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This Week's Music Highlights

PETUNIA AND THE VIPERS Mississippi Studios, 12/27

PETUNIA AND THE VIPERS Mississippi Studios, 12/27

WEDNESDAY 12/26

PUSSY CONTROL: NATHAN DETROIT, BLACK DOG
(Dig a Pony, 736 SE Grand) See My, What a Busy Week!

THURSDAY 12/27

EMILY WELLS, TIMMY STRAW
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

AND AND AND, THE WE SHARED MILK, PICTORIALS
(Tonic Lounge, 3100 NE Sandy) See My, What a Busy Week!

PETUNIA AND THE VIPERS, WHAT HEARTS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) It's two days after Christmas, and you've eaten enough candy canes to ensure psychedelic spit and sugar bumps through at least the end of the year. Everybody blew it and neglected to remember you're vegan, so your holiday dinner consisted of mashed potatoes and bread. And your parents were being assholes about the whole "unemployment" thing. It's officially time to get out of the holiday malaise, and it's tough to imagine a more swingin' way to brush off the blues than with Vancouver, BC's Petunia and the Vipers. Petunia's Jimmie Rodgers croon, pedal-steel soul, and easy-does-it cowboy tunes recall shooting-star nights sitting around the campfire on the range. The band's excellent self-titled debut switches gears from track to track, proffering juke-joint scorchers like "Maybe Baby Amy" against smoldering, yodel-led retro-western tunes like album opener "The Cricket Song." Best paired with good whiskey and a 10-gallon hat. RYAN J. PRADO

BEATS ANTIQUE
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) I'd be merely speculating if I said Beats Antique are the faces and the soundtrack to Burning Man, although a quick check shows the Bay Area collective has played the desert festival the past three years. The group's music brings an old-world, Middle Eastern influence to modern-day hiphop and electronic music. You'd think the music would be more interesting. It does serve a purpose for member Zoe Jakes' onstage belly dancing, and the awful dancing their mostly white audience undoubtedly takes part in at Beats Antique's performances. It's more about spectacle than anything else. And you know what you're getting into. Bring your art car/Zipcar and enjoy the ride. MARK LORE

FRIDAY 12/28

BEATS ANTIQUE
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) See Thursday's listing.

DON'T, THE BLOODTYPES, THE RANSOM
(Club 21, 2035 NE Glisan) Before Portland earned its reputation as a playground for young adults, it was (and continues to be) home to individuals who devoted themselves to lifelong efforts at creative endeavors. Thankfully, this side of the city endures amid escalating stereotypes, and is on display with the musical project Don't. Formed in 2009, the band combines the talents of legendary local musicians Sam Henry (drummer of the Wipers, member of the Oregon Music Hall of Fame, and tonight's birthday boy) and Dave Minick (bassist for Napalm Beach and more), with the pioneering spirits of guitarist Dan Lowinger (the Love Lasers) and vivacious frontwoman Jenny Don't. The result is music that sounds effortlessly timeless, while pulsating with that new and earnest energy we call rock 'n' roll—soon to be captured on a new 7-inch for DIY Long Island imprint Dead Broke Rekerds. MARANDA BISH

ITAL, ACID FARM, DASANI REBOOT
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Ital is the façade erected by Daniel Martin-McCormick to stand in front of his experiment in dance music, where "dance" means whatever you want it to. Martin-McCormick is a cerebral Brooklynite whose past collaborations include Black Eyes and Mi Ami, but Ital is not a reinvention—Martin-McCormick's output is defined by constant experimentation. This year, after a string of EPs, Ital has released two records, Hive Mind and Dream On. Though tinkering with dance music is all the rage right now, Ital's albums are deliberate and thoughtful and certainly not fashionable. Ital transgresses the idea of what dance music has traditionally meant—a sweaty, sexualized medium for people whose main interest is the activity of dancing—and offers up a challenging, impressionistic, fractured alternative. Sometimes, it's even very beautiful. It's what might happen after staying up all night reading Derrida and listening to the Prodigy's entire catalog. REBECCA WILSON

THE NO TOMORROW BOYS, THE CRY, STUMBLEBUM, A HAPPY DEATH
(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) Doug Rogers took the reins of Slabtown back in February, and he's closing out 2012 with a bang: a four-day weekend with some of his favorite bands that have played the club since his tenure started. Tonight kicks things off in fine form with a quartet of Portland's rowdiest and rockingest. The No Tomorrow Boys kick out punk-rock jams performed at full speed, and their 2012 Animal Eyes 7-inch is appealingly cloaked in rockabilly reverb, like Eddie Cochrane and the Ramones co-hosting an all-night kegger. The Cry, meanwhile, have a splendid power-pop platter with their self-titled debut, packed with glam-rock teenage kicks. Stumblebum makes roaring, angry punk that would make Lemmy's mole tremble in fear. And A Happy Death makes lysergic, spookily romantic psych rock for your prettiest waking nightmares. The weekend progresses—regresses?—all the way up until New Year's Eve, with a bill featuring Bloodtypes, Chemicals, and Fasters. NED LANNAMANN

SATURDAY 12/29

PIERCED ARROWS, THE SUICIDE NOTES
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE 39th) See My, What a Busy Week!

THE SUPERSUCKERS, BURN THE STAGE
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) The Supersuckers, and their mustachioed, perma-smirked frontman Eddie Spaghetti, have been proclaiming themselves the "greatest rock 'n' roll band in the world" for years now. Whether or not the claim holds true is up for debate (and should be debated, because this is America). But just making such a bold proclamation is pretty fucking rock 'n' roll. And the band's been at it for years, a modern-day AC/DC where every song is essentially "Shoot to Thrill" done over and over. Or in the Supersuckers' case, "Creepy Jackalope Eye." Hey, even these guys released a singles collection called The Songs All Sound the Same. Supersuckers shows are a good excuse to drink, flail, and forget about the grind of life. If that's not rock 'n' roll, I don't know what is. MARK LORE

LITTLE LORD FAUNTLEROY, M.A.R.C., HEARTS OF PLAID
(Foggy Notion, 3416 N Lombard) From first note, Little Lord Fauntleroy appeals immediately to the musical weirdo. Their debut recording, Sexual Exploits from a Gruesome Coffin, launches with raunchy saxophone riffs uncommon to garage rock, soon joined by sweltering synths, joyous syncopation, and an accented lyrical delivery reminiscent of Of Montreal's Kevin Barnes in both tone and provocatively bizarre subject matter. The project originated with a group of musicians who have been playing prolifically across Portland stages in recent years—in bands like Mattress and the Reservations—and seems predicated on a relentless inclination to experiment and revel in musical styles that band members find pleasing, despite unusual or unconventional combination or culminating effect. MB

SUNDAY 12/30

WIND IT UP 2012: THE WOOLEN MEN, THE MEMORIES, REGULAR MUSIC, WOODEN INDIAN BURIAL GROUND, CHARTS, JJAAXXNN
(Rontoms, 600 E Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

RADIATION CITY, ANCIENT HEAT
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Have you visited Radiation City? It's a dreamy place, a midcentury relic filled with butterfly roofs, reverb, and the heady promise of a nuclear-powered utopia. Spam and martinis are what's for dinner. Naturally, doo-wop pervades. But it's been inverted, tossed in a pastel blender with shards of soul and synth, and fed to a girl group that has shrugged off its No Boys Allowed sign. Radiation City's full-length debut, The Hands That Take You, rides the line between nostalgia and the here and now, like hearing the Shirelles through the decayed speakers of the future. It's at once comforting and stimulating. Which is a good thing, because Ancient Heat is a hard act to follow. The horn-fueled disco pleasure band is just as aesthetically minded as Radiation City, it's just that their world feels less like a David Lynch movie and more like an orgy. RW

MONDAY 12/31

See our overstuffed New Year's Eve rundown, and Destination Fun.

TUESDAY 1/1

You did just fine, kiddo. Be good to yourself today.

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