DUNGEN
Mississippi Studios, 10/1
Annika Aschberg

THURSDAY 9/30

ARCADE FIRE, CALEXICO

(Memorial Coliseum, 300 N Winning Way) See My, What a Busy Week!, Read our article on Arcade Fire.

THE FUTUREHEADS

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) The flashing guitars and whole-throated choruses of the Futureheads don't leave a lot of room for subtlety, but they don't really need to. Blasting onto the scene with a perfect debut album in 2004, the Sunderland quartet has struggled a little bit to find variations on its post-punk formula, but its fourth album, The Chaos, reveals that keeping things big and loud and shouty works just fine. "Struck Dumb" and "Heartbeat Song" are terrific blasts of electricity, virtually insisting that you fist pump along. Meanwhile, a couple tunes from the first record have found their way into the Rock Band repertoire, ensuring that the Futureheads will continue to be heard by new generations even as radio continues its ugly death throes. Also of note: I managed to write an entire blurb about the Futureheads without once using the word "angular," so... ah crap, I just used it. NED LANNAMANN

CORY CHISEL AND THE WANDERING SONS, THE PARSON RED HEADS, KASEY ANDERSON

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) The Parson Red Heads have played enough shows in town that it shouldn't come as a shock that they finally left Los Angeles for good, relocating to Portland this past summer. Perhaps the band (born in Eugene before moving to La La land) will bring the sunny weather with them. They definitely bring with them the sounds of Southern California (pre-Governator and budget woes, of course) to our gray skyline, finding a happy medium between the breezy country of the Byrds and the spiky power pop of the Nerves. The Red Heads—which can range in size from five to 15, occasionally dressed all in white—are already making themselves at home, playing loads of shows in the coming months, including an upcoming residency at Laurelthirst in November. I have a feeling they'll do just fine here. MARK LORE

ANCIENT AGE, GIT SOME

(East End, 203 SE Grand) Tonight's lineup has too much energy for its own damn good. Ancient Age features both current and former members of Portals and Last of the Juanitas, and delivers heavy, gruff riffage that is akin to Red Fang (another band they cross pollinate with), but the Ancient Age sound has a bit more gallop and crunch to it. The Denver-based Git Some is made up of current and ex-members of Planes Mistaken for Stars and Kingdom of Magic, and their role is to supply heaviness to the bill, as their music sounds like it's been rolled in the gutter—rock and roll with a greasy punk film smeared all over it. Frontman Lucius Fairchild belts out his vocals like a wide-eyed street preacher standing on a soapbox, and his panicked energy will surely translate to the live setting. ARIS WALES

FRIDAY 10/1

GRAND OPENING: MAXX BASS, DJ ERIC, MUSIQUE PLASTIQUE, REV SHINES, VINYL RITCHIE, PATRICK D, DJ FLIGHT RISK

(Clinton Street Record and Stereo, 2510 SE Clinton) Record geeks rejoice, for there is a new store in town. Settling in nicely in the old Q Is for Choir digs, Clinton Street Record and Stereo shop is slinging everything from vinyl, stereos, to reassembled old-school headphones for audiophiles everywhere. In honor of opening their doors, the shop is throwing an all-day party open to the public. The turntables will be occupied by some of Portland's finest DJs plus there will be free refreshments and cookies as well. Just keep those nougat-covered paws off the merchandise, okay? EZRA ACE CARAEFF

REDCOAT TURNCOAT, HELLO CONSTABLE, BUZZYSHYFACE, TIGER HOUSE

(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) I don't know if Redcoat Turncoat's debut CD How Do You Feel About Long Goodbyes? is actually a concept album about a bunny rabbit and its hunter, but I like to think that it is. The gently strummy "The Ballad of Baby Bunny"—with its muttered, Kurt Wagner-ish vocals—obviously fits the plot, and the ominous "The Collector," with its slashing chorus of "I'm gonna hunt you down" (voiced by Kusikia's Nsayi Matingo), sounds like it's sung with rifle in hand. Elsewhere, there's Kinks-y pop tunes, meandering guitar ballads, and a 12-minute epic in the form of the shoegazey "OK." It's a weird and charming record, with all the different pieces fitting together like a hodgepodge, and its best moments are the simplest ones that fit into the overall theme. It's almost like a sloppier, homegrown version of the Magnetic Fields' highbrow tunesmithing, and it leads directly to the very important question: Well, what do these guys sound like live? Tonight's the perfect opportunity to find out. NL

FIRST AID KIT, FERRABY LIONHEART, THE SEA OF CORTEZ

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Just stop it already, Sweden. You won. American music has cried uncle—we can't possibly compete with your Robyn, Jens Lekman, Sally Shapiro, Lykke Li, the Knife, the Tallest Man on Earth, etc. You win and we lose. First Aid Kit are the latest Nordic exports to plant the blue and yellow flag in our defeated soil with a tender folk sound created by doe-eyed sisters Klara and Johanna Söderberg. The teenage siblings pick up where early Azure Ray left off, creating vocal-heavy song structures that swell throughout their debut, The Big Black and the Blue—an album title that best describes our battered domestic pop scene. EAC

THE LOVE LOUNGERS, THE OCEAN FLOOR, THE FIRS OF PREY, YEAH GREAT FINE

(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) The Love Loungers are Portland's self-proclaimed "Rat Pack," a collective of half a dozen musicians who describe themselves as "sharp-dressing 20-somethings" that hearken back to an era when music was made to make you get down. Featuring a brass section and a backup singer to Ini Akpan's jive-talking lead vocals, the Loungers build upon classic soul sounds with a funky brand of lounge they call "groove-hop," plus there is just a tinge of contemporary hiphop influence audible as well. Joining a trend among local bands—think Sallie Ford or the Builders and the Butchers in their respective ways—the band largely rejects modern tendencies in favor of the soulful, group dynamics of yesteryear. Luckily, there seem to be plenty of Portlanders that want to join them in this aesthetic time travel. MARANDA BISH

CALVIN JOHNSON, BURNING YELLOWS, THE SANDWITCHES, ORCA TEAM, KELLY SLUSHER

(Templeton Building, 5 SE 3rd) There will be no more music in the Templeton Building. Or maybe there will be. In what is being billed as kinda, sorta, maybe-ish the final night for music in the woefully underused Eastside warehouse that snuggles up with the Burnside Bridge, former tenants Disjecta are hosting a mighty "farewell." You don't need a shield around a K tattooed to your wrist to adore the enigmatic Calvin Johnson, nor do you need to hang 10 to appreciate the shimmy and shake of the revisionist surf rockers in Orca Team. But above all, don't miss a moment of San Francisco's the Sandwitches, a trio best described by someone with a greater gift for words than myself as "a holy communion of Roky Erickson and Stevie Nicks." EAC

DUNGEN, THE ENTRANCE BAND

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Now six full-lengths and over a decade into their run—perhaps snatching the best Swedish rock band crown from Europe (the band) along the way—there's still no less scorch and squeal in Stockholm prog-psych outfit Dungen's lead guitar licks. Granted, they're lurking behind softer touches more often than in the past, but the rabbit-holes Skit I Allt pulls you through are ornamented with jazzy interludes as well as baroque piano, flute, clarinet and the occasional female vocal. At its mellowest, the record grooves and swirls like a Scandinavian Sea and Cake with more wah-wah in the mix. When the guitars let rip though, as on "Brallor" or the album's title track, "Skit I Allt"—the phrase is Swedish for "fuck it all"—Dungen capture the paisley-patterned hooks and magic of its breakthrough Ta Det Lugnt and express them through refined compositional chops. ETHAN JAYNE

GLASS CANDY, CHROMATICS, VICE DEVICE, MIKE SIMONETTI

(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) Do Italians still Do It Better? In 2007, the niche Italo disco revivalist imprint (a brainchild of Troubleman Unlimited founder Mike Simonetti) was widely lionized, with its After Dark comp, Chromatics' Night Drive, and Glass Candy's B/E/A/T/B/O/X all riding a wave of newfound love for the genre. The timing of Chromatics' "comeback" seems ill-conceived—with three year's worth of evolved electronic strains (chiptune, dubstep, chillwave) currently crowding the stage—but the band has a new double LP of dusky old-school synthpop on the way, and Johnny Jewel has been keeping busy as a solo artist and in the band Desire with Megan Louise. Strange timing for an Italo-disco re-revival? Perhaps, but to borrow a phrase from genre forefathers Black Devil Disco Club, "Timing, Forget the Timing." JASON BAXTER

SATURDAY 10/2

FREE GEEK'S 10-YEAR ANNIVERSARY: DAT'R , THE BEAUTY , DJ TED THIEMAN

(Bossanova Ballroom, 722 E Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

OLD LIGHT, MIKE COYKENDALL, MEYERCORD

(The Woods, 6637 SE Milwaukie) Read our article on Old Light.

UNIVERSAL STUDIOS FL, BACK TO THE FUTURE THE RIDE, GHOST ANIMAL

(Dunes, 1909 NE MLK) Based on their names alone, it would seem there were no two bands destined to join forces more than Seattle's Universal Studios Florida and Back to the Future the Ride from Los Angeles. Consider it an added bonus that their tunes are the perfect complement to each other as well—both projects channel a broad spectrum of electronic music to spout layered, halcyon waves of drone, reverb and nü-new-age ambient textures. While USF's incandescent ebbing and flowing will cause a few more heads to nod, BTTFTR wins points for originality in triggering his compositions' sounds. The solo explorations of Foot Village's Brian Miller, BTTFTR leaves the DeLorean in park and time-travels using a souped-up, thrift store-purchased plastic guitar instead—sort of like watching someone shred Bill Laswell on Guitar Hero. It's as awesome as it sounds. EJ

SUNDAY 10/3

JAMIE LIDELL, ZEUS

(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE 39th) See My, What a Busy Week!

THE SWORD, KARMA TO BURN, MOUNT CARMEL

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) See My, What a Busy Week!

RAVEN, WILD DOGS

(Peter's Room at the Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Read our article on Raven.

HOSANNAS, AAN, DANA BUOY

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) It was a bit of a surprise to hear that Hosannas halved their ranks earlier this year; Richard and Brandon Laws had just hit their stride as a four-piece with keyboardist Christof Hendrickson and drummer Lane Barrington, changing their name from Church, releasing the splendid Song Force Crystal full-length, and taking command of a flawless and powerful live show. Now after an amicable departure from Hendrickson and Barrington, Hosannas is down to the two Laws brothers, although their latest record Together features all four. It will be interesting to see what happens to Hosannas as a duo—Together is further evidence of their fragmented approach to songwriting, resulting in fascinating and utterly unique space lullabies. It will also be interesting to see where Hendrickson ends up; helming a collection of vintage synthesizers, he crafts some of the best keyboard parts in town. NL

THE DRUMS, SURFER BLOOD

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) It makes sense that Brooklyn band the Drums' self-titled debut opens with breathy moaning and lyrics about waiting on "the hood of your car"—sighing recline and wistful longing seem to be the band's most natural positions. That sampled breath and drum beat are like some wimped-up idea of Elastica's "Car Song," while the next two tracks have the kind of down-stroked guitars, slight melodic lines, and metronomic-yet-propulsive drums that typified the Strokes' streamlined approach to rock rhythm. These are all front-loaded red herrings, though, as the album soon settles down into hand clapping, classicist dream pop, and fey 1950s doo-wop, submerging playground jump-rope cadences ("Let's Go Surfing") and Beach Boys choruses (the mopey "fun fun fun" of "I Need Fun in My Life") in lightly reverbed melancholy, all swooning guitars and affected British accents and the kind of fainting pleas that Morrissey has made his life's work (although without Moz's occasional snarl). For boys who feel the pains of being soft at heart. ERIC GRANDY

MONDAY 10/4

THE BLACK KEYS, NICOLE ATKINS

(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) The Black Keys singer/guitar player Dan Auerbach denies that he sold his soul to Satan, à la Delta bluesman Robert Johnson. But I don't know. The Black Keys' Ohio-born, lightning-blues, two-man rock sound is so potent and spellbinding that something must be going on. Maybe Auerbach is just renting Satan his soul with an option to buy. Or maybe it's just the power and hypnotizing momentum of a band at its peak. With the release of their sixth studio album, Brothers, peaking is exactly what Auerbach and drummer/producer Patrick Carney are doing. They've never sounded better, performed better, or had better presence. Now is the time to see the Black Keys. But you might want to wear a garlic necklace, or bring a chicken gizzard, whatever you use to ward off the devil—he might be sniffing around the club, looking to complete a sale TRENT MOORMAN

TUESDAY 10/5

THE FELICE BROTHERS, ADAM HAWORTH STEPHENS

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

CARIBOU, EMERALDS

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) See My, What a Busy Week!

THE CLEAN, QUASI, THEO ANGELL WITH HAMISH KILGOUR AND ILYAS AHMED, DJ SIMMONS, DJ FRANK SUMATRA

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Read our article on the Clean.

THE BLACK KEYS, NICOLE ATKINS

(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) See Monday's listing.

LAND OF TALK, THE BESNARD LAKES, SUUNS

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) The three Canadian bands on tonight's bill prove that Montreal is, as ever, one of the undisputed capitals of rock. There's Land of Talk, whose capable and generous pop anthems are not too different from those of fellow Canucks Broken Social Scene or Stars. Then there's the Besnard Lakes, the mighty diplodocus of indie rock, whose studio concoctions bubble over like mad scientist experiments, and whose live shows deal out huge, beefily thumping slabs of rawk. Finally, there's newish band Suuns, whose debut EP and LP (both called Zeroes) are swirling, kaleidoscopic chasms of psychedelic rock butting up against off-kilter dance music. Recorded by the Besnard Lakes' Jace Lasek, their music is flannelly and uncool in all the best ways, with jagged squeals and rapid-fire dancepunk deconstructions sitting alongside passages of vacuum-suck quiet and heartbeat murmurs. Suuns are slightly terrifying, steadfastly forward thinking, and utterly musical. NL

NYMPH

(Valentine's, 232 SW Ankeny) The press release for Nymph's self-titled album name-checked so many of my favorite musicians (This Heat, 13th Floor Elevators, Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Steve Reich, Erkin Koray, John Coltrane, Can, etc.), it seemed impossible not to love the shit out of it. And while it doesn't quite match the immortal heights of those artists' best work, Nymph is a supremely exciting release. These four Brooklynites harness a powerful centrifugal force in their psych-rock/noise-jazz fusions that is indeed This Heat–like, and Kirk's rococo, reedy trills rear their freaky heads here and there. Nymph vocalist Eri Shoji scatters urgent scats over the tumultuous din and the sparse, suspenseful passages like a jittery Yoko Ono, and Matty McDermott picks out some complexly pungent, Koray-esque guitar motifs. "Namu," the album's 22-minute finale, possesses the sort of phenomenal instrumental freakinetics that used to conclude classic '70s krautrock LPs. Maybe that record-label hype is justified after all... DAVE SEGAL

WEDNESDAY 10/6

SYSTEM AND STATION, SUNDERLAND, THE EX-GIRLFRIENDS CLUB, ONE HOUR NEWPORT, BLIND LOVEJOY

(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE 39th) In a town with a bevy of overlooked talent, few bands can approach the criminally underappreciated System and Station. Over the course of eight releases—full-length number five being the just-released A Series of Screws—the local trio has been churning out epic rock recordings, each more ambitious than its predecessor. Consult medical assistance if the prodigious hooks in songs like "Pardon Me" and "Thieves" don't linger with you for days. Once again recorded by Larry Crane, A Series of Screws builds upon complex guitar structures that would fit quite nicely in my late-'90s dream bill: Burning Airlines, No Knife, and (Clarity-era) Jimmy Eat World. I might have to change my sheets just thinking about that. EAC

ACOUSTIC MINDS, GO FEVER, AND AND AND, SEARCH PARTY

(Someday Lounge, 125 NW 5th) Do you want Oregon's future to be a wasteland of dirty air, dirtier water, and countless other environment nightmares (perhaps a floating Walmart built on a privatized Crater Lake)? Then get off your backside and show some support for the Oregon League of Conservation Voters, who'll make sure our elected officials protect Oregon's environment while in office. With an election around the corner, the OLCV is raising funds with a diverse balance of local bands, including the lovably sloppy And And And. Not since the earliest days of Modest Mouse has there been a band that could get away with such haphazard yet utterly creative song arrangements. If you skip this show, get ready for the future to be summed up in three terrifying words: Drill, baby, drill. EAC