Comments

1
hm. gives a new meaning to the fantastic book "how to survive a robot uprising" by daniel h wilson
2
They've had these in Japan for 20 years. Nothing new here other than being on a different continent.

And I really doubt that they're more sustainable, what with all the infrastructure and upkeep and energy being spent to move all those cars around.
3
They fucking rule. Stop being a buzzkill, Graham.
4
Auto shops have used lifts for decades to save space on the lot. Interesting innovation.

I'm more concerned that it only fits 29 cars, while the building has 50 units. I bet those other tenants won't have cars.

Oh wait, yes they will, and they'll park in front of the neighbor's house.
5
They do park in front of the neighbor's house. My girlfriend lives across the street, and I always used to be able to find a spot in the 1 hour parking there. Now I rarely can, and those cars sure aren't moved after an hour.

If I had trouble finding a parking spot in my neighborhood, I would definitely be willing to pay for the privilege. Urban space is valuable, and if you don't charge for it, it often becomes scarce.

Maybe more neighborhoods should move to the model used in NW, where residents can get a parking permit, and anyone without one would be time-limited. Or install meters.
6
Portland had two "pigeon-hole parking" devices downtown in the 1950s. Required a operator, though.
7
Long-time fan, first time rant. Can't you guys afford your own moving images instead of stealing material from crappy OregonLive? I know film processing and computering are expensive, but I hear even some of those wire-less tele-phones are not able to take moving pictures WITH SOUND!

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