BASIA BULAT
The Woods, 6/2

THURSDAY 6/2

PDX POP NOW! COMP RELEASE: O BRUXO, BLUE SKIES FOR BLACK HEARTS, SWAHILI, LOST LANDER, DJ PAPI, DJ GIGANTE
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

PBR & END HITS PRESENT: SALUTE TO THE '70S: JIM BRUNBERG, MIKE COYKENDALL, AND AND AND, ARCHERS, & MORE
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) It works a little something like this: Ten of the finest bands to call Portland their home are assigned a single year from the glorious decade that was the 1970s. Then each band painstakingly selects three songs from that year to cover. You will hear talented groups—including a few that have formed exclusively for this show—tackle everything from the rock and roll jailbreak of Thin Lizzy to the bubbling homoerotic tension of Hall & Oates, plus covers of Rush, Nick Lowe, the Ramones, and plenty of other surprises as well. Past cover nights have never failed to reach capacity, so show up early for this free—yes, free—show that you won't soon forget. EZRA ACE CARAEFF

STORNOWAY, SEA OF BEES
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) There's a choirboy element in the voice of Stornoway singer Brian Briggs, a purity that hasn't been presented this well in pop music since Colin Blunstone of the Zombies. That vocal clarity is what elevates the Oxford band above touchy-feely Britfolk peers like Mumford and Sons—that along with some splendid material, like "Zorbing," the opening track from their debut album Beachcomber's Windowsill. The record's weaker songs sound a little like James performing Tigermilk, not necessarily a bad thing. The band's been known to occasionally perform some tunes without the help of microphones, which in a room like the Doug Fir should be a real thrill if they decide to do it. Arrive in plenty of time to catch Sea of Bees (hey, bees!), the project of California singer/songwriter Jules Baenziger, who also has a vocal clarity beyond match. Hers is more of a sorrowful yowl, which gives her tremendous songs an emotional power that borders on devastation. NED LANNAMANN

BASIA BULAT, BRIGHT ARCHER, VIKESH KAPOOR
(The Woods, 6637 SE Milwaukie) When (typically male) music scribes talk about Basia Bulat the word "cute" is far too liberally employed. There is no denying that these (typically male) authors tend to use their pen to foster fanboy crushes, but this Canadian singer/songwriter deserves more than to be some pinup girl for lonely (typically male) writers. Bulat's pair of recordings for fabled indie imprint Rough Trade (2007's Oh, My Darling and last year's Heart of My Own) seem transparent enough on the surface—quaint folk numbers, wholesome lyrics about love, a healthy dose of autoharp, and a voice that can thaw the coldest of Ontario winters—but they waste little time revealing an artist of deep complexity and artistic vision. For Bulat, there is more to life than mere cuteness alone. EAC

FRIDAY 6/3

HOLOCENE'S EIGHTH ANNIVERSARY: THE MIRACLES CLUB, GUIDANCE COUNSELOR, BLOUSE, PURPLE N GREEN, & MORE
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

TENDER LOVING EMPIRE FOURTH ANNIVERSARY: JARED MEES & THE GROWN CHILDREN, TYPHOON, Y LA BAMBA, & MORE
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) See My, What a Busy Week!

SALLIE FORD & THE SOUND OUTSIDE, QUIET LIFE, WHAT HEARTS
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Sallie Ford.

GRUFF RHYS, Y NIWL, THE OCEAN FLOOR
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Gruff Rhys leads Super Furry Animals, a Welsh psych-rock band that's somewhere between Gorky's Zygotic Mynci and Dungen—meaning, they could swerve from skipping-through-a-meadow whimsy to stormy weirdness at a moment's notice. Also, not unlike the Beta Band, SFA have shown periodic proclivities toward electronic experimentation over their nine albums. On his own, Rhys has released three full-lengths. His latest, Hotel Shampoo, proves that his ability to write skewed yet pulchritudinous melodies hasn't run dry. Welsh tourmates Y Niwl play vocal-free surf rock with tight arrangements, immediate hooks, and punchy rhythms, in the reverent, revivalist vein of Shadowy Men on a Shadowy Planet. It's nothing new, of course, but Y Niwl do it with verve. DAVE SEGAL

DRUNK DAD, FUGUE, AXXICORN
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) With a constantly expanding following of loyal headbangers, Drunk Dad are a hardcore band that was birthed in the fertile Northeast Portland house show scene. They have been blowing away audiences with fast, heavy, and deafeningly loud sets in basements, living rooms, and the occasional club, and despite the chaos their audiences leave in their wake, the trio of Adam Garcia, Dane Herrin, and Emmett Riddels are able to keep it together long enough to pound through a constantly evolving set. Heavy feedback ties together sparse chords before it erupts into a genre-defying take on hardcore. The fact that Drunk Dad has gained respect in a scene not ideally suited for them proves that they are a band to watch out for. ARIAN JALALI

SATURDAY 6/4

BRUNO MARS, JANELLE MONÁE, MAYER HAWTHORNE & THE COUNTY
(Rose Garden, 1 Center Ct) See My, What a Busy Week!

ANDAZ: BLACKMAHAL, DJ ANJALI, THE INCREDIBLE KID
(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) See My, What a Busy Week!

SALLIE FORD & THE SOUND OUTSIDE, PANCAKE BREAKFAST, BASEMINT
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Sallie Ford

ALELA DIANE, THE PARSON RED HEADS, LINDSAY CLARK
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our article on Alela Diane.

VARIOUS: RYAN ORGAN, MONKEYTEK, JON AD, IAN OBE, FOLDING
(Branx, 320 SE 2nd) After nearly five years of rumbling dance floors, Various is taking a break. The monthly event started at a time when dubstep was emerging as an exciting, new genre and resident DJs Ryan Organ, Monkeytek, and Jon AD are largely responsible for introducing the sound to Portland. Even as dubstep popularized at a rapid speed and other nights focusing on the bass-driven music popped up around town, Various easily stood out as the most legitimate option. The residents have consistently curated the finest bass tracks, while filtering out all of the horrible sounds that invaded the genre, and hauled in a literal truckload of subwoofers each month so the music could be experienced in proper fashion. There's not a whole lot of fanfare tonight, and I'd like to hope that means this break really is just a brief hiatus and a new chapter of Various is coming soon. Either way, it's the end of an era and a celebration is in order. AVA HEGEDUS

MUSIC FROM WINTER'S BONE: MARIDETH SISCO, DENNIS CRIDER, BO BROWN, VAN COLBERT, TEDI MAY, LINDA STOFFEI
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Last year's Winter's Bone was one of the best films in recent memory; hobbled together for a scant $2 million, director Debra Granik's jaw-clenchingly harrowing drama follows 17-year-old Ree (Jennifer Lawrence) as she desperately searches for her missing father in the brutal, hardscrabble landscape of the methed-out Ozarks. A big reason why Winter's Bone works as well as it does is its music—like grim, stripped-down bluegrass, the traditional and original old-time tunes that float and twist through the film feel ancient and haunting. Like a hillbilly Justice League, the musicians behind the excellent soundtrack—known collectively as Blackberry Winter, and immediately recognizable by the rich, weary voice of folk singer and storyteller Marideth Sisco—have united for a nationwide tour. They hit Portland this week to deliver the sort of authentic performance one rarely gets a chance to see outside of Appalachia. Go, steel yourself beforehand for melancholy and beauty in equal measure. ERIK HENRIKSEN

ONRY OZZBORN, IAME, CLOUDY OCTOBER, HIVES INQUIRY SQUAD, VOID PEDAL
(Mt. Tabor Theater Lounge, 4811 SE Hawthorne) Don't be fooled by the title of Portland emcee IAME's latest full-length, Lame. The album's name is a nod to clueless promoters misspelling the emcee's name, as well as a thematic jump-off to address some of the more shallow aspects of hiphop culture. As a member of both the Oldominion and Sandpeople crews, in addition to having multiple solo releases already under his belt, IAME is not only one of the most prolific emcees in the region, but also one of the most slept on. Hopefully Lame, his most cohesive and mature solo effort to date, changes that. The lyricism is top shelf, a wry indictment of selfish materialism filtered through humor and wisdom that deftly avoids anything approaching preachy. Flooded with the tightest of similes, sagacious pop-culture references, and multiple "Yo, rewind that" turns of phrase, the end result is both cerebral and staggering.  RYAN FEIGH

ARCHITECTURE IN HELSINKI, HOORAY FOR EARTH
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Architecture in Helsinki bring you shiny-happy-people music from Australia, not the hoped-for grim, abstract soundscapes from Finland that their name portends. 'Tis a pity, but the Down Under quintet are adequate at what they do—primary-colored dance pop for life's lighter moments. The use of glockenspiel, sax, clarinet, recorder, tuba, trombone, trumpet, and analog synths lends AIH's music an orchestral luxuriousness that separates them from most of their peers. New York City's Hooray for Earth write similarly densely layered, melodious songs that go for a cavernous, uplifting effect. Contentment ensues. DS

SUNDAY 6/5

THE LUMINEERS, LINCOLN'S BEARD
(Bar Bar, 3939 N Mississippi) See My, What a Busy Week!

SLOAN, DEARLY BELOVED
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) The longer Sloan is around, the harder they are to comprehend. The Canadian quartet is kind of a miraculous thing, really: All the members in the lineup—unchanged since day one—write and sing, they each shift their instruments between them like there's no tomorrow, and their records (10 albums in all) are dizzy stacks of verses and choruses all strung together into continuous suites like side two of Abbey Road. Now in their 20th year, the band is about as reliable as peanut butter. The new record, The Double Cross, has some pretty damn terrific power-pop songwriting, but it also has virtually nothing to do with what's going on in music right now. Rather, Sloan continues to hold a firm grip on their little fiefdom, where choruses are big and bold and brash, and the Cars' first album is gospel, and there's no need to reinvent something that ain't broke. It's a product, for sure, but Sloan makes a fine one. NL

MONDAY 6/6

FRIENDLY FIRES, WISE BLOOD
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

DALE EARNHARDT JR. JR., EMA
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) All apologies to the son of a mustachioed racecar hero who entered heaven through the wall at the Daytona 500, but the band Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr. are quite forgettable. Palatable and completely acceptable in the background, sure, but the Detroit duo's sound has little staying power and they'll likely be a distant memory by the time they get that cease and desist order from their namesake. Meanwhile, opener EMA is here for the long run. We've been breathlessly heralding Erika M. Anderson's Past Life Martyred Saints as an album-of-the-year frontrunner, a devastatingly personal and stylish recording of an artist coming into her own. While the newfound Portlander's vocals draw clumsily comparisons to Kim Gordon or PJ Harvey, there is a unique vulnerability to the music of EMA, an unmatched sound that won't stray from your memory (or turntable) anytime soon. EAC

WOODSMAN, TAPE DECK MOUNTAIN, HOSANNAS
(Someday Lounge, 125 NW 5th) From the first seconds of "Insects," the opening track on Woodsman's Rare Forms record, it's clear the Denver band is onto some dark magic. A heavy drumbeat that somehow both swings and sounds totally nailed to the floor, a repeating arpeggio that sounds pulled straight off Toto's "Africa," a thunderous guitar chord that reverberates fearsomely, an echoed shouted vocal that's more or less incomprehensible. From there, the rest of the record gets weirder, with sound experiments that juxtapose ambient noise against deliberately off-kilter playing. Woodsman is ferociously bizarre, and their sonic alchemy results in some truly unique sounds. This is the kind of anti-pop music that Animal Collective would still be making if they weren't so intent on playing to their ecstasy'ed-out, noodle-dancing fanbase. This is music that looks into the abyss. NL

THE DETROIT COBRAS, GIRL IN A COMA
(Dante's, 1 SW 3rd) There's something about Michigan that will forever capture my imagination: Motown, Alice Cooper, early punk rock, even its techno scene—all under the gritty backdrop of its blue-collar skyline. The Detroit Cobras (from you guessed it) are all about it, too—and they might be the best cover band around. For almost two decades, the Cobras' core members—Rachel Nagy and Mary Ramirez—have made a career out of interpreting, reinventing, and rocking the fuck out of obscure tunes found on dusty old 45s. While they pay homage to artists of all shapes and sizes from all over the globe (including Kingston's the Melodians), they keep it in the spirit of their namesake. So what if the Detroit Cobras are a cover band? They are more genuine than the thousands of other bands playing covers and passing them off as originals. MARK LORE

TUESDAY 6/7

Happy birthday, Tom Jones. My mom threw her panties at you in 1971. She would like them back now.

WEDNESDAY 6/8

OMAR SOULEYMAN, DJ GLOBALRUCKUS
(Dante's, 1 SW 3rd) See My, What a Busy Week! and Read our article on Omar Souleyman.

WOOLLY MAMMOTH COMES TO DINNER, OPERATIVE, GOLDEN RETRIEVER, ROB WALMART, FUTURE LEGEND DJS, BIRCH COOPER
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

MANCHESTER ORCHESTRA, CAGE THE ELEPHANT, SLEEPER AGENT
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) Read our article on Manchester Orchestra.

TIMBER TIMBRE, MARISSA NADLER
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Timber Timbre's Taylor Kirk has one of those voices that cut through the 21st century's folk-rock clutter. He's striving for an old-school sort of romantic timbre (ho), but his instrument's a bit too inelegant to pull it off. Nevertheless, Kirk's earnest stiltedness and forthright gravity lend his band's stripped-down yet lush music a kind of wounded grace. Timber Timbre's new album, Creep on Creepin' On, takes things down weirder paths, trudging at odd angles and radiating a subdued drama. Something about this Canadian trio seems to be just slightly off, like a bar band you'd see playing in a David Lynch film. Boston's Marissa Nadler imbues folk music with sheer swathes of dream-pop production techniques. Fans of Mazzy Star and Mojave 3 should swoon to her stately, diaphanously beautiful songs. DS