Solidarity with Charlottesville Jessica Kourkounis / Stringer / Getty images

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 16

Brown Girl Rise Fundraiser
Twice a month Black and Brown girls come together to learn about social justice, health, and culture with the new group, Brown Girl Rise. This fundraiser is crucial to their success and will benefit their first three modules about radical beauty, food and farming, and folk medicine. Church will donate 100 percent of sales. Church, 2600 NE Sandy, 4-10 pm, $5-10 suggested donation


THURSDAY, AUGUST 17

Rally Against Transgender Employment Discrimination
Activists are calling on the Bureau of Labor and Industry to establish policies to adequately advocate for transgender workers. Among their demands are training programs for employers and equal treatment in hiring, retention, and promotion practices for trans people. Trans Marxist feminist Alyssa Pariah will speak at the rally. Bureau of Labor and Industry, 800 NE Oregon, 11:30 am-1:30 pm, FREE


FRIDAY, AUGUST 18

Eclipse Hate: Solidarity with Charlottesville
Portland’s Resistance will lead a non-violent march in solidarity with the community and victims of Charlottesville. As millions of tourists flock to the Pacific Northwest to see the solar eclipse, the rally will center itself on eclipsing hate. Salmon Street Fountain, 1020 SW Naito, 5:30-8 pm, FREE

Economic Development Committee Meeting
NAACP Portland will share ways they’re supporting people-of-color-owned businesses to address economic disparities. Concordia University Library, 2800 NE Liberty, 6-7:15 pm, FREE

Screening: Whose Streets?
The police killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown sparked a street movement that started with the community of Ferguson and spread throughout the nation. Whose Streets? is the directional debut of Sabaah Folayan, an award-winning storyteller from South Central LA, and has been dubbed “a people’s documentary.” Viewing times through August 24. See review, this issue. Cinema 21, 616 NW 21st, various times, $6.50-9.50; Hollywood Theatre, 4122 NE Sandy, various times, $7-9


SATURDAY, AUGUST 19

Bystander Intervention Workshop
In the face of violent threats, it’s hard to know what to do. This workshop series was started as a response to the tragic MAX station stabbings earlier this year and is led by Teressa Raiford, Lara Jones, and Hanna Davis. Together, they seek to equip attendees with the skills needed to reduce harm for those most vulnerable while keeping everyone else safe. Donations benefit Don’t Shoot Portland. Taborspace, 5441 SE Belmont, 9 am-noon, $20+ suggested donation

Hungry for Art
Have you ever wanted a painting of a dancing trio of hot dogs? You might be able to snag just that at the third annual Hungry for Art fundraiser. This food-themed art show raises money to keep local public school art programs alive. N.W.I.P.A., 6350 SE Foster, 8 pm-midnight, FREE

A Benefit in Solidarity with Charlottesville
Portland artists and musicians will provide an evening of support, education, and performance through poetry, music, videos, and more. This event hosted by Portland ABC will benefit victims of the Charlottesville resistance and local political prisoners. Black Water Bar, 835 NE Broadway, 8-11 pm, $5

The KBOO Book and Record Sale
Browse through economically priced stacks of vinyl, books, and more at this fundraiser benefiting independent media. Sip on cider and walk away with new treasures. The entirety of sales will be donated to grassroots community radio station KBOO. Cider Riot, 807 NE Couch, noon-6 pm, FREE


SUNDAY, AUGUST 20

WALK with Refugees and Immigrants
Parks for New Portlanders is a city-led program created to provide immigrant and refugee communities with recreational activities. They’ve organized this one-mile walk in partnership with Sunday Parkways and will provide music, food, family activities, and a platform for refugees and immigrants to tell their stories. Open to all ages and backgrounds. East Portland Neighborhood Office, 1017 NE 117th, 11 am-2 pm, FREE

Stop Police Brutality: Am I Next?
This peaceful protest opposing police brutality will be led by Philip Wolfe, a deaf activist serving his second term as commissioner for Portland Commission on Disability. As a survivor of police brutality, Wolfe invites community members to march and hold vigil for civilians who have been killed by the police. Wear black, red, and gray clothing for unity and leave any weapons at home. Terry D. Schrunk Plaza, 364 SW Madison, 6-9 pm, FREE


TUESDAY, AUGUST 22

Faith & Why Unions Matter
Think labor unions are obsolete? Think again. While unions are relevant to all workers, this panel will focus on the role that faith-based communities have played in supporting safe working conditions, social services, and worker rights. Light refreshments provided. St. Philip Neri Catholic Church, 2408 SE 16th, 7-9 pm, FREE



VOLUNTEER SPOTLIGHT

Impact NW’s SHINE Program
To combat poverty in Southeast Portland, four neighborhoods came together to form Impact NW in 1966. The organization has expanded dramatically and now serves 36,000 people annually and provide a wide variety of services to children, families, seniors, and adults with disabilities. The SHINE program provides after-school and summer classes at several schools and is gearing up for the upcoming school year.
Opportunities: Instructor positions to lead classes on physical activity, arts, crafts, electronics, tech, coding, journalism, and more. Bilingual in Spanish and English a plus.
Typical commitment: One hour per week preferred. Next session starts October 2 and schedules will be finalized by September 1, so reach out soon.