Mayor Charlie Hales Wants to Declare A Housing State of Emergency

Comments

1
...or, the city could just get out of the way and let the market build more housing.

It's an emergency, but not enough of one that we stop requiring new housing to pour money into parking. It's an emergency, but not enough of one that we aren't trying to make it harder to build more housing through demolition fees. It's an emergency, but not enough of one that nimby's feel shame for causing it.

It is an emergency, and we have no intention of responding to it.
2
While I still have to read more on this, it seems this proposal may be a bit hasty, especially in the light of an up-coming election now that Hales faces a serious challenger.
3
BJ Cefola is a developer whose interest lies in the demolision & demise of the impoverish to benefit himself. Self-entitle east coast Massachusetts a-hole. Don't be fooled by him; trying to be clever with BS rhetoric
4
My problem with anything Hales has done so far for the homeless is that he blatantly ignores their ability, need, and right to congregate and to find safety in numbers, develop community, and reduce the shame of homelessness. Next to food and warmth this is the biggest thing for homeless. Yet he blatantly uses cops to break up and herd people like rats and I would be very surprised if any shelter which comes from this is anything short of a jail cell full of disrespectful and over controlling staff members, stifling 5 p.m. curfews, and the inability to come and go or use the facilities as needed.

We are like chickens to him; keep them warm, fed, and kept in tight little cages and we can call it humane.

Many say hobos come to Portland "because it has resources" - haha... bullshit. it is the only town you cannot find a guaranteed bed at night or a place to shower and store your stuff without giving up your whole day to be treated like shit by TPI. But if your willing to rot on a sidewalk for a year while on their waiting list then TPI will give you a year worth of free cage-like housing. No, people came here because - outside - people had autonomy and freedom to live and make connections without being herded around and controlled, something not found in other towns.

Hales fucked that all up back in 2013 with his "war on homeless"- the streets quickly became more violent and I watched people turn to drugs and stabbing each other. Now days what is left is little street gangs and tweekers downtown and some yellow tape.

Kudos Hales. Can't wait to see what you have in store for everyone....But I'll admit, this is the first time you've peeked my interest in the slightest.
5
The cheapest solution is to just buy discount airline tickets for the homeless to fly to Honolulu. Mayor Kuirk Kaldwell has just purchased hot metal shipping containers for housing to create a ghetto on Sand Island, where Americans of Japanese decent were interned during World War II. Now, there's half a dozen sewage treatment vats there, on a proposed Superfund toxic waste site, and the mayor ignores the EPA's order for him to conduct a $5M environmental impact study, before housing anyone at the camp, but at least the poor won't freeze to death in their sleep.


http://www.gmphawaii.com/ProjectGIFs/Sand_Island_WWTP.gif
6
As a homeless college graduate, married woman that is not on drugs...
There is a huge crisis across America. We have empty homes still in foreclosure, yet millions more out on the street. 50% of our kids are on food stamps and need school lunches in the summer due to the instability of housing and food.
People that are genuinely disabled fight to get SSD, while I talk to tweakers on it.
My husband is a disabled Marine Vet, that fought our Government for 10yrs just to get a lousy 20% disability rating.
We've been homeless for 3yrs 2 1/2 months now. We've had a housing grant for over 2 years. No one wants it.
There is a CRISIS in this country.
7
Yo, Big Ten -- Japanese Americans were not interned on the Hawaiian Islands.
They simply represented too much of the population to intern.
This is also one of the biggest ironies of the time, while Japanese Americans were interned, there were no acts of sabotage on the West Coast, while on the East Coast, the German and Italian Americans were not interned and there were many acts of sabotage.
Get yer facts straight.
8
Sand Island, formerly known as Quarantine Island, is a small island within the city of Honolulu, Hawaii, United States. The island lies at the entrance to Honolulu Harbor.

It was known as Quarantine Island during the nineteenth century, when it was used to quarantine ships believed to carry contagious passengers.

During World War II, Sand Island was used as an Army internment camp to house Japanese Americans as well as expatriates from Germany, Italy and other Axis countries living in Hawaii. The camp opened in December 1941, soon after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the subsequent mass arrests of civilians accused — often without evidence — of espionage or other fifth column activity. Over 600 Hawaiian residents, many of them U.S. citizens, would pass through Sand Island before it was closed in March 1943. Most of the internees had been transferred to Army and Department of Justice internment camps on the mainland beginning in February 1942; the remaining 149 were moved to the newly constructed Honouliuli Internment Camp.[1][2]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sand_Island_(Hawaii)


The Honouliuli Internment Camp, Hawaiʻi's largest and longest-operating internment camp, opened in 1943 and closed in 1946. Located near Waipahu on the island of Oʻahu, the site was designated Honouliuli National Monument by Presidential Proclamation on February 19, 2015 by President Barack Obama.[4] The internment camp held 320 internees and also became the largest prisoner of war camp in Hawai‘i with nearly 4,000 individuals being held.

Run by the U.S. Army, the camp's supervisor was Captain Siegfried Spillner.[11] The camp was constructed on 160 acres (0.65 km2) of land near Ewa and Waipahu on the island of Oahu to hold internees transferred from the soon-to-close Sand Island camp.[12] It opened in March 1943.[13] An 8-foot (2.4 m) dual barbed-wire fence enclosed the camp, and a company of military police stood guard from its eight watchtowers.[14] Of the seventeen sites that were associated with the history of internment in Hawaiʻi during World War II, the camp was the only one built specifically for prolonged detention.[6][7][8][9] The isolated location in a deep gulch led Japanese American internees to nickname it jigoku dani (地獄谷?, "hell valley").[15]

The camp was designed to hold 3,000 people. At one time it held 320 U.S. civilians.[14][16] It was divided by barbed wire into sections, intended to separate internees by gender, nationality, and military or civilian status. By August 1943, there were 160 Japanese Americans and 69 Japanese interned there, according to the report of a colonel from the Swedish Legation who inspected the camp under the Geneva Convention.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honouliuli_Internment_Camp


No Ke Ano Ahiahi
Hawaiian Style Band
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ao4OMPPAFZo
9
Sand Island, formerly known as Quarantine Island, is a small island within the city of Honolulu, Hawaii, United States. The island lies at the entrance to Honolulu Harbor.

It was known as Quarantine Island during the nineteenth century, when it was used to quarantine ships believed to carry contagious passengers.

During World War II, Sand Island was used as an Army internment camp to house Japanese Americans as well as expatriates from Germany, Italy and other Axis countries living in Hawaii. The camp opened in December 1941, soon after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the subsequent mass arrests of civilians accused — often without evidence — of espionage or other fifth column activity. Over 600 Hawaiian residents, many of them U.S. citizens, would pass through Sand Island before it was closed in March 1943. Most of the internees had been transferred to Army and Department of Justice internment camps on the mainland beginning in February 1942; the remaining 149 were moved to the newly constructed Honouliuli Internment Camp.[1][2]

Wikipedia Sand_Island_(Hawaii)


The Honouliuli Internment Camp, Hawaiʻi's largest and longest-operating internment camp, opened in 1943 and closed in 1946. Located near Waipahu on the island of Oʻahu, the site was designated Honouliuli National Monument by Presidential Proclamation on February 19, 2015 by President Barack Obama.[4] The internment camp held 320 internees and also became the largest prisoner of war camp in Hawai‘i with nearly 4,000 individuals being held.

Run by the U.S. Army, the camp's supervisor was Captain Siegfried Spillner.[11] The camp was constructed on 160 acres (0.65 km2) of land near Ewa and Waipahu on the island of Oahu to hold internees transferred from the soon-to-close Sand Island camp.[12] It opened in March 1943.[13] An 8-foot (2.4 m) dual barbed-wire fence enclosed the camp, and a company of military police stood guard from its eight watchtowers.[14] Of the seventeen sites that were associated with the history of internment in Hawaiʻi during World War II, the camp was the only one built specifically for prolonged detention.[6][7][8][9] The isolated location in a deep gulch led Japanese American internees to nickname it jigoku dani (地獄谷?, "hell valley").[15]

The camp was designed to hold 3,000 people. At one time it held 320 U.S. civilians.[14][16] It was divided by barbed wire into sections, intended to separate internees by gender, nationality, and military or civilian status. By August 1943, there were 160 Japanese Americans and 69 Japanese interned there, according to the report of a colonel from the Swedish Legation who inspected the camp under the Geneva Convention.

wikipedia.org Honouliuli_Internment_Camp


No Ke Ano Ahiahi
Hawaiian Style Band
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ao4OMPPAFZo
10
According to Wikipedia, over 600 Hawaiian residents, many of them U.S. citizens, would pass through Sand Island before it was closed in March 1943. Most of the internees had been transferred to Army and Department of Justice internment camps on the mainland beginning in February 1942; the remaining 149 were moved to the newly constructed Honouliuli Internment Camp.

The Honouliuli Internment Camp, Hawaiʻi's largest and longest-operating internment camp, opened in 1943 and closed in 1946. Located near Waipahu on the island of Oʻahu, the site was designated Honouliuli National Monument by Presidential Proclamation on February 19, 2015 by President Barack Obama. The internment camp held 320 internees and also became the largest prisoner of war camp in Hawai‘i with nearly 4,000 individuals being held.

An 8-foot dual barbed-wire fence enclosed the camp, and a company of military police stood guard from its eight watchtowers. Of the seventeen sites that were associated with the history of internment in Hawaiʻi during World War II, the camp was the only one built specifically for prolonged detention. The isolated location in a deep gulch led Japanese American internees to nickname it jigoku dani (地獄谷?, "hell valley").

The camp was designed to hold 3,000 people. At one time it held 320 U.S. civilians. It was divided by barbed wire into sections, intended to separate internees by gender, nationality, and military or civilian status. By August 1943, there were 160 Japanese Americans and 69 Japanese interned there, according to the report of a colonel from the Swedish Legation who inspected the camp under the Geneva Convention.


No Ke Ano Ahiahi
Hawaiian Style Band
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ao4OMPPAFZo
11
Somehow my response got put over in I/A and I can't repost it here, but Sand Island was a concentration camp along with at least one other one on Oahu where innocent Japanese Americans were imprisoned, same as in Vanport, where Portland Meadows and Portland International Raceway now sit.

http://www.portlandmercury.com/IAnonymousBlog/archives/2015/09/24/portland-xenophobes
12
An online encyclopedia says, that Sand Island, formerly known as Quarantine Island, is a small island within the city of Honolulu, Hawaii, United States. The island lies at the entrance to Honolulu Harbor.

It was known as Quarantine Island during the nineteenth century, when it was used to quarantine ships believed to carry contagious passengers.

During World War II, Sand Island was used as an Army internment camp to house Japanese Americans as well as expatriates from Germany, Italy and other Axis countries living in Hawaii. The camp opened in December 1941, soon after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the subsequent mass arrests of civilians accused — often without evidence — of espionage or other fifth column activity. Over 600 Hawaiian residents, many of them U.S. citizens, would pass through Sand Island before it was closed in March 1943. Most of the internees had been transferred to Army and Department of Justice internment camps on the mainland beginning in February 1942; the remaining 149 were moved to the newly constructed Honouliuli Internment Camp.

The Honouliuli Internment Camp, Hawaiʻi's largest and longest-operating internment camp, opened in 1943 and closed in 1946. Located near Waipahu on the island of Oʻahu, the site was designated Honouliuli National Monument by Presidential Proclamation on February 19, 2015 by President Barack Obama. The internment camp held 320 internees and also became the largest prisoner of war camp in Hawai‘i with nearly 4,000 individuals being held.

Run by the U.S. Army, the camp's supervisor was Captain Siegfried Spillner. The camp was constructed on 160 acres of land near Ewa and Waipahu on the island of Oahu to hold internees transferred from the soon-to-close Sand Island camp. It opened in March 1943An 8-foot dual barbed-wire fence enclosed the camp, and a company of military police stood guard from its eight watchtowers. Of the seventeen sites that were associated with the history of internment in Hawaiʻi during World War II, the camp was the only one built specifically for prolonged detention. The isolated location in a deep gulch led Japanese American internees to nickname it jigoku dani (地獄谷?, "hell valley").

The camp was designed to hold 3,000 people. At one time it held 320 U.S. civilians. It was divided by barbed wire into sections, intended to separate internees by gender, nationality, and military or civilian status. By August 1943, there were 160 Japanese Americans and 69 Japanese interned there, according to the report of a colonel from the Swedish Legation who inspected the camp under the Geneva Convention.

No Ke Ano Ahiahi
Hawaiian Style Band
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ao4OMPPAFZo
13
Dang, did you have to spam the hell out of your response?
14
This is hypocrisy, as the city refuses to back down on sweeps. Hales: "There's a housing emergency! Now hold on while I make these homeless people more homeless..." https://youtu.be/azL-inVnZdQ
15
NOW all my retries show up. Does the Merc have some sort of new time delay setting so they can censor shit now? The Editor hereby has my permission to delete the repeats.

Seriously, the Honolulu Mayor doesn't hesitate to violate the poor's Civil Rights as well as his oath of office to uphold the US Constitution, but he's afraid of being sued by other cities if he were to fly the homeless to the mainland.

The way around that is to set up a private non-profit to provide airline tickets to deport Portland's homeless to Havvai'i.