"I wrote to the Mercury, and every news outlet I could get a hold of, I canceled some of my work day to make a lot of noise about, primarily, Just Out speaking out, supposedly, on behalf of the gay community," says Richard Ludt (left), a massage therapist. "The Just Out position was a personal decision taken quickly, and if we'd just sat on this a little longer we could have decided as an entire city, as an entire group that that publication is supposed to represent."
a9df/1232663908-richardludt.jpg
"Until Sam Adams is proven to have broken the law, he has my support as the best man for the job," Ludt continues. "To me, it's called into question what's an acceptable lie—I don't know the answer to that. But my father was 28 years older than my mother, who was 20 when they got married, and he was an upstanding citizen."

Ludt has called Just Out and asked that his classified ads be removed from the publication. "I'm still waiting for them to respond, as I wish [Just Out editor] Marty [Davis] had done, before taking this position," he says.

"I'm really angry at Sam," Ludt continues. I think it was a very poor choice. But I've made poor choices myself, and I've grown from them, I'm hoping it'll help him to really grown, and lead this city."

Also outside city hall, Emily Betterncourt (right, with Bible) and Sarah Reif were arguing with another man, who also held a bible. He declined to be named. "How old are you?" the man asked Bettencourt. "I'm 18," she said.
1084/1232664086-bettencourtreif.jpg

Another man held a sign on the street corner, reading "No Change=No Change. Adams Should Resign." Meanwhile inside, the city council, minus Adams, was continuing to work on passing ordinances. Commissioner Nick Fish said Portland has always been very strict in its demands of athletes "both on and off the court," in voting to name a dock after former Portland Trailblazer Kevin Duckworth. Next, City Auditor Gary Blackmer told council "we do have to budget for unanticipated elections," before council voted to pass an ordinance allotting $50,000 in public financing per candidate for an upcoming special election for his seat. Both remarks were delivered absolutely straight-faced.