CHILI JAMBOREE: BLACK PRAIRIE, HOOK AND ANCHOR, THE EARNEST LOVERS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) For our second-annual Chili Jamboree, the Mercury's lined up 12 of the city's finest chefs, who'll take their best crack at that most patriotic of stews. You like a con carne? You got it. Sin carne more your speed? No sweat. Actually, gallons of spice-induced sweat. Chili Jam doesn't half step. DIRK VANDERHART See our Chili Jam feature.


RYAN ADAMS, AMY MILLER
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) Read our article on Ryan Adams.


DEAF WISH, COMM, DARK/LIGHT
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) When you live far away from Melbourne, Australia, it can be easy to forget that one of the world's finest music scenes simmers there (despite the tireless efforts of Nick Cave). Even so, it feels like there are a lot of great artists making their way stateside from Melbourne: Dick Diver, Scott and Charlene's Wedding, the great Courtney Barnett, and now Sub Pop's latest discovery, Deaf Wish. Next week, the Seattle super-indie will release the quartet's North American debut, a four-song single called "St. Vincent's," which finds the band veering back and forth between noisy, dead-eyed post-punk and a slightly more approachable, Pavement-y brand of jangle-rock. The whole thing is dipped in hiss and echo and slathered in sneer, a glorious monument to the irascible power of the electric guitar. BEN SALMON


LINDSAY CLARK, KEVIN LEE FLORENCE, RYAN FRANCESCONI, MIRABAI PEART
(The Secret Society, 116 NE Russell) Lindsay Clark has prepped her third album, Begin, and it's a gentle, graceful recording from the Portland singer/songwriter. Recorded in her Victorian house with Musée Mécanique's Sean Ogilvie, it is a perfect album, fittingly, for listening to around the house, preferably on cool, smoky mornings when the sun can't make up its mind if it wants to poke its way through the clouds. Clark's careful voice is multi-tracked on many of Begin's songs ("Robin Song" and "I Give" are entirely a cappella), but there's also a warm, cabin-like feeling of community and collaboration, with contributions from violinist Mirabai Peart, upright bassist Willem Joersz, and Quiet Life drummer Ryan Spellman. NED LANNAMANN


THE BODY, SANDWORM, RABBITS, HANG THE OLD YEAR
(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) On their new split LP for Thrill Jockey, the Body and Sandworm take two very different paths to the same dark place. The former—originally from Providence, now based in Portland—uses its side to explore a 16-minute expanse of heavy, disorienting noise, where soul-shuddering guitars rumble across lurching inhuman rhythms, and disembodied howls float through a wall of harsh noise. (In other words, it's the Body being the Body!) On the flip, Providence's Sandworm blasts through 10 tracks of bone-jarring, blackened punk. The duo's song structures are more traditionally rock 'n' roll (a nice contrast to the Body's terror-sprawl), but the vocals are shredded beyond recognition. With song titles like "Only Tears" and "Black Hatred (True Hatred)," however, it seems safe to assume Sandworm shares the Body's bleak worldview. The two bands play Slabtown tonight, where they'll be joined by Portland noise-sludge specialists Rabbits, among others. BEN SALMON Also see All-Ages Action!


SEBADOH, THE PYNNACLES
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) Sebadoh have never quite gotten the respect they deserve. Despite helping define lo-fi rock music in the late '80s and writing some of the best songs of '90s indie rock, they've never graduated to legendary status like so many bands of that time period. Perhaps it's because their albums are, to the casual listener, disorienting collections that mix power-pop gems with minute-long slop-punk songs and tender folk ballads with careless abandon. Even on their most cohesive, and arguably greatest, album—1994's Bakesale—there's still the divide between the group's two singer/songwriters. Lou Barlow's folk-pop leanings and carefully enunciated vocals collide with Jason Loewenstein's drunken drawl and garage-rock tendencies with train-wreck intensity. If you can make it past this dichotomy, though, many amazing songs await you. JOSHUA JAMES AMBERSON