Venus Hayes talks to reporters
Venus Hayes talks to reporters Doug Brown

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A grand jury declined yesterday to indict Portland Police Officer Andrew Hearst, who shot and killed 17-year-old Quanice Hayes last month. The teen's mother gathered with supporters and the media outside the Portland Building this morning to criticize the Portland Police Bureau (PPB) and the Multnomah County District Attorney's Office (MCDA).

"My son, Quanice Hayes, is the real victim in this situation," Venus Hayes said. "The Portland police, in cahoots with DA Don Rees and will try to paint my son—my 17-year-old child—as a robber or a car prowler, all of which is not a reason to be executed in the United States of America or in the State of Oregon."

The PPB reported that Quanice matched the description of an armed robbery suspect they were looking for in the area of NE 82nd and Hancock. A press release from the PPB yesterday after the grand jury decision said Quanice had possession of some of the stuff the robbery victim told police was stolen from him—including an Oregon Trail EBT card. Officers, the bureau says, discovered Quanice "crouching" in a nearby alcove of a house after reports of a potential break-in. He was shoot three times, twice in the chest and once in the head.

Here's the PPB's description of what happened:

Officers ordered Hayes to crawl out of the alcove, which he started to do, but then stopped and got upright on his knees. Hayes was ordered multiple times by officers to keep his hands up, but made repeated and deliberate motions with his hands to the area of his waistband and pockets. During this encounter, Officer Hearst fired three shots from his patrol rifle at Hayes, striking and killing him. After the shooting, officers approached Hayes to take him into custody and render immediate medical aid. Medical personnel arrived and determined that Hayes was deceased.
A desert tan-colored handgun was found next to Hayes on the ground. It was later determined that the handgun was a realistic-looking replica firearm.

Hearst, and others officers, did not have a body camera.

Venus Hayes, this morning, said "Quanice did not, in fact, produce a replica gun and point it at the officers.... Quanice was on his knees when he was shot in the head and chest."

She criticized the bureau's communication with her and said they lied and provided "misinformation" to her. She asked for a federal investigation.

Here's the video:

Officers ordered Hayes to crawl out of the alcove, which he started to do, but then stopped and got upright on his knees. Hayes was ordered multiple times by officers to keep his hands up, but made repeated and deliberate motions with his hands to the area of his waistband and pockets. During this encounter, Officer Hearst fired three shots from his patrol rifle at Hayes, striking and killing him. After the shooting, officers approached Hayes to take him into custody and render immediate medical aid. Medical personnel arrived and determined that Hayes was deceased.
A desert tan-colored handgun was found next to Hayes on the ground. It was later determined that the handgun was a realistic-looking replica firearm.

Hearst, and others officers, did not have a body camera.

Venus Hayes, this morning, said "Quanice did not, in fact, produce a replica gun and point it at the officers.... Quanice was on his knees when he was shot in the head and chest."

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She criticized the bureau's communication with her and said they lied and provided "misinformation" to her. She asked for a federal investigation.

Here's the video: