How to Die in Portland

Planning on Dying? Here's Everything You Need to Know.

Comments

1
A very thoughtful and interesting article. Appreciate the thought and care in educating with a realm of respect for such a sensitive subject.
2
Correction the Oregon assisted suicide policy does not provide a witness to the self administration even as it was sold that way. Likely 30% were forced euthanasia. Read the nontransparent Oregon model bill. The bill allows that one could be diagnosed and dead in 15 days with immunity for a predatory heir/new friend, all before the family knows. Poor excuse for public policy.
3
I thought this article was really well written and informative, as well as entertaining. Thank you Ciara!
4
This is one of the most informative and engaging articles I have read on the rather taboo topic of DEATH for some time. Well done Ciara for such a well thought-out exposition of death-care processes and funeral arranging for the Portland area.

Sara
US Funerals Online
5
Remember the "D" on your driver's license, permit or ID? The one that means upon your death, you wish to become a tissue, cornea & organ donor? Oregon has one of the highest rates of registered donors in the entire country - so I really hope the author follows up and completes this incomplete portrait on death by talking to our local non-profit organizations, Lions VisionGift, Community Tissue Services, or at least Donate Life Northwest. Unlike 'donating your body to science,' donating tissue and corneas is an option especially available to most people once they pass - and if more people better understood how it works, more lives would be saved and more vision restored to the blind every day. It's an incredible legacy to leave, and it'd be nice to see the Mercury help educate people about this very real and very powerful option, benignly neglected in this article.
6
Good article about a subject too rarely discussed!

An important omission, though, is that Oregon law does not give unmarried couples the same rights with regard to disposition of remains as to married couples. ORS 97.130 does, however, provide (pursuant to sections (2) and (7)) that the unmarried partner may be granted the right of disposition through a written instrument.
7
"(since buckling someone into the backseat isn’t really an option—a funeral service practitioner must direct the removal and transport of remains)"

This is inaccurate. Oregon allows individuals to act as their own funeral service practitioner. It's just an uncommon practice, not illegal.