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I love a good debate, and it seems I've struck a nerve with my review of FIN. (Huzzah!)

Which is all to say the biggest disappointment of a trip beneath FIN's waters is that it's over much too soon, and the pleasure of taking the journey costs a tad more than one might hope. It's a problem that could be remedied by FIN's kitchen nailing every single dish, and maybe placing the onus of enjoyment on the diner. It would behoove FIN's bright and helpful servers to add one more guideline at the beginning of the meal: Savor it.

One of the reasons it may feel like the price is "a tad more than one might hope" is due to the fact servers say the plates are meant for sharing. When many of those dishes arrive, you may look at the amount on the plate, remember the price, and prepare to knife-fight your table mates for the single bite you're likely to get. What makes this even more frustrating is that the dishes are actually very good with very few exceptions.

Yes, it's seafood. Seafood depends on market prices; they will fluctuate (an oyster dish increased by $2 between two of my dinners there). Yes, it's a "special occasion" place, which means you will likely expect to spend more. Yes, it's waaay cheaper than similar joints in bigger cities.

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So, am I being unreasonable by suggesting for the price on their menu, FIN should be sending out a perfectly prepared dish every damn time? Am I being unreasonable suggesting diners at FIN should be ready to accept the burden of savoring their meal and getting every pennies worth of enjoyment from it?

Tell me, Blogtownies, how does the cost/ratio/flavor thing break down for you? Are we a "backwater cheapskates" [thanks for letting me quote you out of context Spartacus!] that expect too much for too little? Discuss.