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The right-wing videographer who pulled a gun on Black Lives Matter protesters in downtown Portland last night was apparently legally allowed to carry the firearm, according to Police Chief Mike Marshman. That won't still be the case after his actions Thursday.

Marshman told the Mercury this morning he's been told that Michael Strickland, 36, possesses a concealed handgun license. A spokesperson for the Multnomah County Sheriff's Office wouldn't confirm that fact, but if true, it would allow Strickland to disregard a city law banning possession of loaded guns in public.

In footage captured last night, Strickland can be seen drawing a pistol from a holster on his right hip as he backs away from protesters, then pointing it in multiple directions, bank heist-style. The crowd quickly scrambles, and Strickland is talked down by two people.

Court documents show Strickland told law enforcement that protesters "went after him." He was released on his own recognizance, and arraigned this afternoon at 2 pm.


Update, 3:25 pm:
Prosecutors this afternoon filed two additional charges against Strickland—a pair of felony unlawful use of a weapon counts to go with misdemeanor charges of menacing and disorderly conduct in the second degree. Strickland was booked back into jail after the arraignment, and is still there as of this writing, according to online records. Bond was set at $250,000.

Original post:

Marshman said this morning he wasn't sure whether Strickland's license to carry concealed weapons would be revoked, should he be convicted of the crimes against him. "They'll probably have a hearing," the chief said.

Meanwhile, Multnomah County Sheriff's Captain Steve Alexander said that—if Strickland has a concealed carry license—a report would be issued to whichever county issued it, should he be convicted. "They review it and they can revoke it if they deem it appropriate to revoke," Alexander said.

Update, 12:55 pm: Alexander called back with new information. He says that anyone arrested with a concealed handgun license automatically loses the license, regardless of the infraction. Depending on the outcome of the case, a person can apply for the license to be reinstated, Alexander said.

"The most common thing is a DUI," he said.

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The comments came after a press conference in front of City Hall this morning, featuring Marshman and a bevy of city, county, and religious leaders.


The press conference was called at the tail end of an awful week—featuring two deeply troubling killings of black men by police officers in other states, and the killing of five officers in an organized attack last night in Dallas.

"People are feeling angst, and tension, and anger," said Bishop Steven Holt, of the Kingdom Nation Church, "and they should." He cautioned that the same anger over the deaths of black Americans at the hands of police should also be felt at other murders of black men and women. "There are going to be some people who don't like that comment," he said.

Bishop Steven Holt addresses local media this morning.
Bishop Steven Holt addresses local media this morning.

"I'm really tired of that flag being at half mast," said Mayor Charlie Hales, of a flagpole outside of City Hall. Hales has called for stricter gun controls again and again during his time in office. "This is madness and it must stop."

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The most powerful comments came from Nkenge Harmon Johnson, director of the Urban League of Portland. Harmon Johnson, who is black, explained that she's had several relatives in law enforcement, but also constantly worries that her family members will make it home safe at night.

"I understand the anger, the frustration, and the utter sadness that people are feeling in this moment," Harmon Johnson said. She decried that fact people would even need to protest or call their congressmen merely "to say, 'I have a right to be safe.'"

"It shouldn't be necessary in our country."