AESOP ROCK
Wonder Ballroom, 6/10

THURSDAY 6/9

BREATHE OWL BREATHE, KARL BLAU, JIB KIDDER
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See My, What a Busy Week!

ORANGE GOBLIN, GATES OF SLUMBER, NAAM
(Dante's, 1 SW 3rd) Read our article on Orange Goblin.

QUIET COUNTRIES, IOA, TEAM EVIL
(The Woods, 6637 SE Milwaukie) One-man band Quiet Countries is now a quartet. Leb Borgerson has enlisted three other musicians—bassist Gus Elg, keyboardist John Wagner, and drummer Scott Hayden—to bring his genre-defying compositions to live audiences. While the new Quiet Countries record, The Ancient Motorcade, is largely Borgerson on his own (it also features contributions from Elg, Laura Gibson, Point Juncture WA's Victor Nash, Portland Cello Project's Doug Jenkins, and others), it makes sense that Borgerson wants the backing of a full band to recreate these sounds in a live setting—the record's got more flesh and heartbeat than can be found in some of Quiet Countries' earlier work. It still encompasses the sounds of IDM and hiphop, but the focus of Motorcade is on Borgerson's songcraft, and the result is a richly textured, impressively diverse recording that's full of color, mood, and style. NED LANNAMANN

PHAROAHE MONCH, MY-G, LUCK-ONE
(Peter's Room at the Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Pharoahe Monch has always found critical success. Ever since the Queens emcee joined forces with partner Prince Po to create Organized Konfusion, through his latest solo effort, W.A.R. (We Are Renegades), Monch has left music critics scrambling for superlatives to describe his dizzying flow and thematic complexities. Failure to cross over into the mainstream is partially due to the lackluster promotional pull afforded to him, as well as Monch's refusal to dilute his dense multi-layered content. Too often, artistic trailblazers are only given their due after they're no longer around, when the public has had time to catch up to what they were putting down. Tonight is a chance to buck that trend and see a master at the top of his game. Opener Luck-One is similarly gifted—with his own brand of lyrical dexterity, sagacious subject matter, and a punishing live show. RYAN FEIGH

FRIDAY 6/10

PORTLAND MUTANT PARTY: CHEMICALS, LEADERS, THE MEAN JEANS, THERAPISTS, BILL COLLECTORS
(Branx, 320 SE 2nd) See My, What a Busy Week!

BUCK AND BOUNCE: BEYONDADOUBT, BRICE NICE
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

SQUID ATTACK!, PAPER BRAIN, BUTTER, GRANDFATHER
(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) Prepare for the most adorable story ever. As an eighth grader, Isaac Scott won a guitar in a charity auction and immediately started writing his own music. Soon he recruited a bassist named "Panda," and was booked for the school talent show, but young Isaac was still searching for a drummer. As it turns out, his drummer was sitting across from him at the dinner table—his father, Sid. A father/son band like Squid Attack! might appear to be a cheap gimmick that places novelty over quality, but there is something very real about the younger Scott's still-evolving skill as a frontman. With a weathered voice far beyond his years (inexplicably enough, he sounds like David Byrne), the band has hastily assembled a few recordings—the latest of which is released tonight—before Isaac leaves the nest for his freshman year at Evergreen College. While for obvious reasons I don't approve of the "Ezra is dead" chorus in "RRR," the gentle "Samana Clay" is a wondrous work of jangling rock precision and the epic "Grass House/The Moth" rewards listeners with an abrupt tempo shift at the song's halfway point. Isaac, have fun in college, but don't you dare put that guitar down anytime soon. EZRA ACE CARAEFF

STEVE EARLE AND THE DUKES
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) I promised myself I'd talk about Steve Earle's music. Not his Brando-esque physical transformation from completely boneable (have you seen the cover of Guitar Town lately?) to a weird creature with a combover that resides under a bridge. Nor shall I discuss his debut novel, I'll Never Get out of This World Alive, or his roles as Walon on The Wire and Harley Watt on Treme—nope, we're talking about the man's music. Currently making the rounds in support of I'll Never Get out of This World Alive—the album, not the book—Earle peppers his sets with a respectable balance of new and old, and is backed by his better half, singer/songwriter Allison Moorer. While the T Bone Burnett-produced I'll Never Get isn't his finest hour, it's a solid, balanced mix of protest rock ("Little Emperor") and sober ballads ("This City"). It's proof that there is still plenty left to say about the music of Steve Earle. EAC

BRENDAN PERRY, ROBIN GUTHRIE
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) England's 4AD label has inspired some of the most devout fans in the history of fandom. So the pairing on this tour of Dead Can Dance's Brendan Perry and Cocteau Twins' Robin Guthrie should make some sensitive hearts explode with glee. Blessed with a rich, deep voice of Sinatra-esque timbre, Perry guided Dead Can Dance through several elegant albums of musical archeology imbued with passionate goth romanticism and utmost gravity. He and partner Lisa Gerrard animated ancient musics from around the world with impeccable poise and skill. Guthrie turned Cocteau Twins into one of the most glorious exemplars of the "sonic cathedral" aesthetic; they took Phil Spector to church, and many worshiped at their stained-glass wall of sound. The Twins' high-trajectory shoegaze lullabies still sound awesome. Perry will likely play material from the recent album of dramatic, alabaster ballads, Ark, and Guthrie from his new collection of Emeralds, which renders the Cocteau Twins sound in quasi-new-age watercolors. DAVE SEGAL

AESOP ROCK, KIMYA DAWSON, ROB SONIC, DJ BIG WIZ
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Aesop Rock has shared the spotlight with many a notable name—the greatest of these was Vast Aire's cameo on "Nickel Plated Pockets"—and the rapid-fire emcee continues that tradition with Hail Mary Mallon, his recent collaboration with Rob Sonic and DJ Big Wiz. It's not a grand departure for the San Francisco (via New York) rapper; instead it's yet another contribution to his otherwise bulletproof discography (seriously, the man has yet to make a single poor recording). He'll be sharing a bill with MC Kimya Dawson (the oft-forgotten 10th member of the Wu-Tang Clan), an odd lineup that, if anything, proves that these two eclectic artists are cool with diversifying their surroundings a bit. Tonight quirky folkers and hiphop backpackers shall mingle as one. EAC

THE LORD WEIRD SLOUGH FEG, WITCH MOUNTAIN, CHRISTIAN MISTRESS, DARKBLACK
(Plan B, 1305 SE 8th) Remember the moment you discovered your dad was cool? You flipped through his record collection while he told you anecdotes about hiking Mount Hood on peyote, or the time he saw Vanilla Fudge, Blue Cheer, and Jimi Hendrix all at the same show. Well, tonight's lineup is the one you will tell your teenagers about. You'll spin your worn Christian Mistress Agony and Opium record and regale them with a tale of how you witnessed their heavy-metal majesty in the flesh. You'll point at your kid's vintage DarkBlack shirt and knowingly exclaim that their dual guitar harmonies and soaring vocals were much more amazing live. Their jaws may drop when you tell them how many times you saw Portland's doom-slinging mainstays Witch Mountain. And finally, when you describe Slough Feg as Thin Lizzy on steroids, they'll understand because (hopefully) they'll have already heard Bad Reputation. Don't you want to see that look of admiration and respect in your future offspring's eyes? ARIS WALES

SEAN WAGNER AND THE NE'ER DO WELLS, GINA NOELL AND THE DOT DOT DOT DOTS, BRIAN COPELAND BAND
(Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta) Sean Wagner is the feathery-voiced solo artist responsible for Tangled and Knotted, a joyful little pop record whose release shall be celebrated tonight. Full-length number three from the Portland singer/songwriter and his eight-piece backing band the Ne'er Do Wells has slight elements of an Elephant Six influence, plus plenty of traditional rock radio charm (think Mason Jennings, or if you prefer the '90s, Freedy Johnston) to go around. While overwhelmingly cautious—one wishes Wagner & Co. took a few more risks—Tangled and Knotted is affable and pleasant, evidence that you don't need much more than good songs and a great voice. EAC

MIAMI HORROR, JEFFREY JERUSALEM, PRESCRIPTION PILLS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) What began as the solo electro-dance project of Australian producer Ben Plant has now been fleshed out into a full band incarnation called Miami Horror. From its 2007 underground beginnings to last year's debut full-length Illumination, the band's extremely danceable yet unfailingly artful music has found acclaim and appreciation, sharing stages with the likes of Lily Allen and Friendly Fires. Plant & Co. will be relocating from Oz to Los Angeles, and tonight they will join one of the most curious of Portland's new bands, the glam and grungy art-rock group Prescription Pills. MARANDA BISH

SATURDAY 6/11

KLEZMOCRACY
(Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta) With Klezmocracy, you pretty much know what you are going to get (more like Kleztatorship, right?). The "Afro-Hebrew" quintet deliver their second full-length, Reach, tonight and it's a robust spattering of Eastern Bloc folk, vintage Harlem jazz, and everything in between (which in this case, is quite literally everything). Opening number "Columbia, the Headwaters" is deliberately paced and mournful, sounding like something Morphine would have written in their most introspective moment, and from there things pick up, with songs like the festive "Hava Netze" and "Mideast Midwest" (which just might be the long-lost instrumental track from Swordfishtrombones) anchoring this impressive recording. EAC

KORY QUINN AND THE COMRADES, ROB STROUP, NAOMI HOOLEY, DREW NORMAN
(Alberta Street Pub, 1036 NE Alberta) I suppose if one could pinpoint exactly what it is that separates good folk and roots-based music from mediocre schlock, everyone would be getting it right. Obviously, not everyone does—but Portland-by-way-of-Indianapolis singer/songwriter Kory Quinn is one of those whose music not only upholds well-worn traditions but also sounds fresh in the process. It might be a case of believability: Quinn's latest nine-song collection, Waitin' for a Train, carries on the tradition of wandering troubadours and train-hopping drifters, and if that's a romantic notion (it's not entirely fabricated—Quinn recently took a trip across the US by train, although it was funded by Kickstarter, so one presumes he wasn't hopping from boxcar to boxcar), it's one that Quinn imbues with authenticity. In a crowded field of local roots musicians, Quinn stands out as one who's got his bead aimed precisely at the truth. NL

WILDBIRDS AND PEACEDRUMS, THERAPIES SON
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) On The Snake, Wildbirds and Peacedrums have delivered a bracing set of arty world pop electrified by Mariam Wallentin's bravura Laura Nyro-meets-Patti Smith emoting and husband Andreas Werliin's diverse, exotic percussion. It was filled with quirkiness that didn't grate—a rare feat. The more recent Rivers refines the duo's polyglot global music while encompassing what sound like ancient Latin hymns for that solemn, very old-school beauty, thanks to the 12-person Schola Cantorum Reykjavik Chamber Choir. W&P excel to a much greater extent live than they do on record, so prepare thyself for an engrossing spectacle. DS

KAY KAY AND HIS WEATHERED UNDERGROUND, YOUR RIVAL
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) The ornate songs of Kay Kay and His Weathered Underground have earned comparisons to '60s baroque pop bands like the Left Banke, but the group's second album—deceptively called Introducing—sounds more like the massive monoliths of pop constructed by Electric Light Orchestra, with both a sunshiny hue of nostalgia and a futuristic, progressive bent. Introducing had a protracted gestation process; producer Tom Pfaeffle passed away in 2009 just as the album's initial recording was completed. The Seattle group then spent the ensuing months in a period of mourning, slowly putting the final touches on an album that serves not so much as an elegy as a renewed celebration of life. The band, a fluctuating lineup that sometimes sees a dozen musicians alongside core Undergrounders Kirk Huffman and Kyle O'Quin, has always put on celebratory shows of dizzying but never nefarious psychedelia, and tonight's Portland release party for Introducing should be no exception. NL

REDWOOD SON, BRAD MACKESON, JORDAN HARRIS, SARAH BILLINGS
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) It seems a little grouchy to criticize a band for releasing too much music, but in the case of Portland folk-rock band Redwood Son, it can’t be helped. Redwood Son’s debut album, The Lion’s Inside, is a double-disc helping of 20 songs, and it’s simply too much. Part of the problem might be that—unlike other double albums like the White Album or London’s Calling—all of the songs are from the pen of a single person, in this case Josh Malm, who’s assembled a great cast of local musicians to assist him on this very lengthy recording. (Kipp Crawford, the Celilo drummer who tragically died in 2009, was in an early lineup of the band.) The Lion’s Inside’s two discs are presumably organized so that the first disc contains a rawer sound while the second has more mainstream material, but to my ears it all sounded like fairly amiable, generic, KINK-ready Americana pop. Maybe this is too harsh—there might very well be a few masterpieces tucked away at the end of disc two. I wouldn’t know. I didn’t make it that far. NL

PORTLAND MUTANT PARTY: WH WALKER, DEFECT DEFECT, GUANTANAMO BAYWATCH, YOUTHBITCH, TENSIONS
(Branx, 320 SE 2nd) Celebrate Mutant Party night number two (Dos Mutantes?) with a raucous gathering of artists culled from the 7-inch series of the same name. Last night’s lineup featured artists from Volume One of the Jonny Cat Records vinyl compilation, and tonight tackles the second edition, with bouncy garage-pop from WH Walker, the jittery hardcore of Defect Defect, and plenty more. All are welcome, even those with the X-gene. EAC

SUNDAY 6/12

BOBBY BARE JR., CAREY KOTSIONIS
(Lola's Room, 1332 W Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

MONDAY 6/13

Happy birthday, Rivers Cuomo. You can stop making music now. For real. Stop it.

TUESDAY 6/14

BLACK LIPS, CEREBRAL BALLZY
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) See My, What a Busy Week!

MARTY MARQUIS, MIKE ELIA
(Valentine's, 232 SW Ankeny) A little Blitzen Trapper downtime never stops Marty Marquis from getting out there and strumming/sipping a few. The copper-haired multi-instrumentalist keeps with the spirit of his full-time band—rootsy folk songs and a proclivity for storytelling (during and in between songs). Also expect a few unexpected covers thrown in the mix. It'll be just like seeing the Trappers... minus the other five members and 1,000 or so fans. And you can probably lob some obscure requests at him. And buy him a beer. And ask him when the new Blitzen Trapper record is coming out, and what it's like to be on Sub Pop. And then tell him how much you love him. Then ask for an autograph. Actually, don't do any of that (except for the beer part). MARK LORE

WEDNESDAY 6/15

ALINA SIMONE
(Record Room, 8 NE Killingsworth) Read our article on Alina Simone.

JASON ISBELL AND THE 400 UNIT, MARIA TAYLOR, KASEY ANDERSON
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Jason Isbell.

NASALROD, STAG BITTEN, BIG BLACK CLOUD
(Mudai, 801 NE Broadway) Portland's Stag Bitten is tough to track down. Their presence on ye ole internet is nearly nonexistent; upon searching their name, all you will find is a handful of videos from sweaty house shows that don't nearly portray what the band's capable of live. Stag Bitten's intensity and condensed talent can only be realized when you're standing in front of this power trio that snarls like Cerberus at the gates of the underworld (He's a three-headed dog, get it?). They're not quite metal, not quite hardcore punk, and not quite danceable. What they are is musical savagery at its most vicious. AW

GROUPER, SARAH DOUGHER, SETH NEHIL, FLASH CHOIR, BRYSON HANSEN, DJ YETI
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Portland's Flash Choir is the house band of sorts for tonight's installment of the New Musics quarterly series at Holocene. They'll be performing with Grouper, Sarah Dougher, Seth Nihil, and Bryson Hansen in a series of arty new compositions that may or may not require some context. Dougher performs Fin de Siecle I, an "experimental poem play" commissioned by poet Leslie Scalapino; Nihil performs a working version of the upcoming Children's Games, which gets a full premiere in October. Liz Harris (AKA Grouper), meanwhile, performs PART, a tape collage series that deals with interior space and interactions with others. It all sounds very heady and very arty, but it should prove to be an adventurous and atypical night with intriguing approaches to performance. And in the case of Grouper, whose chilling, hushed musical environments are nothing less than completely immersive, it will be an excellent opportunity to see one of Portland's greatest talents perform new work. NL