TARTUFI Rontoms, 4/3

THURSDAY 3/31

TALIB KWELI, FASHAWN, ANIMAL FARM, T&E

(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

SEASICK STEVE

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Seasick Steve is your average sixtysomething former carnie/farmhand/hobo turned globally acclaimed blues musician that just so happens to be huge in the UK and who only recently inked a record deal with Jack White. Yawn. In all seriousness, Seasick Steve is one of those rare musical anomalies that is easy to root for—even if his music veers toward gimmicky at times—as he barks and yammers with a sandpapered yelp and hammers away at a series of instruments that look like they belong in, or were rescued from, the trash heap. His Third Man Records debut will be out later this year and success on this side of the pond is likely to follow. If not, he can always go back to being a carnie. EZRA ACE CARAEFF

HELMET, SAINT VITUS, CROWBAR, KYLESA, RED FANG, HOWL, THE ATLAS MOTH

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Why do some metal shows have to be a six-hour endurance contest? By the time you get to the headliners your neck is jelly, you're deaf, and you can barely stand anymore. This juggernaut of a bill features seven bands with girthy sonic endowments, to say the least. Crowbar has the hardcore sludge, Saint Vitus brings the classic crawling doom-and-roll, and Helmet's Meantime in its entirety will no doubt be a treat. And that's just the old guard. Do yourself a favor, take a pre-show nap, carb up, and come early to see the new kids on the block: Red Fang, Howl, Kylesa, and the Atlas Moth. Someday the dinosaurs will be extinct, and this next generation will be all that's left. ARIS WALES Also see My, What a Busy Week!

O'DEATH, HELADO NEGRO, LEE COREY OSWALD

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) The twisted folk and bluegrass sound of O'Death was an odd fit for a Manhattan-based band—insert joke about them living on Avenue A(ppalachia) here—but it worked wonders on their debut long-player, Head Home. By 2009 the band had picked up steam; that is, until drummer David Rogers-Berry was diagnosed with osteosarcoma (a cancerous bone tumor that has the word "coma" in its name—worst disease ever!) during the middle of a tour. As he underwent chemo, O'Death shuttered for a year, returning only now with the captivating Outside. Frontman Greg Jamie has grown more vocally confident along the way, barking out songs like Isaac Brock (in Ugly Casanova) only to quickly return to a hushed whisper, which only further entrenches the band's backwoods haunt. EAC

PEGASUS DREAM, RYAT, CC SWIM, NUCULAR AMINALS

(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) Philadelphia electronic musician Christina McGeehan recently joined forces with guitarist/multi-instrumentalist Tim Conley, expanding her Ryat project to a duo. The two retreated to the Catskills last summer and came back with Avant Gold, a fizzy, fuzzy record that flirts with club beats, glitch, heavy bass, and unrestrained weirdness. Pop songs are turned on their ear, like the warped piano ballad "We Walk Slow, But as Fast as Their Rush," and the addictive dance floor curveball "Superficial Friction," while the thumping "In Your Face" carefully reveals its majestic, hard-earned beauty. April 12 will see the release of Avant Gold Remixed, which includes a remix by Portland's own White Rainbow. In the meantime, Ryat has been bringing their adventurous live show to both coasts, incorporating a light show from VJ Annapurna Kumar and sometimes featuring a Flying Lotus cover. NED LANNAMANN

BOATS, HOT PANDA, THE FOUR EDGE

(The Woods, 6637 SE Milwaukie) One listen to Hot Panda's "Mindlessnesslessness" will leave you scratching your head and asking yourself, "What the fuck is going on here?" It sounds like two songs smashed together, with frayed guitars and vocals whipping around a brick-heavy bassline and an assortment of other noises. (Is that a calliope I hear?) It's a great tune, although it would be premature to make an assessment of this four-piece based on this one song. These Canucks are all over the map; in fact, my only gripe is that their latest LP How Come I'm Dead? is often a little too jarring—a Pixies crib here, a Nick Cave/spaghetti-western nod there, plus their forays into electronic music. From what I've seen of Hot Panda's live show, their schizoid tendencies work—you may discover just what the fuck is going on after all. MARK LORE

FRANZ NICOLAY, DAVID DONDERO, BARTON CARROLL

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) The largely acoustic new album from David Dondero, A Pre-Existing Condition, is mostly made up of covers, including Little Feat's "Willin'," Doug Sahm's "(Is Anybody Going to) San Antone," and Elizabeth Cotten's "Freight Train." Judging by those selections, Dondero is still playing the role of seasoned traveler, a road warrior far from settling down anytime soon. A Pre-Existing Condition may also be a pause for breath for Dondero, whose brutally honest songs have populated a string of albums since 1999, including last year's weary # Zero with a Bullet. Perhaps this time around he was content to let the words of others do the suffering for him. Dondero opens for the famous mustache of former Hold Steady keyboardist Franz Nicolay, whose new album Luck and Courage is a collection of gentle, banjo-plucked country-folk tunes. NL

FRIDAY 4/1

MY CHEMICAL ROMANCE, NEON TREES, THE ARCHITECTS

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Read about My Chemical Romance.

WOW AND FLUTTER, VIRGIN ISLANDS, CAFETERIA DANCE FEVER

(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) More than a year after the skull-busting, hip-jerking sons-of-a-gun in the post-mod-punk group Virgin Islands released their debut EP The Age of Anxiety, the band completed their debut full-length Ernie Chambers v. God, to be released later this spring on New York label the Control Group. The straight-ahead, meat-and-potatoes rock of Virgin Islands is rife with angular and cohesive rhythmic dynamics, pitted against former Cops leader Mike Jaworski's tense political and personal vocal convictions. It's fitting that the band pays tribute to the former Nebraska state senator who sued God and was considered by some to be "the angriest man in Nebraska" (where Jaworski was born and raised). The music is angry, passionate, and speaks on behalf of a nation ready to hear something that hasn't already been said. God better have a good defense. TRAVIS RITTER

DOM, HEAVY HAWAII, JEFFREY JERUSALEM, DJ COPY, NEW DADZ

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) On their debut EP Sun Bronzed Greek Gods, Massachusetts lo-fi pop band Dom has gotten a lot of things right: the carefree desire for cheap thrills in "Jesus," the heavy-reverb patina sitting over the garage jangle of "Bochicha," and the effervescent '80s synths that shimmer in "Burn Bridges." That last song was reinterpreted in a great acoustic version up now on Bandcamp, further proof that the framework of Dom's songs is sturdy, not just the result of some lucky fucking around in the bedroom. Bands this young can flame out over early praise, especially before a full-length has even been announced, but Dom seems to have the necessary ingredients—i.e., good songs—to be in for the long haul. NL

AND AND AND, THE WOOLEN MEN, THE BLAST MAJESTY

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Is it wrong that I want to grab And And And by their collective shoulders and shake them violently until they get their shit together? It is? Okay, sorry. Regardless, And And And very well might be Portland's finest upcoming band, but they are also this city's most frustrating act, one who has yet to properly live up to their unbridled potential. In lieu of delivering a (produced and properly edited) full-length follow-up to last year's wonderful, if lopsided, A Fresh Summer with And And And LP, the band has instead given us Life Ruiner, a conceptual cassette split with Woolen Men on the Apes Tapes label. Like anything from Andx3, the great moments of mumbling off-kilter indie rock (like Malkmus on a Robitussin bender) are spectacular, but there are plenty of expendable songs throughout the release. A new full-length, in a studio, with a producer—that is my request for the band. If not, someone's going to get a good shaking. EAC

SALEM, DANGEROUS BOYS CLUB, THE SOFT MOON, VICE DEVICE, DJ NIGHTSCHOOL

(Branx, 320 SE 2nd) Let's forget for a minute that 2010 ever existed and that the genre "grave wave" was ever coined. Bands that were once considered goth, with dour synth treatments and tones and cryptic morbid imagery, now fall into a category in line with industrial, EBM, and post-punk. Captured Tracks' latest release from San Francisco's the Soft Moon instills a hollow, isolated, synth-heavy sound that runs through a murky mess of reverb and noise. It works perfectly with Portland goth crooners Dangerous Boys Club and Salem's brand of "witch house." This bill will have you transported back to some hedonistic batcave circa 1985. Alien sex fiends, take note. TR

SATURDAY 4/2

WEINLAND, QUIET LIFE, RAVENNA WOODS, MBILLY

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

BEATS ANTIQUE, ESKMO

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) If you're looking for authenticity, you won't find it in Beats Antique. The Bay Area trio's world-music tapestry mostly tumbles out of a laptop equipped with Ableton, and all that striking Mediterranean, Balkan, and Middle Eastern instrumentation gets boiled in with pedestrian elements of reggae, hiphop, and breakbeat, resulting in a jumbled smorgasbord of world music opportunism. But if the music doesn't stand on its own two legs, the live show is something of a spectacle, highlighted by bellydancing from Zoe Jakes of the Bellydance Superstars, the troupe managed by IRS Records magnate (and former Police manager) Miles Copeland. If anything, Beats Antique are one of many clear signs that Burning Man esotericism has fire-danced its way into mainstream culture. NL

PEELANDER-Z, ANAMANAGUCHI, LEE COREY OSWALD, GIRLFRIENDS

(Someday Lounge, 125 NW 5th) Attention, teenage stoner of stashboxes past: Brooklyn's Anamanaguchi has accomplished one of your very first pipe dreams, having recently scored a videogame (Ubisoft's Scott Pilgrim vs. the World, to be precise) with their frenetic, instrumental chiptune punk. Plus, they have a band member who plays a Game Boy in addition to guitar, and have apparently hacked a NES game console that is utilized as a synthesizer. And while all that may sound fun—though perhaps too kitschy to be truly listenable—one run through their 2009 debut, Dawn Metropolis, or the recently released Airbrushed 7-inch, will infuse you with enough energy to gobble up all of the coins, defeat the dragon, and proceed to the bonus level. It's not all square and triangle waves; in addition to being super techno-nerds, they're a bona fide four-piece rock band. Mario Bros. coveralls not discouraged. RAQUEL NASSER

SUNDAY 4/3

LENKA, GREG LASWELL, CRISTINA CANO

(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE 39th) See My, What a Busy Week!

BURNING YELLOWS, HORNET LEG, FOREVER

(Tonic Lounge, 3100 NE Sandy) You might not have noticed, but the cavernous Tonic Lounge recently started booking some great established and up-and-coming acts from around Portland and the Northwest, bringing them all together for a showcase every single Sunday. Tonight's showcase features the infernal Burning Yellows, whose poncho-clad frontman Zach King and wife Kyja King make morose, minimalist post-punk, as well as the technically stunning, always morphing pop-curio-art-craft sounds of Hornet Leg, and Forever's post-punk maelstrom. It's so much easier to hit the snooze button on Monday morning when your head is still rattling from the night before. TR

BRITISH SEA POWER, A CLASSIC EDUCATION

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) This thinking fellers' union from Brighton, England, has made a decent go of mixing post-punk and new wave with its own eccentricities (like writing a modern soundtrack to a 1934 cult documentary on Irish fishermen). The results have been mixed (see above), but credit should be given to British Sea Power for tweaking their sound in adventurous new ways. The band's latest opus, Valhalla Dancehall, balances all of their traits, right down to the oxymoronic title. Wall-of-sound guitars will likely be the centerpiece of British Sea Power's live show (along with sweaty band members and dry wit)—of course, I wouldn't hold these lads to it. ML

TARTUFI, FIST FITE

(Rontoms, 600 E Burnside) San Francisco duo Tarfufi make enormous music, a detonative sound that's fiercely progressive. Their latest release, The Goodwill of the Scar, consists of a single, 26-minute track (which, incidentally, is not called "The Goodwill of the Scar" but rather "The Butterless Man") that flows dynamically through several different movements. The band began in 2001 as a power-pop group, but somewhere along the way they—not unlike Liars—shed any conventional pop aspects to fully embrace experimentalism. They've recorded with the Fucking Champs' Tim Green and started a Bay Area rock school for kids age four through seven, called Rock Band Land. In the meantime, they're performing The Goodwill of the Scar/"The Butterless Man" in its entirety on this tour, which means that the live show will embrace fiery rock and passages of serene beauty, all backed by Tartufi's impressive musicianship. NL

MONDAY 4/4

RON SEXSMITH, CAITLIN ROSE

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read about Caitlin Rose.

TUESDAY 4/5

THE DODOS, READING RAINBOW

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read about the Dodos.

LIKE A VILLAIN, FORT KING, RUTHANN FRIEDMAN, PURRBOT

(Ella Street Social Club, 714 SW 20th Pl) Ruthann Friedman wrote the 1967 smash "Windy" for the Association, which ranks as one of the most beguiling, instantly catchy songs of the '60s. But she moved in stranger circles in LA during those heady times, cutting a single with Van Dyke Parks, hanging out with Frank Zappa, Country Joe, and Janis Joplin, and rejecting an offer to join Jefferson Airplane. Her 1971 LP, Constant Companion (reissued by Water in 2006), reveals Friedman as a composer of exquisitely lovely, spare folk-pop and a singer with a beautifully burnished tone somewhere between Dorothy Moskowitz and Astrud Gilberto. If you care at all about gorgeous, folk-jazz-inflected songcraft, you should check out one of the best who never really received her due (though she's surely dining well on those "Windy" royalties). DAVE SEGAL

WEDNESDAY 4/6

HOUSE OF SOUND FUNDRAISER: THEE HEADLINERS, THE NEEDFUL LONGINGS, WELCOME HOME WALKER, DJ HWY 7, DJ INSTANT ONION

(Fez Ballroom, 318 SW 11th) See My, What a Busy Week!

DANIELSON, OLD LIGHT, 1939 ENSEMBLE

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) There was a brief window of time when it appeared that Brother Danielson would cling to the ascent of pal Sufjan Stevens (much like one would to the cape of the illegally drawn Superman that adorns the original cover of Illinois) and vault himself from the Christian folk fringes to the less-forgiving glare of the mainstream. In retrospect, that is a ridiculous expectation to have for a man who often wears a gigantic tree outfit onstage. Daniel Smith & Co. have always sounded best tucked away in the corners, never having to answer for their fascinating/frustrating catalog of uneven recordings (or to have to field questions about where the other 48 state-themed albums are). Best of Gloucester County is Danielson's absolutely epic new long-player, a slimmed-down glimpse at an artist whose best work comes on his own terms. I still don't get the tree outfit, though. EAC