DOUBLE LOVER “You forgot deodorant.”

AIRPORT CINEMA SHOWCASE
A screening of the locally-made shorts currently playing at Hollywood’s microcinema at the Portland Airport, including works by Dave Depper and Laura Gibson, Chris Funk and Ural Thomas, Jeff Winograd, and more. Hollywood Theatre.

BLACK PANTHER
See review, this issue. Various Theaters.

BOYZ N THE HOOD
After Boyz n the Hood blew up, its director John Singleton went on to direct a bunch of stuff: Poetic Justice, Higher Learning, Shaft, 2 Fast 2 Furious. And Boyz’ young cast—which included Ice Cube, Angela Bassett, Morris Chestnut, Laurence Fishburne, Cuba Gooding Jr., and Nia Long—went on to be part of a whopping number of notable projects. In some ways, watching these actors in a movie that’s 27 years old feels like opening up a time capsule (behold the soundtrack, which features everyone from 2 Live Crew to Tony! Toni! Toné!); in other ways, Boyz n the Hood remains as timely as it was in the ’90s. ERIK HENRIKSEN Fifth Avenue Cinema.

DOUBLE LOVER
In this campy psychosexual thriller from François Ozon, a sad lady with psychosomatic stomach problems falls in love with her therapist (let’s not), then his evil twin. What follows is a mishmash between freaky horror tropes and softcore porn, despite the film’s insistence that its heroine suffers from frigidity, which I feel contractually obligated to tell you isn’t a real condition. I also feel contractually obligated to warn you that Double Lover contains (1) multiple rape scenes, (2) a speculum shot that will make you never want to go to the gynecologist again, (3) a shameless amount of medical grossness, including a stomach critter much worse than the one in Alien, and (4) constant low-level dread. (Vive la France!) If you have problems with any of those things, don’t see Double Lover. But if you have a strong stomach, Ozon’s preposterous commitment to his absurd premise almost makes it worthwhile. MEGAN BURBANK Fox Tower 10.

DR. STRANGELOVE, OR HOW I LEARNED TO STOP WORRYING AND LOVE THE BOMB
Hey, look. A movie about Portland and fluoride. Academy Theater.

EARLY MAN
Nick Park, the man who created Wallace and Gromit, has made another original stop-motion animated film. This one’s about Stone Age tribes competing against Bronze Age snobs in what’s basically the world’s first World Cup. So yeah: A stop-motion caveman sports movie spoof starring the voices of Newt Scamander, Loki, and Arya Stark. Various Theaters.

FIFTY SHADES FREED
Thinking about how Fifty Shades Freed is just boring, latter-season Gossip Girl with nipples got me all hung up on how good Gossip Girl used to be. I’d rather re-watch that than see rich people play with butt plugs any day of the week. ELINOR JONES Various Theaters.

GABBY ANTONIO SMASHES THE IMPERIALIST, WHITE SUPREMACIST, CAPITALIST PATRIARCHY
See Film, this issue. PSU’s Smith Memorial Student Union.

THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH
Susan Compo’s new book, Earthbound: David Bowie and The Man Who Fell to Earth, goes behind the scenes of the 1976 Bowie-starring science fiction film, with a complete account of its making, from Walter Tevis’ source novel to a breakdown of the movie’s multiple edits. Tonight, the Nicolas Roeg-directed masterwork screens at the Hollywood—in its intended, full-length version—with Compo in attendance. NED LANNAMANN Hollywood Theatre.

PIPE ORGAN PICTURES: SEVEN CHANCES
Dean Lemire plays the organ while Buster Keaton dodges giant falling rocks and something like 200 crazed women as he tries to earn millions getting married by 7 pm. Seven Chances was shot in 1926, but there are stunts in this thing that would make Jackie Chan and Tom Cruise be like, “Nah buddy, that ain’t for me. You’re going to kill someone trying to get that on film.” Hollywood Theatre.

PORTLAND BLACK FILM FESTIVAL
For years, the Hollywood Theatre’s Portland Black Film Festival has brought some fantastic films to town—films from African American filmmakers, films that focus on Black lives and experiences, and films that are worth a look from everybody. The 2018 edition, curated by local comics writer, filmmaker, and educator David Walker, is no different, filling February with a wide-ranging selection of movies... and the great Joe Morton, the festival’s guest of honor. Perhaps best known from his role on Scandal and for causing the robot apocalypse in Terminator 2: Judgment Day (THANKS, JOE), Morton will be in attendance for a 35mm screening of his 1984 comedy classic Brother From Another Planet, in which “The Brother” (Morton) lands on Earth and gets an apartment in Harlem (screens Sat Feb 24). There’s a bunch of other must-see stuff too, including a showcase of shorts made by local Black filmmakers (Sun Feb 25); a screening of 1973’s The Spook Who Sat by the Door (Sat Feb 17); a tribute to filmmaker and photographer Elijah Hasan (Wed Feb 21); a screening of Charles Bradley: Soul of America (Thurs Feb 22), and more. Complete schedule at hollywoodtheatre.org. ERIK HENRIKSEN Hollywood Theatre.

PORTLAND INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL
See Film, this issue. Cinema 21, Cinemagic, Laurelhurst Theater, NW Film Center’s Whitsell Auditorium.

PURPLE RAIN
As a movie, Purple Rain isn’t much, honestly—basically a series of melodramatic (and often misogynistic) vignettes about a pouty brat (Prince) acting like a sour piece of shit to everyone in a five-mile radius (The Revolution, Apollonia) as a coping mechanism for having an abusive father (Clarence Williams III). But as a document of Prince’s talents as a musician and a live performer, (and to a lesser extent, Morris Day’s charisma and the Time’s chops), Purple Rain is like an atomic bomb powered by funk-rock fusion, whose radioactive fallout changed pop culture forever. SQUAWK! Hallelujah. BOBBY ROBERTS Clinton Street Theater.


★ MEANS WE RECOMMEND IT. Theater locations are accurate Friday, February 16-February, 22, unless otherwise noted. Movie times are updated daily and are available here.