KATHRYN CALDER Backspace, 10/28

THURSDAY 10/27

GROUPER, DANIEL MENCHE, PORT ST. WILLOW
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Liz Harris can silence a room without saying a word. There's something about the deeply meditative music she creates as Grouper that facilitates a full-body shutdown, allowing listeners to tap into forgotten memories and tenuous dream states. We're talking about audio hypnosis here. This effect has largely been attributed to Harris' sentient, elemental guitar work and vocals, but a closer look reveals the magic of her meticulous pacing and homemade tape collages. Harris' most recent performance at September's TBA Festival proved that the artist's compositional structure has finally come to match her conceptual breadth. With the lulling noise from her cassettes escaping almost inaudibly, it wasn't until several minutes later when vocals from the Portland Flash Choir were introduced that the audience realized they had been witnessing a performance all along. As Harris says, she loves to explore "what exists in corners, on the periphery of our awareness." CHRIS CANTINO

FRIDAY 10/28

PBR PRESENTS THE 1980s
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See My, What a Busy Week!

WICKED AWESOME!: BEYONDADOUBT, MR. CHARMING, ROY G BIV, LUNCHLADY, CHELSEA STARR, STORMY ROXX, BRUCE LABRUISER
(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) See Destination Halloween.

MR. GNOME, BOATS, PAPER UPPER CUTS
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Mr. Gnome.

KING TUFF, THE SUICIDE NOTES, GUANTANAMO BAYWATCH, STILL CAVES
(East End, 203 SE Grand) Most dudes are lucky to be in one great band; Kyle Thomas of Brattleboro, Vermont, has been in at least four. You've heard of Witch—that's the metal band J Mascis plays drums for—and you might have heard of Happy Birthday, who released an overlooked record on Sub Pop last year. You also might have heard of Feathers, the freak-folk collective that released a far-out debut on Devendra Banhart's label in 2006 and then floated into the ether. But the name you need to concern yourself with right now is Tuff—King Tuff, that is, Thomas' alter-ego of scuzzily sweet garage and flower-power psych. There's a fucking phenomenal full-length released by Tee Pee in 2008 called King Tuff Was Dead, and a recent split 7-inch with the Hex Dispensers, plus a bunch of tracks littered over the internet. They all have one thing in common: the potential to be your next favorite song. With groovy jangle, indestructible power-pop structure, fuzz-mop guitars, and Thomas' dopey, grinning voice, King Tuff's shag rock is almost too easy to love. NED LANNAMANN

KATHRYN CALDER, LIKE A VILLAIN
(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) Kathryn Calder wrote her first solo album, Are You My Mother?, while her own mom was dying from ALS. The album's not a downer, but it's not what you'd call upbeat, with pleasant, self-soothing melodies and sparse instrumentation. Sixteen months later, Calder has released a follow-up album of thick, layered... synthpop. A lot of people are jumping on that bus these days, but Calder's credentials precede current trends: Bright and Vivid hearkens back to her pre-New Pornographers career with the Immaculate Machine—guitar-and-synth hooks, beats, loops, Calder's church-choir voice distorted and mixed low on the best songs (see: "One, Two, Three," like a shoegaze anthem from 1992). Bright and Vivid is interesting and easy to like, but sophisticated enough not to give it all up at first listen. What's brand new is Calder's confidence as a musician and songwriter. REBECCA WILSON

UNKNOWN PLEASURES, THE BAND WHO FELL TO EARTH, THE MAGIC PUMPKIN
(Tonic Lounge, 3100 NE Sandy) The list of film directors who compose their own music is short and all over the map (Satyajit Ray, yes; Charlie Chaplin, okay; Clint Eastwood? What the...), but at the top of that odd list is creepmeister John Carpenter. His repetitive scores practically created the horror-soundtrack shorthand that's been used to convey eerie unease in virtually every movie since 1978's Halloween. Taking his cues from American minimalists, German krautrockers, and the tightly wound music-box prog of Italy's Goblin—not to mention a liberal heaping from Englishman Mike Oldfield's "Tubular Bells," which was put to memorable use in The Exorcist—Carpenter's music has become synonymous with slowly ratcheting tension. Portland horror-movie aficionado Willy Greer has arranged a suite of six of Carpenter's scores, and it will be performed by the Magic Pumpkin ensemble—a band named for Halloween weekend if there ever was one—complete with "strobing visuals." Joy Division and David Bowie covers round out the night. NL

SATURDAY 10/29

IN THE CREMATORIUM II: DJ COOKY PARKER, THE ANGRY ORTS, THIS CHARMING MAN
(The Woods, 6637 SE Milwaukie) See My, What a Busy Week!

MUTANT PARTY: KING LOUIE, MIDNITE SNAXXX, CHEMICALS, DENIZENZ, LOOSE VALUES, PATAHA HISS, DJ CECILIA, DJ HWY 7
(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) See Destination Halloween.

SNAP!: DR. ADAM, COLIN JONES, DJ TANT, DJ SAME DNA, CLAUDE BALZAC
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See Destination Halloween.

JEFF BECK
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) Rolling Stone ranked Jeff Beck at number 14 in its "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time" list. So, see you at the show. You want more? Okay, Beck, now 67, catalyzed the Yardbirds' explosive and cosmic garage-psych attack in the '60s with artful distortion, fuzz, and feedback, and then went on to lead some fantastic bands throughout the '70s and add mercenary six-string firepower for Stevie Wonder, Kate Bush, Roger Waters, and other millionaires. Beck is a mercurial embellisher of blues, rock, funk, and heavy-metal tropes, but his peak came with "Beck's Bolero," the 1967 B-side to "Hi Ho Silver Lining." There, he reconfigured Ravel's classical standard into a grandiloquent rave-up, an obelisk of the most sublimely coruscating guitar tones. It's one of the greatest recordings ever. DAVE SEGAL

MAC MILLER, PEOPLE UNDER THE STAIRS, CASEY VEGGIES
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Mac Miller is crazy popular for some reason. The 19-year-old's Roseland show is sold out, he has over one million Twitter followers, and his YouTube videos have nearly 165 million views. But it's hard to tell exactly what sets Miller apart from the sea of other blog-friendly rappers out there. His lyrics rarely deviate from cliché cool-schoolkid subject matter (weed, girls, clothes, shoes, poppin' bottles, and gettin' money), and his singsong hooks take a page straight out of fellow Pittsburgher Wiz Khalifa's success manual. Does Miller really have that much "#swag" or is he just "well connected"? MIKE RAMOS

MANCHESTER ORCHESTRA, WHITE DENIM, THE DEAR HUNTER, LITTLE HURRICANE
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) The past five months have been good to Atlanta "alternative" (read: just a little emo) rock band Manchester Orchestra, given the rather rampant success of their third full-length, Simple Math. Curiously enough, Simple Math is a concept album rooted in autobiography, with lead singer Andy Hull paring down his life story from a bramble maze of 100 tracks to a mere 10. If nothing else, Hull's songwriting has reached its evocative peak, and the band as a whole is fully capable of lifting those impassioned songs right off the page. Joining Manchester Orchestra on this rather massive tour is Austin's White Denim, whose recent EP, Takes Place in Your Work Space, is brimming with catchy, circuitous guitar riffs and the kind of Texas charm you can only find in the state's heathen city. RAQUEL NASSER

SUNDAY 10/30

OCTOSSIPPI: NICK JAINA, RYAN SOLLEE, RITCHIE YOUNG, ADAM SHEARER, MATT SHEEHY, LEWI LONGMIRE, DAVE DEPPER, KYLE MORTON AND MINI TYPHOON & MORE
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See My, What a Busy Week!

HUME, GRANDPARENTS, DUCK LITTLE BROTHER DUCK
(Valentine's, 232 SW Ankeny) I thought I knew my Grandparents. I mean, I love them no matter what, but I was naturally surprised when they totally flipped on me and changed up their sound. You would expect some level of consistency from your Grandparents, right? Well, it took some getting used to, but it turns out my new Grandparents are actually way cooler than the old ones. Even though I miss those nug-sparking Floydian jams, I'm totally down to trade them out for this goo-gazey coupling of Kevin Shields' tape-wrapped whammy with taut, garage-kraut workouts. Grandparents' new EP Sugar Beach documents a band unchained, yet in total control, playing really fucking loud. In fact, it pretty much legitimizes Grandparents as THE number one band to keep an eye on in this town right now. CC

WILD ONES, YOUTH, OCEAN AGE
(The Woods, 6637 SE Milwaukie) While it's not formally All Hallow's Eve just yet, this show is within the sprawling realm of Halloween—which apparently spans the entirety of October on SE Hawthorne—and there are few better ways to enliven our dying spirits than by bopping about aimlessly to Wild Ones in an old funeral parlor (and preferably in a toilet-paper mummy costume). If you have yet to catch wind of this band—they've only been playing shows around town since February—you must not deprive yourself any longer. Their first recorded effort, the You're a Winner EP, is a tidy collection of synthpop beatitudes, and the latest track emancipated from the band's vaults, "Need It All," is a fantastic, slightly more mercurial sign of what's to come from their impending debut. Plus, it's their last show in Portland before they strike out on the BFF tour with, well, BFFs Typhoon and Youth, so come and wish the bands well on their way. RN

MONDAY 10/31

FIN DE CINEMA PRESENTS ALICE: WAMPIRE, LITANIC MASK, BRUXA, SICK JAGGERS
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

DEAD ROCKERS HALLOWEEN 2011: CYCLOPS, ALICE COOPER TRIBUTE, MOTLEY CRUDE, DAMNED TRIBUTE, BUZZCOCKS TRIBUTE
(East End, 203 SE Grand) See Destination Halloween.

TWIN PEAKS COSTUME PARTY: VJ KEEP IT ON THE BROWNLOWE
(Record Room, 8 NE Killingsworth) See Destination Halloween.

RICHARD THOMPSON, THE WEBB SISTERS
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) I can't think of many artists less Halloweeny than English-born songwriter/guitarist Richard Thompson—to my knowledge he has written zero songs about candy—but the man has been known to do a Britney Spears cover or two. Thompson probably won't be doing too many covers (the musical equivalent of putting on a costume) during his two-night stint at the Aladdin; rather, on this solo acoustic tour, he's revisiting his own back catalog, doing a mini-set of three or four songs from a randomly selected album from his immense discography. Considering how many records the man has put out since leaving Fairport Convention in 1971, that's a lot of ground, and the chances are good for him to play something quite rare—and considering how consistent a songwriter he is, the chances are equally good that it'll be something great. Plus, there will be costumes: Look for an alarming number of middle-aged male disciples wearing Thompson's trademark beret. NL

MONARQUES, GRINGO STAR, BEISBOL
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Sure they have a silly band name, but Atlanta's Gringo Star crank out some serious pop songs. These guys should even be taken seriously. "Shadow" from their just-released sophomore LP Count Yer Lucky Stars is a tropical doo-wop number polished to a beautiful sheen by producer Ben Allen, responsible for the big sounds found on the equally goofily named Gnarls Barkley's St. Elsewhere and Animal Collective's Merriweather Post Pavilion. Essentially, it's taken Gringo Star's '60s-inspired pop to new frontiers. While the songs have always been there, Gringo Star's gravestone following an early death could have easily read something like: "Silly Name; Loved the Kinks." Count Yer Lucky Stars has given them a second life. I think these gringos might be around for a while. MARK LORE

TRENTEMØLLER, XYLOS, NATASHA KMETO
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Having made the transition from DJ of understated, minimal techno to full-on bandleader heading one of the most gripping live shows around, Anders Trentemøller's electronic music is full of high drama, even as it bears a decidedly Danish level of restraint. His latest double album Remixed/Reworked contains both his own mixes of other bands (Depeche Mode, Franz Ferdinand, his fellow countrymen in Efterklang) and reworkings of his own songs by others. Putting the patchwork nature of such a compilation aside, it holds together remarkably well, and it straddles a wide array of styles from the most obvious floor-bangers to minutely detailed patterns. While many other electronic artists aim squarely for a physical response from their audience, Trentemøller demands an intellectual one as well, and coupled with the spectacle of his live show, this will be a Halloween dance party that's much more than a sugar rush. NL

TUESDAY 11/1

DIA DE LOS MUERTOS: GRUPO XOCHIPILLI, EDNA VASQUEZ, RAFA DE ALASKA Y SUS COMPAS, DEATH SONGS, DJ CHAACH, DJ CUCUY
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

PETER WOLF CRIER, BIRDS & BATTERIES
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our article on Peter Wolf Crier.

RICHARD THOMPSON, THE WEBB SISTERS
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) See Monday's listing.

YOUTHBITCH, WHITE FANG
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Ah, Youthbitch. How your name suits you. Your new album, the brilliantly titled YouthbitchYouthbitchYouthbitchYouthbitchYouthbitch, was recorded on a budget of "three six-packs and some pizzas," and it sounds like the reason some adults spank their kids. It's the perfect pastiche of cheeky Brit-punk and powerpop à la the Boys and Mick Jones, or the Adverts on less speed. Pretty much the perfect soundtrack for knife-fighting or pilfering your mom's happy pills. I'm telling you, songwriters Nico and Poleman really piss their pants on this record, and their adolescent songs of truancy, whorish girlfriends, and C-minuses are outrageously skeezy and fun. If it sounds like these boys are no frills, it's because they are. But ya know what, they've got moxie, and you don't need to fuck with that. Just get off my couch and find a goddamn job already! CC

WEDNESDAY 11/2

THE FIELD, THE MIRACLES CLUB, OPERATIVE, DJ GENEVIEVE D
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

ANAMANAGUCHI, STARSCREAM, COPY
(Branx, 320 SE 2nd) When I heard Anamanaguchi's first LP, Dawn Metropolis (2009), I was certain they were a flash-in-the-pan gimmick, destined to collapse at the first sign of a dusty Nintendo or their own boredom. Two years and one Scott Pilgrim videogame soundtrack later, Anamanaguchi and their NES are still infusing poppy guitar, bass, and drum songs with mid-'80s nostalgia. These guys play against a backdrop of neuron-collapsing animation and one song blends into the next—but the songs are darn infectious. Certain people may even feel compelled to jump up and down. They share the bill with Starscream, a darker, possibly nerdier computer band with whom they have collaborated on a split 7-inch. Starscream sounds infinitely more grownup, just by sometimes using minor chords and having songs with varying tempos. They rock, and can be enjoyed by those who would rather not jump in public. RW

STILL CORNERS, GANGLIANS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) When Sub Pop finds a band that achieves a modicum of success, it tends to sign another couple in that vein to try to replicate that formula. So it goes with Still Corners, as evidenced on their Sub Pop debut, Creatures of an Hour. You can hear clear echoes of Beach House in Tessa Murray's diaphanous vocals and Greg Hughes' murmuring organ flourishes and hushed atmospheres. You will also notice unmistakable evocations of Broadcast's more melancholically splendorous moments. That Still Corners grip me harder than Beach House speaks to the former's more robust rhythmic thrust, closer resemblance to the aforementioned Broadcast, and overall darker melodic spectrum. DS