September, but pretty great for any other time, too. A 2014 tour found Buoy touring with Sylvan Esso in support of his five-song EP, Preacher. In the meantime, Buoy has been popping up at all sorts of Portland venues, including an August date at the Panic Room and tonight in the basement of the Liquor Store. Expect great things for a modest cover, and use the savings on merch. RJP

VALET, CAT HOCH, SINLESS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Honey Owens, the principal force behind Portland psych-rock trio Valet, has been a prominent fixture in Portland's avant-garde and psychedelic rock community for nearly two decades. Over the years, Owens has collaborated with local experimental act Jackie-O Motherfucker, toured as a bassist with Deerhunter's Bradford Cox in his Atlas Sound side project, and created psychedelic house music alongside Rafael Fauria in her latest band, the Miracles Club. Valet isn't a new project; Owens released three intimate and exploratory solo albums under the moniker from 2006 to 2009, but this current iteration of the band adds both Fauria and multi-instrumentalist Mark Burden to the mix. On Nature, Valet's first new album in seven years, Owens' ethereal vocals combine seamlessly with shimmering, focused song structures. It all makes for a stunning record, and one that firmly establishes Valet as an integral piece of city's blossoming shoegaze and psychedelic rock realm. Tonight also marks the release of the new EP from local dream-psych rocker Cat Hoch. CT

ROBIN BACIOR, OLD WAVE
(Rontoms, 600 E Burnside) Robin Bacior's songs come at you like a Viking ship sliding through a foggy dawn toward the light. Creating movement with her simple yet ballet-like piano, and accentuated by simple orchestral elements, Bacior sets the pace in these quieter and fiery moments. Then she draws the listener back with soothing and reassuring vocals. The Portland songwriter (full disclosure: a Mercury contributor) is about to set off on a new journey, supporting her recent album, Water Dreams, at Japan's upcoming Portland Festival, put on by the Japanese branch of Columbia Sportswear. To kick off the trip, she plays a free show (on her birthday!) at Rontoms, one of longtime booker Theo Craig's last events for the bar. In a nod to the future, the night features a secret guest brought on by new talent buyer Boone Howard, and a set by fellow dreamers Old Wave. JWS

MONDAY 10/26

JOYCE MANOR, GIRLPOOL
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) See My, What a Busy Week!, and All-Ages Action!

TCHAIKOVSKY'S SYMPHONY NO. 5
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) See Saturday's preview.

SMALL BLACK, PAINTED PALMS
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Brooklyn-based band Small Black does not fit their name. Their music meanders through grand ethereal forests, more upbeat and with a much richer sound than the name suggests. They do suggest their Brooklyn home in their thoughtful, angsty melodies and fast-paced rhythms, reminding the listener of bustling New York avenues. Their newest album, Best Blues, differs from their breakthrough 2009 EP in its clean sound, gritty rhythms, and more melodic vocals. After three full-lengths, numerous festivals, and doling out remixes like it's the DJ apocalypse, Small Black is well on their way to providing a soundtrack for a Girls episode. ROSE FINN

TUESDAY 10/27

GRIMES, NICOLE DOLLANGANGER
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) See My, What a Busy Week!

PURE BATHING CULTURE, HEATHER WOODS BRODERICK
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Pray for Rain, the new Pure Bathing Culture album, comes out this week, and it's evidence of how the Portland group has evolved in just a couple of short years. The enchanting new collection—the second full-length from the band centered around keyboardist/vocalist Sarah Versprille and guitarist Daniel Hindman—is messier, rawer, less pristine than 2013's Moon Tides, but it's no less dreamy or transporting. The title track is a festival-ready bouncer, and "She Shakes" is a lovely springtime-morning ditty, but perhaps due to producer John Congleton, their sound is less carefully bejeweled, a welcome shift. What is consistent with Pure Bathing Culture's past work is Versprille and Hindman's ability to inject heat-seeking pop missiles in their melodies, aiming them straight for listeners' hearts and making them impossible to dodge. NL Also, read our article on Heather Woods Broderick.

MICHAEL RAULT, BOONE HOWARD, LADYWOLF
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) When music publications start putting out their "Great Albums You Might've Missed" lists for 2015, here's hoping Michael Rault's Living Daylight is on a few of 'em. The Toronto-based singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist's new album was released by psych/garage-rock label du jour Burger Records, and it scored some positive reviews from a few prominent outlets. But it doesn't seem to be getting much chatter otherwise. Which is a shame, because Living Daylight is one of the catchiest records of 2015, a swaggering synthesis of early rock 'n' soul, psychedelic fuzz, glittery glam, and classic pop melodies. You know how some albums sound vaguely like records that came out decades ago, while some sound like actual lost classics, dusted off for the modern world? Rault has pulled off one of the latter—no small feat. BS

ALBERT HAMMOND JR., WALKING SHAPES
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) If you're of the opinion that the Strokes wrote about an album and a half of strong, spritely tunes before devolving into a glossy catastrophe of ego-clashing, with dumb words and worse guitar solos, then this one's for you. Indeed, the further removed we get from the Strokes' heyday, the clearer it becomes whose instincts were sharpest. Because the Strokes were best when they kept it simple and worked as a unit. In that sweet, original, egoless mode, Strokes guitarist Albert Hammond Jr. soldiers on. His rhythm-first playing still relishes the livened beauty of banging on major barre chords and the ping-pong of pointillist melody without trying to peacock. Furthermore, Hammond's solo stuff ain't jaded, ex-rock star whining—rather, it's bright and bouncy, charming and humble. ANDREW R TONRY