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Ciara Dolan

UPDATED 6:30 PM
Good news! Multiple outlets are now reporting that a federal judge has granted a temporary stoppage to Trump's plan to keep refugees from entering the country, while freeing those who are currently detained at airports, thanks to an emergency hearing brought about by the ACLU. From the New York Times:

Judge Ann M. Donnelly of Federal District Court in Brooklyn, who was nominated by former President Barack Obama, ruled just before 9 p.m. that implementing Mr. Trump’s order by sending the travelers home could cause them “irreparable harm.”

And from CNN:

Anthony D. Romero, the director of the American Civil Liberties Union, said the judge recognized the potential of harm to immigrants and visitors.
"Our courts today worked as they should as bulwarks against government abuse or unconstitutional policies and orders," he said.

Let's all pause to give a tip o' the hat to the fine folks at the ACLU—and remember them when you have some extra donation money. That being said, it's important to note that this is a temporary stay, and we can assume Trump's administration will be pushing back, and hard. So now is not the time for us to let up on the pressure.—WM. STEVEN HUMPHREY

ORIGINAL POST:
Dozens of people upset over Donald Trump's day-old executive order barring refugees and citizens from seven predominantly Muslim nations from entering the US are voicing their anger at Portland International Airport this afternoon.

Chanting "No ban, no wall, open borders for us all" the group is marching around the airport as a small number Port of Portland police look on.

Lucía Martínez, an assistant English professor at Reed College, helped organize the impromptu event. She tells the Mercury she got the idea earlier this afternoon, and tweeted out a call to action.


Reactions are mixed at PDX. Police officers on the scene say there's an ordinance against marching at the airport, but as of 4:15 pm no tickets had been issued. One officer said that could change at any moment. Airport employees seemed largely indifferent, though some noted business wasn't being affected. One traveler voiced support.










The action comes as cities around the country react in outrage to Trump's executive order, which the New York Times reports has resulted in passengers being detained at Kennedy International Airport. In response, thousands of protesters have flocked there. There have also been protests planned at airports in San Francisco and Washington, DC.

Anxiety over Trump's immigration policy hasn't been limited to airports. On Friday, word spread that US Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents have been cracking down on people in the Multnomah County Courthouse. That spurred a statement this afternoon from county officials this afternoon, including commissioners, the county's Presiding Judge Nan Waller, District Attorney Rod Underhill, and Sheriff Mike Reese.

"In the past two weeks, there has been an increase in reports of ICE activity around - and in some cases inside - the courthouse," it reads. "We do not yet know if there has been an actual increase."

The statement goes onto say that any factor that makes people (more) afraid to access the courts system is a "grave concern."

"This is devastating for the people accessing our services, and in many cases, counterproductive to a lawful community. We encourage ICE to recognize courthouses as sensitive locations and consider these impacts."

Hit the jump for the full statement.

Like many of you, late Friday we heard reports of Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers detaining people who come to the Multnomah County Circuit Court Courthouses.

We immediately reached out to court officials. In the past two weeks, there has been an increase in reports of ICE activity around - and in some cases inside - the courthouse. We do not yet know if there has been an actual increase.

Anything that increases the fear of people accessing our courts is of grave concern. Courthouses need to be safe locations for people to access justice: whether to contest an eviction, seek a restraining order from abuse, or attend a custody hearing. Now, they may be too afraid to show up.

This is devastating for the people accessing our services, and in many cases, counterproductive to a lawful community. We encourage ICE to recognize courthouses as sensitive locations and consider these impacts.

We can't have people afraid to access justice in Multnomah County.

The Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office does not give ICE officers access to areas of court facilities that are not open to the public, and does not permit ICE officers to maintain a presence in any County correctional facility. The Sheriff’s Office does not hold people in county jails on ICE detainers or conduct any immigration enforcement actions. The Board formally recognized and supported this policy with a resolution on Dec. 22, 2016.

The Multnomah County District Attorney's Office does not notify or alert immigration officials or agencies regarding individuals (witnesses, victims, or defendants) with whom we come into contact. This applies to the adult and juvenile justice systems, as well as our work seeking to enforce child support obligations.

Please contact our offices with any information. And know that we are working to support the families in our community and to provide services to all those in need.