Businesses Protest Planned Downtown Bike Lane

Comments

1
Are you serious? We should postpone creating a safe infrastructure for the current levels of bikers all because "future development COULD lead to more car traffic"? The most logical northbound route, 6th avenue, is clogged with one lane of cars and two transit lanes, and soon some biker is going to get clobbered by a bus as they try to bypass the traffic jam in the left lane. City streets should be freely used by all people, not reserved as (future) parking and loading zones for a few local heavyweight businesses. You can be sure as hell I will not be stopping for food and drink at a McMenamins or GE tenant on my bike ride home now.
2
Oh, McMenamins, get a clue. (And start working on engineering some better burgers.)
3
This is totally consistant with McMenamin's "treat the customer like an asshole" business model.
4
McMenamin's doesn't get bicycle business because they're a crap franchise and they know their clients are douchebags from the suburbs.
5
Well, if they've been running three trial projects for three years without ever measuring to see if they worked or helped, McMenamin's is right - stop starting new "trials" before you finish the ones you've already started.
6
MCMENAMIN'S CAN'T SEEM TO HIRE PEOPLE THAT CAN PRODUCE QUALITY FOOD, TAKE ORDERS IN A REASONABLY TIMELY MANNER OR PROVIDE CUSTOMER SERVICE WORTH A DAMN, SO WHY SHOULD WE LISTEN TO THEM REGARDING URBAN PLANNING?
7
Actually, the most logical bike route north is 4th Ave. in the middle lane -- it's downhill so easy to keep up with motor vehicles, and the middle lane doesn't stop for those pesky pedestrians. I ride it daily on my way home.
8
"Bicycles good, everyone else baaaaaad" - typical Sarah Mirk.
9
It's true that for a lot of regular cyclists the current take-the-lane approach should work fine going northbound (usually downhill).

But a lot of people are simply not comfortable biking in the same lane with cars, and there's no reason those people shouldn't have the option of a dedicated lane.

10
"40 percent of businesses near bike corrals say they've seen an increase or strong increase in customers who are bicyclists..."

Wow. That's some amazing insight there. Maybe using a PSU student's term paper as a source isn't really the best idea.

If they put a parking garage next to a business, they would see an increase in customers who parked in that garage. If they put a bus stop next to a business, they would see an increase in customers who rode the bus. And so on, and so on...

11
McMenamins does support bike lanes and the cycling community. Our general manager Christopher Robbins’ intent in signing the Portland Business Alliance letter to the city was to garner more information as to how the proposed bike lane on 12th Ave. will work and to hopefully avoid potential dangers to cyclists.

The fear is that we will end up with another difficult intersection like the one just outside Ringlers and the Crystal Ballroom at 14th and Burnside. As many are aware, a young woman was tragically killed at 14th and Burnside -- the city’s reaction was to create a bike lane that, unfortunately, has resulted in a potentially more lethal intersection. We only ask that the city provide a more studied approach to this initiative.

Renee Rank Ignacio
McMenamins Director of Marketing
12
Encourage your customers to ride bikes.