LIFESAVAS Doug Fir, 7/20

WEDNESDAY 7/17

THE POSTAL SERVICE, BIG FREEDIA
(Rose Garden, 1 Center Ct) See My, What a Busy Week!

GRAND LAKE ISLANDS, NORTHERN CURRENTS, STEPHEN AGUSTIN AND THE FOURTH WALL
(Kelly's Olympian, 426 SW Washington) Since migrating to Portland from Brooklyn in 2012 with his Grand Lake Islands moniker in tow, Erik Emanuelson has trudged to intimate shows in unlikely venues with little more than a quiver of expansive folk compositions and a guitar. Considering he ditched a full-time job as an English teacher to hawk his wares out west, it's understandable he'd want to hit the ground running. Smartly, he brought a finished recording along with him, and after almost a year, Emanuelson's recruited a regular band, featuring members of Harlowe and the Great North Woods. The pressing of the EP, Wake of Waking, was just successfully crowd-source funded; its understated instrumentation of piano, lap steel, mandolin, and lots of choir-like melodies is buoyed by Emanuelson's quavering vocals and lyrical phrasing. RYAN J. PRADO

THURSDAY 7/18

"WEIRD AL" YANKOVIC
(Oregon Zoo, 4001 SW Canyon) See My, What a Busy Week!, and read our interview with "Weird Al" Yankovic.

HOUNDSTOOTH, PEARLY GATE MUSIC
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Read our article on Houndstooth.

PORTUGAL. THE MAN, AVI BUFFALO
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) Read our article on Portugal. The Man.

BLACK FLAG, GOOD FOR YOU, PIGGY
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) Read our article on Black Flag.

ACxDC, RAW NERVES, HONDURAN, CLOSET CASE, RKC
(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) You're going to want to get to Slabtown early for this show from LA's ACxDC (short for Antichrist Demoncore). The two local hardcore bands sharing the bill, Honduran and Raw Nerves, have become staples in the Portland scene in recent years and both bands are putting out new music this month. Raw Nerves celebrate their four-song release Futile Efforts tonight, while Honduran will unleash their full-length Street Eagles on July 30 via local label Eolian Empire. Honduran are a powerviolence three-piece that create a whirlwind of noise. Drummer Kevin Spafford, who must have studied under Animal at the Muppets' chapter of School of Rock, takes on a Vishnu-like form as the band pummels through a jam-packed set of blistering songs. If preview tracks and Honduran's increasingly mesmerizing live shows are any indication, Street Eagles should shape up to be one of the better heavy albums of the summer. CHIPP TERWILLIGER

ROGUE WAVE, HEY MARSEILLES
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Rogue Wave make unfussy power pop in the same vein as Nada Surf—loved by many, but forgettable to some. But you really can't slight good popsmithing, and Zach Rogue has been doing it for the better part of a decade. The Oakland band's latest album, Nightingale Floors, continues their expertise in jangly indie rock, relying on the tried-and-true pairing of sunny strums and sad-sack lyrics. When Rogue Wave does it, they just seem to do it better than others, and make it come across naturally. The first time I saw Rogue Wave was nine years ago in a shoebox of a venue, but even then their songs seemed to be bursting for the arena. They've come a long way, which proves a good pop song always wins. MARK LORE

THE GRANDMOTHERS OF INVENTION
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Frank Zappa's Mothers of Invention were some of rock's most outré freaks of the super-freaky '60s and '70s. Some folks will never tire of reliving those memories of wild-haired shenanigans where weird rock sweatily embraced political and cultural satire. Which brings us to the Grandmothers of Invention. Now featuring keyboard wizard Don Preston and vocalist/saxophonist/flautist Napoleon Murphy Brock, GOI will perform One Size Fits All in its entirety, plus favorites from Bongo Fury, Overnite Sensation, Uncle Meat, Roxy & Elsewhere, and We're Only in It for the Money. Zappa's been dead for two decades, but if you want the best live representation of his classic tunes now, go see GOI. (By the way, check out Sub Rosa's recent archival dig of Preston's innovative keyboard work, Filters, Oscillators & Envelopes 1967-75.) DAVE SEGAL

FRIDAY 7/19

PDX POP NOW!
(SE Salmon & Water) Read our feature on PDX Pop Now! and see My, What a Busy Week!

CATHEDRAL PARK JAZZ FESTIVAL: NORMAN SYLVESTER, ROSELAND HUNTERS, TRANSCENDENTAL BRASS BAND, & MORE
(Cathedral Park, N Edison & Pittsburg) See My, What a Busy Week!

JOHN MAYER, PHILLIP PHILLIPS
(Sleep Country Amphitheater, 17200 NE Delfel, Ridgefield WA) John Mayer's "Say"—the schlocky ballad the singer/songwriter/skeeveball wrote for that cinematic dud The Bucket List, and which has lived an unnaturally long life in Hallmark ads and dentists' offices since—has got to be the most tepid, worthless piece of musical diarrhea ever committed to tape. Building off the endlessly repeated refrain, "say what you need to say," its trite lyrics are vague to the point of meaninglessness. Its feather-light, adult-contempo arrangement is similarly offensive in its inoffensiveness—it's the equivalent of Mayer squeezing out a silent fart in a crowded elevator, hoping no one will notice—but good lord, it stinks to unholy heights. This is a song unsuitable for weddings, children, or operating heavy machinery. It was designed to deliberately, cruelly chip away at the listener's well-being. The next time you hear it in the grocery aisle, complain to the store manager. There's no reason we need to put up with Mayer's shit for another second. NED LANNAMANN

DANAVA, LECHEROUS GAZE, LONG KNIFE, DJ DENNIS DREAD
(Ash Street Saloon, 225 SW Ash) You know that weathered, grizzled, greasy, long-haired rocker standing outside of the show smoking cigarettes and staring into space like he knows something you don't? If you handed that guy a microphone and a guitar, then scraped some band members out of the gutter for him, Lecherous Gaze would be the result. Equal parts punk and good ol' rock 'n' roll, Lecherous Gaze kicks it out like the Dead Boys and MC5. The guitar solos and bass lines scream Back in the USA, while the vocals sound like someone choking Stiv Bators. Basically, Lecherous Gaze plays old-fashioned rock 'n' roll that has a real bad attitude. ARIS WALES

JOYCE MANOR, MERRY CHRISTMAS, LEE COREY OSWALD
(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) When I first wrote about LA heartthrobs Joyce Manor, it was for a relatively inglorious show they played at a bookstore. That was a little over a year ago, and quite a bit has changed since then: In the winter, Joyce Manor embarked on an East Coast tour with Desaparecidos, on which Conor Oberst joined the band onstage for their signature song, "Constant Headache." While a new release from the band would absolutely be welcomed, their self-titled debut is a perennial pop-punk (with a huge emphasis on the "pop") classic that I still bump constantly. Its follow-up, Of All Things I Will Soon Grow Tired, is less consistent but still wholly enjoyable. So far, Joyce Manor have proven to be a band that can do little wrong. All we can do is hope they keep it up. MORGAN TROPER

SOMETIMES A GREAT NOTION FESTIVAL: PINK SKULL, DAS FLUFF, WHITE FANG, PULSE EMITTER, PINKS QUIETER
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Sean Hocking started his Metal Postcard Records label in Sydney, Australia, then moved it to New York before finally ending up in Hong Kong. Lately he's taken an interest in Portland, and the label's second Sometimes a Great Notion festival kicks off this weekend. Headlined by Pink Skulls and Das Fluff, Friday's lineup features alternative takes on electronic music, complemented by locals Pinks Quieter, Pulse Emitter, and garage-rock shit-kickers White Fang. Saturday night's wide-ranging lineup includes Ken Stringfellow (the Pogues and sometimes REM member), Seattle heavy-hippie group Rose Windows, alt-country from the Maldives, and local songwriter Matthew Heller. MATT SULLIVAN

BIG FREEDIA, DJ BEYONDA
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) If you're in the mood for a string quartet and mild head bobbing, I'd recommend you NOT see Big Freedia. Freedia is the gender-straddling purveyor of the popular New Orleans booty-thrusting dance music aptly named "bounce," not for the faint of heart or light of rear. A repetitious and fast off-shoot of hiphop, bounce has been captivating the booties of New Orleans with its Mardi Gras-style chants since the '91 hit "Where Dey At" by MC T. Tucker. Now the current standard-bearer of bounce, Big Freedia brings color, class, and style to a genre most associated with ogling bouncing women. I wouldn't recommend listening to Freedia while studying for an exam or reading the Quran, but she and her back-up dancers will undoubtedly wow you, especially if you missed her opening for the Postal Service at the Rose Garden. (I know, WTF?) ROSE FINN

HAUSU, SATAN WRIDERS, CELLMATE
(Record Room, 8 NE Killingsworth) I didn't have a chance to hear Hausu's beautifully weird debut album, Total, until it was released right in the middle of their recent month-long tour. It grew on me pretty quick after repeated listens, so it's great to have them back home and playing all over town again (you can catch them at tonight's intimate Record Room show and Saturday night at PDX Pop Now!). The gnarled, distorted, cranked-up guitar work and desperate vocals on tracks like "Gardenia" and "Chrysanthemum" are going to work their way into plenty of my summer-fading-to-fall playlists a couple months down the road. Tonight's show should also have a bit of a season's change feeling, as Stockton, California's Satan Wriders' lo-fi and carefree sunny rock songs fade with the day and make way for Hausu's fresh, chilling, and dark blend of post-punk. CT

SATURDAY 7/20

PDX POP NOW!
(SE Salmon & Water) Read our feature on PDX Pop Now! and see My, What a Busy Week!

8 TRACK RELAY: MENOMENA, BLITZEN TRAPPER, THE CAVE SINGERS, NURSES, THEE SATISFACTION, QUASI, & MORE
(Portland International Raceway, 1940 N Victory) See My, What a Busy Week!

BUSTIN' SURFBOARDS: DAVIE ALLEN, GUANTANAMO BAYWATCH, ADIOS AMIGOS, THE PROTONS, DJ DANNY DODGE
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) See My, What a Busy Week!

CATHEDRAL PARK JAZZ FESTIVAL: CHUCK ISRAEL'S JAZZ ORCHESTRA, STAN BOCK AND THE NEW TRADITION, TRIO FLUX, & MORE
(Cathedral Park, N Edison & Pittsburg) See My, What a Busy Week!

SOMETIMES A GREAT NOTION FESTIVAL: ROSE WINDOWS, KEN STRINGFELLOW, CAMBODIAN SPACE PROJECT, THE MALDIVES, MATTHEW HELLER
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See Friday's listing.

BIG STAR: NOTHING CAN HURT ME SCREENING: KEN STRINGFELLOW AND SPECIAL GUESTS
(Hollywood Theatre, 4122 NE Sandy) See Film Shorts.

LIFESAVAS, TxE
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Ten years ago, Lifesavas released their first album, Spirit in Stone, and it remains a high-water mark of Portland hiphop. At the CD release party back in '03, the trio of Vursatyl, Jumbo, and Rev. Shines packed the Roseland to capacity, and it felt for a moment like Portland—along with its fertile but ultimately not particularly diverse music scene—might have more to offer the world than white guys toting guitars. Spirit in Stone was a deep, thought-provoking album that didn't dwell in darkness; it touched upon important themes without capsizing under its own weight, and fittingly for Portland, its hooks and beats were suited equally for both the club and the coffee shop. The Portland hiphop scene arguably hasn't topped that moment, and while Lifesavas have given the world so much more than that just that one sparkling record (such as 2007's Lifesavas joint Gutterfly and a number of solo projects), they've been absent from the scene as of late. Tonight they celebrate Spirit's 10th anniversary, and with the promise of another Lifesavas record—tentatively called IDentifi—on the way, it's looking like Portland hiphop still has a rich future ahead of it. NL

CENTAURPALOOZA: AVENUE VICTOR HUGO, STEAK KNIFE, PITCHFORK MOTORWAY, THE COOL WHIPS, THE SUICIDE NOTES, THE SATIN CHAPS, & MORE
(Centaur Guitar, 2833 NE Sandy & Katie O'Brien's, 2809 NE Sandy) The parking lot of Centaur Guitar is once again undergoing its yearly transformation from ho-hum asphalt wasteland to stomping grounds for rockers of every creed. Featuring a stupefying number of bands, this year's Centaurpalooza spills over into neighboring bar Katie O'Brien's. None of this affects the price of admission: totally free. Genres be damned here; acts as diverse as the Satin Chaps, the Decliners, Big Foot Dick, Bitch School, and the Last Regiment of Syncopated Drummers all have a turn at the stage. It's unfortunate that the fest's dates coincide with those of PDX Pop Now! this year, but any port in a storm, right? RJP

SAM HUMANS, THE WEAK KNEES, DINOSAUR HEART
(The Foggy Notion, 3416 N Lombard) Portland jangle-art-rock band the Weak Knees release their very impressive second album, Until You Can (They Will Tell You You Can't), at their record release show tonight. The four-piece combines tropical guitar, danceable new-wave rhythms, and a left-of-center artiness, coming up with a familiar-sounding yet durably intriguing combination. The band's original modus operandi was "Motown meets Modest Mouse," and traces of those elements remain in the Weak Knees' sound—Modest Mouse in the thickly tangled guitars and the inversion of typical rock pomp, and Motown in the crisp songwriting and effervescence of sound. Until You Can is a solid album from front to back, and the turmoil caused by recent lineup changes within the band is hard to locate in the band's confident, carefully assembled songs. NL

SIX FEET UNDER, DECREPIT BIRTH, CANNABIS CORPSE, ABIOTIC
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) If you locked a metalhead and a hippie in a room together, they could probably see eye to eye on two things: long hair and weed. Tonight's bill is proof positive that heshers like their greens, and I'm not just talking about Chris Barnes and his support of marijuana law reform. The band with the squintiest red eyes tonight could be Cannabis Corpse. Don't be fooled by their moniker—while it may make them sound like some goofy Cannibal Corpse cover band that changes the lyrics to be about weed, rest assured only part of that observation is correct. They most definitely sing about weed, but these songs are wholly original, and brutal like it's 1992 in Florida when death metal was king. They even pay homage to the likes of Cannibal Corpse and Deicide with tongue-in-cheek song titles like "Tube of the Resinated" and "Lunatic of Pot's Creation." AW

PORCHLIGHT: THE SONGS OF BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN: HOLCOMBE WALLER, RACHEL TAYLOR BROWN, CASEY NEILL, & MORE
(Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, 147 NW 19th) There's no shortage of free live music this weekend, but here's another worthy choice: a tribute to Bruce Springsteen, performed by a diverse group of Portland musicians on the steps of Northwest's Trinity Episcopal Cathedral as the sun sets and the evening slowly cools off. To fit in with the churchy setting, the show is meant to focus on Springsteen's spiritual side, but that more or less includes every song he ever wrote. Musicians like Holcombe Waller and Rachel Taylor Brown will be among those interpreting the Boss, and while the show is free, any donations will go to Trinity's hunger programs. NL

SUNDAY 7/21

PDX POP NOW!
(SE Salmon & Water) Read our feature on PDX Pop Now! and see My, What a Busy Week!

CATHEDRAL PARK JAZZ FESTIVAL: BLUE CRANES, VENTURA TRIO, ERI YAMAMOTO TRIO, JESSIE MARQUES, & MORE
(Cathedral Park, N Edison & Pittsburg) See My, What a Busy Week!

LECHEROUS GAZE, SONS OF HUNS, ACID WASH
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) See Friday's listing.

CENTAURPALOOZA: THE LAST REGIMENT OF SYNCOPATED DRUMMERS, IN TROUBLE, TOY, THE HALOGENS, BUTTERCUP, & MORE
(Centaur Guitar, 2833 NE Sandy) See Saturday's listing.

PETER MURPHY, OURS
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) Peter Murphy—the Subaru Forester-driving Godfather of Goth—has pretty much beat his recent methamphetamine possession and DUI charges, stemming from a hit-and-run accident in Glendale, California, and is out on the road with his "Mr. Moonlight Tour." Don't expect any solo songs from the high-cheekboned King of Gloom—Murphy will perform 100 percent from the Bauhaus catalog. No other members of Bauhaus will perform with him, but expect rivers of mascara-soaked goth tears to flow anyway when Murphy croons the infamous 1979 hit "Bela Lugosi's Dead." KELLY O

DESSA, SIMS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) The only female member of Minneapolis rap collective Doomtree since their first release, False Hopes, Dessa has always stood out from her peers with her poetic, spoken-word rap style. On her latest solo effort, Parts of Speech, she indulges further in the singing and songwriting abilities she often hinted at in her past solo material and work with supergroup Gayngs, but wisely spares any acoustic cheesiness by sticking to her tried-and-true in-house producers Paper Tiger and Lazerbeak. Even the softer songs still manage to hit hard, Dessa's lyrics taking focus when the beats thin out. There's definitely an art-house element to it all, but it should go over well in a live setting with a crowd that's been down with Doomtree since their backpack glory days. MIKE RAMOS

CANDLEBOX
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) Rock historians love to talk about how Nirvana "rescued" us from the music drought of the '80s. Candlebox—and pretty much every other post-Nevermind group that self-identified as grunge—are proof that those people are stupid. The mainstream's acceptance of Nirvana and grunge merely blazed a trail for an abhorrent new species of rock to follow, one that proved far more regrettable and enduring than any offshoot it succeeded (see also: Creed). Nirvana didn't save rock 'n' roll. Their popularity merely persuaded hair metal bands who missed the party to revise their aesthetic. And Candlebox are the most offensive of the bunch; "You" remains one of the worst songs I've ever heard. In my entire life. Courtney didn't kill Kurt—bands like Candlebox did. MT

MONDAY 7/22

HEARTLESS BASTARDS, WRITER
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) The Austin-based Heartless Bastards' name can be misleading. No, they are not a bunch of punk-rock motorcycle dudes, although a similar energy is certainly present. Their guttural, multi-dimensional, rock 'n' roll sound is characterized by lead singer Erika Wennerstrom's throaty, full-bodied vocals. The band is in Portland in support of their stunning fourth record, The Arrow, their first time back since playing Pickathon last summer. Each of their songs—whether they include finger picking or full-on guitar shredding—is a dynamic, expressive piece of work that pulls on your heartstrings. RACHEL MILBAUER

BRUNO MARS, ELLIE GOULDING
(Rose Garden, 1 Center Ct) I'm actually surprised one of my female relatives "of a certain age" has not emailed me a Bruno Mars video with the subject line "ADORABLE!" because he's totally the kind of non-threatening pop-star/male human that aunts and grandmothers can get behind. Mars churns out music for the mainest of streams—think an Old Navy commercial for a bikini meets a Target commercial for a hot-pink blender. Now, Ellie Goulding is also pop, but she's got more sparkle and dramatic flair to her. Her newest album, Halcyon, is almost entirely about breakups, but has that powerful "I'M SAD BUT DEALING" punch of La Roux or Florence + the Machine, with Skrillexesque (say it fast) electronic backbone. EMILY NOKES Also see My, What a Busy Week!

TUESDAY 7/23

GRAND LAKE ISLANDS, DYLAN PRATT, ROBIN BACIOR
(The Waypost, 3120 N Williams) See Wednesday's listing.