IBEYI Thurs 11/16 Revolution Hall DAVID UZOCHUKWU

SUPER PICKS

IBEYI, THEMIND
(Revolution Hall, 1300 SE Stark) French-Cuban sisters Lisa-Kaindé and Naomi Díaz perform under the moniker Ibeyi, which comes from the Yoruba term for “twins.” In September the experimental duo released Ash, an excellent sophomore effort that melds folk with electronica, piano and cajón (a Peruvian percussion instrument) with Auto-tune, and lyrics in English, Yoruba, Spanish, and French. Ash bears witness to injustice—Naomi sings about her own experience being racially profiled by police—and tragedy, as the twins’ father, Miguel “Angá” Díaz of Buena Vista Social Club, died when they were 11, and their older sister died several years later. But it’s also full of rousing sing-along choruses and testaments to strength and rebirth, like on “Deathless,” which features saxophonist Kamasi Washington as the sisters sing, “Whatever happens, whatever happened, we are deathless.” If you’re listening to Ibeyi for the first time, also be sure to check out their videos, which are as poetic and well-executed as the music itself. In the surreal video for “Deathless,” a miniature version of Naomi emerges from Lisa-Kaindé’s dress. On opening track “I Carried This for Years,” the twins sing over a haunting, looped sample of a Bulgarian women’s choir. By remixing the folk song, they situate the sample firmly in the present and reimagine traditional music with contemporary tools. Like ashes into dust, Ibeyi’s songs come full circle. ISABEL LYNDON

PLASTIC CACTUS Tues 11/21 Mississippi Studios CLIFFORD KING

PLASTIC CACTUS, THE LONESOME BILLIES
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Plastic Cactus is just about as far removed from the desert as its name suggests. Brooke Metropulos (guitar/vocals), Michaela Gradstein (guitar/vocals), Bill Willson (bass), and Tyler Brown (drums) formed in Portland in 2016 and released their debut EP, Pricks, last April. Despite the group’s Pacific Northwest roots, its music is a collision of surf rock, spaghetti western soundtracks, outlaw country, and the dusty, rockabilly punk of the Gun Club. That’s well-trodden territory by now, but the wry lyrics, too-cool vocals, and tight melodies of Pricks make Plastic Cactus stand out in a sea of lesser bands. Opening track “Pink Void” sounds dazed, sun-drunk, and hallucinatory, while funereal “Dark and Moody” and “Ghost” feature twangy guitar riffs, skittering percussion, rumbling bass lines, and the Vivian Girls-esque harmonies of Metropulos and Gradstein. The EP’s standout, “Mum’s the Word”—which was included on this year’s PDX Pop Now! compilation—kind of sounds like the Bonanza theme song at first, but its galloping guitar riff melts into psychedelic slime as they sing, “Couldn’t speak, be heard/Keep quiet, ’cause mum’s the word/Don’t say I play well for a girl.” Pricks is a promising start for Plastic Cactus; it’s catchy, haunting, surreal, and fun. I bet they’d fit right in on bills with bigger surf bands like La Luz and Guantanamo Baywatch. Plastic Cactus is currently working on a full-length debut that’s set to come out in 2018—if they stay prickly, it could be one of the best local releases of next year. CIARA DOLAN


WEDNESDAY 11/15

HAVANIA WHAAL, SALT LICK, SMILING BETH, TOM GHOULIE
(Anarres Infoshop, 7101 N Lombard) There’s something inherently impressive about bands that have few members but still manage to produce an enormous, all-encompassing sound. Havania Whaal is one of those bands—their new album, Elaborate Minor Crisis, is dark post-punk with spaced-out, lo-fi aesthetics anchored by the dueling vocals of Noelle Magia and Paul Sobiech. But what really sets Havania Whaal apart is their ability to pull driving pop hooks from the chaos, especially on tracks like “Croissant.” DELANEY MOTTER


THURSDAY 11/16

IBEYI, THEMIND
(Revolution Hall, 1300 SE Stark) Read our Ibeyi super pick.

HAMILTON LEITHAUSER, COURTNEY MARIE ANDREWS
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Though the Walkmen have been on hiatus since 2013, frontman Hamilton Leithauser hasn’t done much laurel-resting. He’s released a solo debut (2014’s Black Hours), an LP with Walkmen guitarist Paul Maroon (2015’s Dear God), an EP (2015’s I Could Have Sworn), and a collaborative LP with Rostam (2016’s I Had a Dream That You Were Mine). But Leithauser’s most successful solo work is his new single with Angel Olsen, “Heartstruck (Wild Hunger),” which expands the vintage pop sounds of I Had a Dream with sweeping strings and staccato piano. It’s the kind of smoldering duet that could’ve time-travelled from the 1960s—Leithauser sounds like he’s getting the wind knocked out of him each time the chorus rolls around, while Olsen’s powerful vibrato squeaks and flutters in the background. Everything she touches turns to gold, which is largely why this song is so damn good. But here’s hoping Leithauser sticks with these throwback pop sounds on his next album. CIARA DOLAN


FRIDAY 11/17

GOLDEN RETRIEVER, CHARLIE MOSES, PAPER GATES
(The Fixin’ To, 8218 N Lombard) Tonight Charlie Moses celebrates the tape release of her new album, Figurine, which charges indie-pop melodies with the energy of lush strings, saxophone, and warm jazz progressions. Moses’ silky voice runs cool and smooth through the cinematic “Mother Mary,” and turns the Electric Prunes’ “Onie” into a psychedelic lullaby. Though parts of Figurine sound a bit too twee, tracks like “Flooded” prove Charlie Moses’ ability to approach songwriting like a musical architect. CD

KHRUANGBIN Fri 11/17 Wonder Ballroom MARY KANG

CHICANO BATMAN, KHRUANGBIN, THE SHACKS
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Los Angeles-based Chicano Batman have been picking up steam over the past couple of years, finding an increasingly larger audience for their cosmopolitan funk-rock ’n’ soul. That’s why they’ve gone from playing the Doug Fir in 2016 to the Star Theater in February to the Wonder Ballroom on this tour stop. They’re fun! And people love fun. But in your rush to see the next big thing, don’t miss opening act Khruangbin, a Texas trio inspired by cassettes of obscure Thai funk from the 1960s and ’70s. On its newest album, The Universe Smiles Upon You, Khruangbin—the name means “engine fly” in Thai—effortlessly unspools a unique blend of psychedelic soul, low-key funk, reverberant surf rock, spacious pop, and spaced-out twang. BEN SALMON


SATURDAY 11/18

RADIATOR HOSPITAL, GOOD SIGN, BAD SLEEP
(High Water Mark, 6800 NE MLK) As a prolific member of both the Grand Rapids and Philadelphia DIY scenes, Sam Cook-Parrott has been churning out vibrant and heartfelt power-pop gems under the Radiator Hospital moniker for the better part of a decade. Tonight the band’s latest, Play The Songs You Like, brings them out west for a rare Portland show that’s guaranteed to have you hanging on every word and grinning from ear to ear. CHIPP TERWILLIGER

OREGON SYMPHONY, ST. LAWRENCE STRING QUARTET
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) Nearly 200 years after Beethoven’s death, it remains truly astounding that history’s greatest composer couldn’t hear a damn thing for much of his life. Can you imagine a blind painter or a chef with no sense of smell reaching similar artistic heights? Beethoven’s Symphony No. 2 was written while the young composer still had some of his hearing left but had entered a deep depression upon learning he would soon be fully deaf with no chance of recovery. In that sense, it should be seen as a definitive statement—a triumphant farewell to the world of sound, with all the grandeur and drama of which Beethoven was capable. That he would later top himself several times over with subsequent work means the Second has languished in relative obscurity, but its pleasures, from its gorgeous second movement to the playful agility of its fourth, should be evaluated on their own terms. The symphony, a high-water mark of the classical era, is counterbalanced by Hindemith’s Symphonic Metamorphosis of Themes by Carl Maria von Weber and John Adams’ Absolute Jest, a concerto/string-quartet hybrid heavily influenced by Beethoven, featuring the esteemed St. Lawrence String Quartet from Canada. NED LANNAMANN

CITIZEN, SORORITY NOISE, GREAT GRANDPA
(Analog Café, 720 SE Hawthorne) Right before I started writing this, I finished reading yet another article about how rock ’n’ roll is dead in the age of pop-star ubiquity, hip-hop’s chart dominance, and electro-everything. And if your perspective stops at Billboard’s rock charts, it’s true—rock ’n’ roll is looking pretty sickly. But every week, a gaggle of good underground bands tour through Portland, and tonight the Analog welcomes three of them: Citizen, Sorority Noise, and Great Grandpa, all of whom swim in indie-rock/emo/post-hardcore/neo-grunge waters. Citizen, from the Rust Belt, brings glam and screamo to the mix. Connecticut’s Sorority Noise is sadder, slightly mellower, and occasionally bouncy. And Seattle’s Great Grandpa live on chunky, buzzy riffs and pop melodies. All of them are good! But if you can only listen to one song from the group, make it Great Grandpa’s “Teen Challenge,” possessor of a perfectly sweet ’n’ sour chorus. BS

FLAT WORMS, THE LAVENDER FLU, MIKE DONOVAN, HONEY BUCKET
(The Know, 3728 NE Sandy) Members of the Los Angeles trio Flat Worms have done time with Ty Segall, the Oh Sees, Sic Alps, and the Babies. But this unimpeachable resumé is bound to give people ideas—wrong ideas that Flat Worms gleefully demolish. The band, which released its debut LP on John Dwyer’s Castle Face Records last month, isn’t some stale spin-off contentedly catching the last wave of 21st-century garage-rock revivalism. It’s a wild and wooly beast of its own, a pummeling force that recalls the dark strain of early ’80s punk that traded suburban angst for dread and paranoia. You probably couldn’t sneak a Flat Worms song onto a mixtape between T.S.O.L. and the Wipers and pass it off as a Reagan-era artifact, but the band rides a modern-day version of that creeped-out vibe that made their forebears such powerful agents of chaos. CHRIS STAMM

DEATH FROM ABOVE, THE BEACHES
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Death from Above helped jumpstart the dance-punk movement of the early ’00s with its 2004 debut, You’re a Woman, I’m a Machine. But the Canadian duo of Sebastien Grainger (vocals/drums) and Jesse F. Keeler (bass) broke up two years later, reuniting to release The Physical World in 2014. Now they’re back with Outrage! Is Now, an album that sounds more mature and stylistically varied without losing the sonic sucker-punch of the band’s earlier work. It’s a little annoying that Death from Above dropped the “1979” from their name—apparently they always thought it sounded stupid—and that Keeler used to associate with Proud Boys/Vice co-founder Gavin McInnes, but at least Outrage! delivers more of what the duo does best. CERVANTE POPE


SUNDAY 11/19

JESSICA DENNISON + JONES, MØTRIK, DRECKIG, RASHEED JAMAL
Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Young Audiences of Oregon & SW Washington’s Live SET (Sound Engineering for Teens) program teaches high schoolers all about live sound engineering. Their end-of-term showcase is a free, all-ages matinee that includes performances by some of Portland’s best local acts, like Jessica Dennison + Jones, Motrik, Dreckig, and Rasheed Jamal. Students get great hands-on experience, you get a terrific free show. NED LANNAMANN

JULIA JACKLIN, FAYE WEBSTER
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Last year Australian singer/songwriter Julia Jacklin released her first LP, Don’t Let the Kids Win, and captivated Pickathon attendees this past August with her easy, breezy alt-country and lyrics about the growing pains of young adulthood. Jacklin’s new singles “Eastwick” and “Cold Caller” emphasize the best parts of her debut: twangy guitar riffs, deep blue pools of reverb, and the her voice, which somehow sounds both coltish and sage. CIARA DOLAN Read our story on Julia Jacklin.

OREGON SYMPHONY, ST. LAWRENCE STRING QUARTET
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) See Saturday’s preview.

MANHATTAN MURDER MYSTERY, MARC AND THE HORSEJERKS, MAN REPELLANT
(The Know, 3728 NE Sandy) I am going to abandon the haughtily objective music-writer pose for a second here, because it’s too hard to write about the weird magic of Manhattan Murder Mystery without a personal anecdote. Odds are good you haven’t heard of this band—they seem to prefer flying under the radar. I knew nothing about them when I literally stumbled into one of their shows a few years ago. They were playing in a clothing store in Echo Park, and they were absolutely destroying this clothing store in Echo Park. The tiny space was a writhing mass of sweaty bodies bound up in beautiful release, summoned into a space of love by this band of weirdoes that had found a glorious sound straddling punk, folk, country, and rock ’n’ roll. I still get goosebumps thinking about that show, which felt like what church is supposed to feel like. Go and get blessed. CS


MONDAY 11/20

OREGON SYMPHONY, ST. LAWRENCE STRING QUARTET
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) See Saturday’s preview.

DHANI HARRISON, SUMMER MOON, MEREKI
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Being the child of a Beatle has got to be one of the more stressful lots in life. That said, Julian and Sean Lennon have done all right for themselves in their artistic endeavors, as have Sir Paul’s and Ringo’s offspring. George Harrison’s only son, Dhani, has worked on various projects over the past 15 years (including helping complete his father’s last album after his death in 2001), but he’s only just now releasing his first solo record at the age of 39. A listen to IN///PARALLEL reveals the uncanny similarity between Dhani’s voice and his father’s and his knack for crafting songs with drama. “Summertime Police” slowly unfurls in a wash of synths, and half of the songs on IN///PARALLEL clock in at over six minutes. There’s definitely some Beatles DNA in there, but Dhani Harrison has created an unsettling 21st-century musical statement—easily the best from any Fab Four descendent. MARK LORE


TUESDAY 11/21

SOUND + VISION: THE LONESOME BILLIES, PLASTIC CACTUS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our Plastic Cactus super pick.

LAURA VEIRS, SHELLEY SHORT
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) This bill features two of the city’s greatest singer/songwriters: Laura Veirs and Shelley Short. Last year, Veirs released the debut LP of her supergroup with Neko Case and k.d. lang, case/lang/veirs, an astonishingly beautiful orchestral folk record that pulls from each woman’s unique musical strengths. Meanwhile, Short released one of the best local records of 2017, Pacific City. Its opening track, “Death,” is an existential ballad set to a waltzing acoustic-guitar melody and inspired by a harrowing drive Short made along the Oregon Coast one stormy night. CD

GARY NUMAN, ME NOT YOU
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) It’s silly how some artists get called one-hit wonders because of a hit single or music video. No one exemplifies this more than Gary Numan, whose 1979 single “Cars” was a Top 10 hit and has been covered, sampled, and used in numerous films. But Numan has also released, and continues to release, records that are as adventurous as his brilliant 1979 solo debut, The Pleasure Principle. He’s influenced the likes of Trent Reznor with his early use of synthesizers, as well as many metal musicians due to his keen sense of darkness and dread. Numan’s early records are spotless—the perfect blend of futuristic sounds with live drums and bass. It may have taken some time before he got the recognition he deserves, but that’s never slowed him down. Twenty-one records in, and Numan’s part of the future he helped create almost four decades ago. ML