CRUSHED OUT Hawthorne Theatre Lounge, Thurs 11/8
GRIFFIN DAVIS

WEDNESDAY 11/7

STARS, JETS OVERHEAD
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) See My, What a Busy Week!

THOSE DARLINS, HEAVY CREAM, DON’T
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Dear whoever made Those Darlins and Heavy Cream tourmates: HELL TO THE YES, AND THANK YOU! These two Nashville bands (along with Atlanta’s Coathangers, Seattle’s Eighteen Individual Eyes, and Vancouver’s Nu Sensae) are helping to fill the void of tough female voices in a fickle modern world lousy with Lana Del Reys. Heavy Cream have a song called “Prison Shanks” that’s hard as steel and impossible to not to headbang to; and Those Darlins hit the garage-rock nail on the head with their new song, “Summer’s Dead.” Both of these songs are on a new split 7-inch that’s only available at the tour merch table. Also on the table: Those Darlins’ Screws Get Loose, produced by Scott Litt (R.E.M., Nirvana, Patti Smith) and Heavy Cream’s Super Treatment, produced by Ty Segall. KELLY O

THURSDAY 11/8

SIREN NATION FESTIVAL: JD SAMSON AND MEN, EMA, LA SERA
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See My, What a Busy Week!

CRUSHED OUT, NEW YORK RIFLES
(Hawthorne Theatre Lounge, 1507 SE 39th) Remember the band Boom Chick? No? Well, it's probably better if you don't—they're called Crushed Out now, so that's the name you need to know. Crushed Out's great new album, Want to Give, sees the Brooklyn duo of guitarist/singer Frank Hoier and drummer Moselle Spiller bashing out terrific-sounding rock 'n' roll, digging up echoes of Buddy Holly, Dick Dale, and of course the White Stripes. With stripped-down arrangements and great songs, Crushed Out sound ready for anything. NED LANNAMANN

MV & EE, LOST CREEK RAMBLERS, BRUMES
(Little Axe Records, 5012 NE 28th) Self-described as "lunar raga," MV & EE (Matt Valentine and Erika Elder) clearly have a strong enough familiarity with off-kilter melody to accurately label themselves as such. But it's not only "lunar" raga—it's an Americana raga, which is as interesting to listen to as it is to say out loud. Imagine Neil Young's and Pink Floyd's languidness combined with the unsettled temperament of Tim Kinsella's music and you'd get, well, the aural depiction of what it's like to peel off an acid trip while floating down a river. A really bright, tinny, waveless river. Considering they've put out over 30 releases in the past decade, it's not incredibly surprising that their lineage floats on and off of apparent improvisation, but that feel is the flesh and blood of their ideological sound. It all comes off effortlessly, as if they couldn't stop making music even if they tried. JONATHAN MAGDALENO

SONS OF HUNS, BLACK SKIES, CALTROP, BISON BISON
(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) I only learned about Sons of Huns in February, with the release of their 11-track Live at the Banana Stand recording. I didn't know anything about them when I started listening; five minutes later, that live album—which sounds fantastic—had effectively annihilated every trace of wintry sluggishness from my brain. Nothing clears the cobwebs from the attic like some metal in the garage. A few months later, they have a new 7-inch with an accompanying video for "Leaving Your Body," evidence of a true commitment to disseminating their eyebrow-singeing rock to the masses. Unlike most garage acts these days (and there are a lot of them), Sons of Huns aren't a retro act. They don't sound like star-struck fans of the Ramones, the MC5, or the Stooges. Revisiting the past can be a lot of fun, but hard rock has a future, and Sons of Huns are writing it. REBECCA WILSON

FRIDAY 11/9

THRILL JOCKEY RECORDS 20TH ANNIVERSARY SHOW: TRANS AM, LITURGY, ETERNAL TAPESTRY, BARN OWL, MIKE SCHEIDT, GOLDEN RETRIEVER, JASON URICK
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our article on Thrill Jockey Records.

MARK EITZEL, PETER BUCK
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) Mark Eitzel has a long history of spinning sad drunken barroom songs. But people grow up. So the heralded singer/songwriter, who spent a fair amount of his time at the helm of American Music Club singing about getting drunk bellied up at the bar, is now focusing more of his great storytelling abilities on tales of dinner parties and guests who bring terrible bottles of wine. This laidback approach to partying suits the folksy songs of Eitzel, as shown on his new solo album Don't Be a Stranger. His Americana-rich voice has all the lonely yearning of the past, with his trademark funny and smart and self-deprecating lyrics, like in album highlight "Oh Mercy," where he sings, "Please, please invite me to your party... I haven't talked to anyone in days/but look I brought all this imported beer." Then he gets all drunk and sloppy in the kitchen after enchanting everyone with erudite conversation. I guess some things don't change—you can count on Eitzel's well-crafted songs and lost weekends. With longtime collaborator R.E.M.'s Peter Buck on the same bill, this should be a grown-up evening of slow-sipping songs. COURTNEY FERGUSON

SIREN NATION FESTIVAL: ALELA DIANE, JESSE SYKES, ANTJE DUVEKOT
(Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta) This year's Siren Nation Festival—empowering women of all ages to create their own art, and highlighting the many achievements of women in the arts—is a many splendored thing. With performances across the city for five days straight, your show-going docket ought to be filled. Alela Diane's unwavering tribal folk is practically an institution. Diane spent the early part of this year scaling back her bulging live band (of which her father is a member), and instead revisited her roots as a solo performer after splitting from Rough Trade Records. Her upcoming album, likely to be released by someone early next year, is tentatively titled About Farewell, and according to Diane is "basically a public recitation of my diary." That sound you just heard is everyone in Portland sighing in joy at the same time. RYAN J. PRADO

JEFFREY LEWIS AND THE JUNKYARD, FELSEN, NEW MEXICAN REVOLUTION
(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) I regret enlisting a laughably trite opening line like this, but how come Jeffrey Lewis isn't huge? There's no doubt that he's one of the best lyricists currently producing music—easily right up there with John Darnielle—but how many more fucking records does this guy have to make (including various collaborations, he's released over 20) until he achieves anything that even remotely resembles a break? Why isn't he selling out arenas or making national television appearances or gaining recognition as one of the greatest songwriters of his generation? It seems like Lewis occupies somewhat of a blind spot: too "creepy" and emphatic and genuinely nerdy (not like Rivers Cuomo or Michael Cera adorable-nerdy) to appeal to any facet of the mainstream, while the parochial pitchfork-wielding critics have consistently accused him of mere Richman imitating. Those people don't know what love is and are bad at listening to music. "Don't Be Upset" is a perfect mid-autumn jam, and several others come close. MORGAN TROPER

SATURDAY 11/10

PIERCED ARROWS, WHITE FANG, K-TEL '79
(Tonic Lounge, 3100 NE Sandy) See My, What a Busy Week!

A.C. NEWMAN, HARRIET
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on A.C. Newman.

PSYCHIC TV, DBC, KING DUDE, VICE DEVICE
(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) Genesis Breyer P-Orridge (born Neil Megson) has changed a lot over the past four decades—both musically and physically through work with proto-industrial band Throbbing Gristle and psychedelic rock unit Psychic TV, and P-Orridge's pandrogynous morph in honor of late wife Lady Jaye. Genesis is living, breathing art, and continues to make art, as well as continuing to create music under the Psychic TV moniker. The band just released the 12-inch Silver Sundown Machine vs. Alien Lightning Meat Machine, their first in five years, and the evolution of the music and Genesis herself seems endless. MARK LORE

TWO COW GARAGE, TRUCKSTOP DARLIN', THE COPYRIGHTS, I CAN LICK ANY SONOFABITCH IN THE HOUSE
(Dante's, 1 SW 3rd) Columbus, Ohio's Two Cow Garage don't get to the West Coast nearly as often as they ought to, what with them being musical kindred spirits to Portland's I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch in the House and all. The band—led by gravel-throated vocalist/guitarist Micah Schnabel—boasts a rabid following for its ornery hybrid of rough-and-tumble punk rock opuses and Springsteenish pageantry, probably most affectingly on the 2008 LP Speaking in Cursive. The band followed up that effort with 2010's Sweet Saint Me, released on Suburban Home Records, and is now just inches away from a vinyl reissue of their 2004 release, The Wall Against Our Back. Expect a rowdy dust-up of larynx-shredding anthems, loud rock 'n' roll and earnest sentiment by a bunch of dudes (including ICLASOBITH) who sound like they could beat the shit out of you, but probably won't. RJP

SUNDAY 11/11

SIREN NATION FESTIVAL: CARINA ROUND, ROSI GOLAN
(Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta) Fans of Puscifer—one of the side projects of Tool's Maynard James Keenan—will recognize singer Carina Round, as she has lent her vocal talent to that project. But Round's solo career is what's really worth paying attention to. The British-born, LA-based singer/songwriter released the excellent Slow Motion Addict in 2007 and the even better Tigermending earlier this year. With macabre, powerful, adult pop, Round is a force of nature. Almost no one showed up at her last Portland gig, so she took the opportunity to drink a lot of whiskey and get to know the tiny crowd. Even then, Round put on a great show—so don't miss this one. NL

LEONARD COHEN
(Rose Garden, 1 Center Ct) The 2009 return of Leonard Cohen will rightly be remembered as one of the greatest resurrections in pop music history. Finding himself close to broke after a lifetime of work thanks to a shady manager, Cohen got his 70-something self back onstage, and created a ravishing musical spectacle that captured Cohen in full, new bloom. Songs drawn from over 40 years were brought to life by a ridiculously accomplished band, over which Cohen murmured his one-of-a-kind words. Audiences swooned, and Cohen came off tour inspired enough to bang out a new record, 2012’s wonderful Old Ideas. Tonight, the 21st-century Leonard Cohen Experience returns, and anyone with a gazillion dollars should totally go. (Seriously, dude’s prices are almost Barbra Streisand-high.) DAVID SCHMADER Also see My, What a Busy Week!

BRANDI CARLILE, BLITZEN TRAPPER
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) The Pacific Northwest exports a lot of melodious Americana, and now two of the most widely loved are sharing the stage. Blitzen Trapper, of course, needs no introduction, which must be why they're opening. Out with her fourth LP is country songstress Brandi Carlile. Hailing from the boonies of Washington, Carlile grew up obsessed with Patsy Cline. She doesn't seem to have grown out of this, and that's why I find her so compelling. Her fourth album, Bear Creek, is a soulful, leisurely album, easy to listen to, with a few soundtrack-ready singles. The album gracefully confronts the blahs of turning 30 in a surprisingly mature way. But Carlile is nothing if not backward gazing, and her sweetly textured voice is meant for country. That's probably why I favor her more old-timey songs ("Keep Your Heart Young" and the gospel tune "Raise Hell") over the incursions into roots rock ("Hard Way Home"). RW

SIREN NATION: REBECCA GATES, THE MYNABIRDS, YENTA
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) The first (and only) time I saw the Mynabirds was at Pickathon this summer. Yes, Laura Burhenn was wearing that wolf hat you see in photos, and yes, she took command of the nighttime crowd and had everyone dancing in the moonlight. Generals is a strong, exclamatory follow-up record that was apparently inspired by the Avedon photo "Generals of the Daughters of the Revolution." To say the album is solely about female empowerment would be untrue, but there is a political charge to it, paired with poppy dance beats, anthem-like lyrics, and blues guitar. The more I listen to her music, the more I don't want to miss her at this year's Siren Nation Fest, where we'll be able to catch her as part of the new generation of revolutionary women. RACHEL MILBAUER

GENERATIONALS, RACES
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) New Orleans duo Generationals make pop music that's instantly catchy and instantly familiar. It's also difficult to pin down exactly where their hearts reside, as members Ted Joyner and Grant Widmer cycle through American and British pop from the '60s through the '80s. Maybe that's where the name comes from. If anything, Generationals' brand of pop will take you back to your youth—summers off, school dances, growing pains. If you're presently living this glorious period in your life, Generationals are here for you. The bonus is they'll hopefully open your ears to a flood of great music that came before them. ML

GENDERS, THE BLACK APPLES, WOODWINDS
(Rontoms, 600 E Burnside) When Portland group Youth split earlier this year, members Maggie Morris, Stephen Leisy, and Matthew Hall quickly picked up the pieces and formed Genders, adding drummer Katherine Paul (Forest Park) to round out the new group. Now Genders is releasing their debut EP, a self-titled, three-track record that's sparkly, buoyant, and forlorn—the group describes themselves as "psych-pop-mope-dance" and it's tough to find something more precise than that. Their EP is excellent, highlighted by "Sugarcoat," a yearning pop tune that shifts from calm and collected, to soaring with abandon with the shrugging shift from chorus to verse. Genders celebrate the release of their EP with LA's the Black Apples and Woodwinds, the project of Megan Spear of Jared Mees and the Grown Children, who also have a new record released tonight. NL

LOSS, WORM OUROBOROS, DISEMBALLERINA, EPHEMEROS
(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) All right, you seasonally depressed heshers out there, stop pining for the return of the sun—because Portland's newest doom troop Ephemeros is here with the soundtrack you need for your weather-induced despair. A Portland all-star band of sorts, Ephemeros features members from such faded greats as Anon Remora, Nux Vomica, and El Cerdo. For those who like their heavy emotions complemented by equally heavy riffs, Ephemeros provides the desolation and sadness you crave via some serious sonic devastation. Think Pallbearer, but with much harsher vocals and a smidge less melody. Bring a hefty bag of juicy imaginary oranges ripe for the squeezing, because this is epic, claw-raising shit. ARIS WALES

STATIONTOSTATION: HOLCOMBE WALLER
(The Secret Society, 116 NE Russell) It's a live show and a recording session: StationToStation is the brainchild of engineer Sean Flora, who captures bands in the live setting for an internet simulcast (radio.seanflora.net) and a rebroadcast on KZME 107.1 at a later date. Tonight StationToStation's subject is Portland songwriter Holcombe Waller, who you last saw playing keys for Menomena, and has some new material to share. I think the idea is that this concert/session will provide recorded material for Waller's next album, although both he and Flora likely won't know for sure until they see what's on the tape. At any rate, Waller is worth seeing in any capacity, playing subtle but knife-twisting folk that dances with the elements, sung in an elastic voice with a remarkable range. NL

MONDAY 11/12

ANDREW JACKSON JIHAD, FUTURE OF THE LEFT, JEFF ROSENSTOCK
(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) See My, What a Busy Week!

JON SPENCER BLUES EXPLOSION, QUASI
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Jon Spencer and his explosive bluesmen have their detractors, but I’m not one of ’em. First, I cut Spencer tons of slack for heading Pussy Galore in the ’80s. Their sleazy noize middle-fingered music-biz conventions with gloriously spazzy nihilism. Second, those early Blues Explosion LPs ripped roots rock a few new ones—and roots rock still can’t s(h)it right. Third, the new album, Meat and Bone, slashes with much of the same ruthless, ribald power of those aforementioned early works. JSBX shouldn’t be sounding this vital this late in their career, but, surprisingly, they don’t need sonic Viagra. Fourth, you’re jealous that your woman wants Jon Spencer. DAVE SEGAL

TUESDAY 11/13

JAPANDROIDS, BLEACHED
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) See My, What a Busy Week!