LORDE Sat 3/10 Moda Center Chuff Media

SUPERPICK

LORDE, RUN THE JEWELS, TOVE STRYKE
(Sat March 10 at Moda Center, 1 N Center Ct) It’s still staggering to think Lorde (born Ella Yelich-O’Connor) was just 16 when she released “Royals,” her massively successful breakthrough single. Broken down, the song is relatively simple, with finger snaps, sparse electronic beats, and unprocessed vocals. But the New Zealand pop star’s formidable voice and self-assured lyrics permanently shifted the tectonic plates of mainstream pop. “Royals” was just a teensy preview of her chops, as evidenced by the other boundary-shattering outsider anthems on her 2013 debut, Pure Heroine, which even found a fan in the late David Bowie (who told Lorde her music felt like “listening to tomorrow”). Last year she returned with her Jack Antonoff-produced sophomore album, Melodrama, which was inspired by her recent entry into adulthood, rebuilding her identity after a breakup, the welcome anonymity of life in New York, Greek melodramas, wild parties, alien landings, and her experience with synesthesia (the neurological phenomenon that enables some people to “see” colors upon hearing specific musical notes). There’s a lot of life overflowing from the record’s 11 songs—from the racing heartbeat rhythm of “Green Light” to the exultant horns of “Sober” to the icy, cinematic strings of the title track, Lorde captures “all the glamour and the trauma and the fuckin’ melodrama” of exiting adolescence and surveying adulthood’s wide-open horizon. Listening is a total rush; it’s hard not to get swept up in the current of her emotions, which surge through anger, ecstasy, fear, and overpowering hunger for something she can’t quite name. If Lorde’s concert is half as intoxicating and unpredictable as the tracks on Melodrama, Portland’s in for a treat. CIARA DOLAN


WEDNESDAY 3/7

DECIBEL TOUR: ENSLAVED, WOLVES IN THE THRONE ROOM, MYRKUR, KHEMMIS
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) Every year, the unholy bible of heavy metal publications, Decibel magazine, puts its name on a national tour of likeminded bands. And every year, the lineup is at least good, and sometimes, it’s a can’t-miss. This is one of those can’t-miss years: At the top of the bill are the legendary Norwegian scowlers of Enslaved, who have evolved from a fairly standard black metal act into a dynamic heavy band that incorporates prog, shoegaze, and symphonic metal into its sound. They are giants of the genre, as are Wolves in the Throne Room, woodsy black metal pioneers from Olympia who will play the main support slot on this tour. The bottom half of the bill features two promising young acts: Myrkur of Denmark, whose blend of goth, folk, metal, and post-rock oozes crossover potential, and Khemmis from Denver, a quartet whose classic metal sound is slightly doomed, super-melodic, and totally epic. Short version: This lineup slays. BEN SALMON

THE WEDDING PRESENT, TERRY DE CASTRO
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) The Wedding Present is one of early indie rock’s under-appreciated greats. The UK group’s 1987 debut—the surreally titled George Best, named for the athlete—is a masterpiece of imperfect, quintessentially English pop that blazed a trail many British bands would soon follow. On the Wedding Present’s landmark release, 1991’s Seamonsters, the band benefitted from an added focus provided by producer Steve Albini. As a result, Seamonsters isn’t just the Wedding Present’s best LP—it’s indie pop at its rawest and most relentless, and many of its songs sound eerily current (despite some cringe-worthy couplets). Highlights include the breakneck jangle-pop anthem “Dare” and shoe-gazing slow-burn “Blonde,” which sounds like if Morrissey could write a song that actually meant something. MORGAN TROPER


THURSDAY 3/8

TRIBE MARS, AMENTA ABIOTO, SHEERS
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Portland intergalactic soul and funk outfit Tribe Mars is all about “combating the forces of tyranny and systematic oppression through music, art, and spiritual practices.” Sonically speaking, it’s already set to be a dope evening, but tonight’s lineup features another big draw: talented songwriter/producer/looper Amenta Abioto. Abioto’s unique sounds cover everything from soulful gospel to jazz and hip-hop influences, and West African beats. If you haven’t witnessed her live set yet, you need to. JENNI MOORE

THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) They Might Be Giants’ influence has never been more widespread—it pops up in the Lemon Twigs’ askew ’60s pastiches and Radiator Hospital’s shrill outsider anthems. It can even be sensed indirectly in the junk-tech fetishes of laptop kids like (Sandy) Alex G and Porches. You see, while They Might Be Giants might be remembered for penning the theme song to Malcolm in the Middle, the group’s first four albums are milestones in modern art-pop. The nucleus of Johns Linnell and Flansburgh created a multitude of sounds with the limited palette of unconvincing keyboard instruments, unprocessed guitar, and accordion; their early material varied wildly in tone, from the pining autobiography of “Don’t Let’s Start” and “Narrow Your Eyes” to the meta pop disassembly of “Number Three” and “I Palindrome I.” TMBG—not to be confused with TCBY—get extra points for writing sensitive, shamelessly clever songs adorned with My First Casio keyboard patches well into the grunge era, when all rock music had to be raw, stupid, and serious. Consequently, “Birdhouse in Your Soul” has aged way better than “Even Flow.” MT

AAN, GENDERS, DAN DAN
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Aan has reshaped several times since forming in 2008. On their 2014 debut, Amor Ad Nauseum, the Portland art-pop band—led by the nebulous songwriting of Bud Wilson—deconstructed gloomy rock ’n’ roll schematics for vaster sonic terrain. The group’s 2016 follow-up, Dada Distractions, yielded even further experimentation, multi-instrumentation, and even some unabashed pummelers, like “Hollywood Buyout.” Recently, Aan’s been woodshedding a new LP, Losing My Shadow, with yet another updated lineup and still more exploratory songcraft in tow. The lushness of the fresh five-piece is immediately striking on “Falling”—a kind of meditative lullaby replete with vivid synth and Wilson’s fragile tenor. Another unreleased track, “Mistakes,” finds the band fully utilizing their souped-up aural grab bag, grinding out a sultry anti-pop banger. The new record is expected to be out sometime in 2018, but Aan will perform some new songs as they co-headline this show with Genders. RYAN J. PRADO


DJ JAZZY JEFF Fri 3/9 45 East Cristopher Schafer

FRIDAY 3/9

DJ JAZZY JEFF, DJ WICKED, DJ NATURE
(45 East, 315 SE 3rd) Jeff Townes is known as “The Magnificent” Jazzy Jeff because only such a mellifluous superlative could properly capture the precision in his hands and the genius between his ears. There isn't a single aspect of the DJ arts this hip-hop legend hasn't mastered. Hell, he probably invented about five or six of 'em himself. Selecting, scratching, blending, juggling—If this isn't the single best DJ showcase you see in this city all year, then 2018 is gonna be one miraculous year. BOBBY ROBERTS

EZZA ROSE, BITCH’N, KENDALL CORE
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Tonight Portland singer/songwriter Ezza Rose celebrates the release of her excellent new album No Means No. Across seven shimmering pop-rock tracks, Rose examines the weight of words, particularly in terms of boundaries and forgiveness. For this hometown release show, she’ll be joined by rock ’n’ roll super-squad Bitch’n and goth folksinger Kendall Core. CD

CEREMONY OF SLUDGE: DISENCHANTER, WILL, MANE OF THE CUR, VOID REALM, GLACIAL FALL
(Tonic Lounge, 3100 NE Sandy) Ceremony of Sludge oozes into its seventh year with another weekend of wall-to-wall bangers. While the two-night metal/doom fest used to feature lesser-known bands, it’s evolved to focus on a solid mix of obscure and globetrotting heavies. Disenchanter, who has risen to the top of Portland’s heavy metal heap through hard work and incessant live performances, leads the pack on night one. The addition of drummer Douglas Jennings Barrett has given the band a jolt, and the result is a lethal combination of American doom and NWOBHM. The funereal Will and heavy metalists Mane of the Cur creep out onstage for rare performances. (The latter’s forthcoming record Retreat of the Glaciers is out this month.) Newcomers Void Realm (featuring former Atriarch guitarist Brooks Blackhawk) and two-piece electronic doom band Glacial Fall round out a bill that’s so action-packed, you might need to wear a hardhat and safety goggles. MARK LORE

TUMBLEEDOWN HOUSE, JOHN BROTHERS PIANO COMPANY 
(Jack London Revue, 529 SW 4th) Commenting on the years following the First World War, songwriter Hoagy Carmichael described the 1920s as coming in “with a bang of bad booze, flappers with bare legs, jangled morals, and wild weekends.” This is also an apt description for the music of Tumbledown House. The San Francisco band (and former Portlanders) play the kind of music that once filled speakeasies and other houses of ill repute, providing the soundtrack to the Prohibition era. More than a nostalgia act, Tumbledown House writes material that sounds just as at home in this decade as it did during the Roaring ’20s, while frontwoman Gillian Wolfe purrs and snarls onstage like Edith Piaf at the end of a five-day bender. The band has released three albums, most recently 2016’s Sum and Substance, with nine original songs ranging in subject from Josephine Baker to Peruvian shamans. Head downstairs into the dim and clandestine Jack London Revue, order a gin rickey, and make believe you’re rubbing elbows with Jay Gatsby. SANTI ELIJAH HOLLEY

CURTIS ON TOUR: BERNSTEIN’S 100TH BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION
(Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta) The grave of Leonard Bernstein sits on a Brooklyn hilltop, complete with a panoramic vista of water and city that includes the Statue of Liberty in the distance—an apt view for one of America’s greatest musical legends. As a tireless educator, Bernstein would be proud to know that some of the brightest students from Philadelphia’s Curtis Institute of Music are traveling the country this year to celebrate the centenary of his birth. These young artists are joining forces with clarinet god David Shifrin and the Zorá String Quartet for a setlist that includes several works from the composer’s catalog, including an arrangement of songs and dances from West Side Story. Along with pieces from Bernstein, the program also includes music composed by other notable first-generation Americans: Aaron Copland and George Gershwin. Something’s comin’, something good! BRIAN HORAY

BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME, THE DEAR HUNTER, LEPROUS
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Any time Norwegian metal giants Enslaved stop in Portland (see Wednesday’s listing), chances are very good they’ll be the most prog-influenced heavy band in town that week. But not this time—not with prog-metal veterans Between the Buried and Me rolling into Wonder Ballroom tonight. Where Enslaved spices up its sound with prog elements, Between the Buried and Me’s primary aesthetic revolves around the zigzagging arrangements, whiplash rhythms, and technical wizardry of prog-metal. For nearly two decades, the North Carolina band has skillfully walked the line between melodic grandeur, machine-gun thrash, and controlled chaos, rarely taking its foot off the gas. The first part of their new two-part album, Automata I, comes out today, with Automata II expected this coming summer. BS


SATURDAY 3/10

LORDE, RUN THE JEWELS, TOVE STYRKE
(Moda Center, 1 N Center Court) Read our Lorde super pick.

CEREMONY OF SLUDGE VII: WITCH MOUNTAIN, EYE OF SOLITUDE, MARCHE FUNEBRE, USNEA, HZ
(Tonic Lounge, 3100 NE Sandy) See Friday’s preview.

DONAVON FRANKENREITER, JOHN CRAIGIE
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Billabong- sponsored surfer and Jack Johnson protégé (shudder) Donavon Frankenreiter headlines tonight’s show, but his opening act is the name worth remembering. John Craigie is the California-born, Portland-based singer/songwriter whose Americana ballads and aw-shucks humor instantly won over the crowd at Pickathon’s 2018 kickoff party (he’ll play the festival this summer). Last year Craigie released a new LP called No Rain, No Rose, which delivers more of the Mitch Hedberg-meets-Bob Dylan folksongs he’s been honing over the past decade, especially his ode to astronaut Michael Collins and cover of the Rolling Stones’ “Tumbling Dice.” But the best introduction to Craigie is still probably “I Wrote Mr. Tambourine Man” (from 2013’s The Apocalypse Is Over); at the Pickathon party he said he’d written the song after meeting a man in a New Orleans bar who claimed to have been ripped off by Dylan. CD

COLIN JENKINS, RYAN OXFORD
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Some might know Colin Jenkins through his piano skills and harmonic hand in the Portland pop brigade Ages and Ages. A few less might know Jenkins through his solo material, which amounts to just a few sparse demos and covers uploaded online. That’s about to change with his newest record, RE: FWD: FWD, which diverges from that old simplicity and dives headfirst into bright ’80s retro-pop territory. From the campier “Get My Weed from You” to standout “Closer2You,” Jenkins has built a collection of songs with kaleidoscopic synth juxtaposed by tight percussive beds, creating a world that feels palpably neon. The real thrill comes from Jenkins’ vocal performance, often flanked by soft harmonies and guest singers. At times, his velvety pop timbre even evokes tamer moments of old Prince lines. Tonight’s record release show will kick off with the dreamy psych-folk offerings of fellow local Ryan Oxford. ROBIN BACIOR


WHITNEY BALLEN Sun 3/11 Doug Fir Courtesy of the artist

SUNDAY 3/11

CELEBRATING DAVID BOWIE
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Bowie tributes have multiplied like the giant rats in Hunger City, but when Bowie’s original collaborators are involved, it’s worth scoring a ticket. Pianist Mike Garson (that’s him pole-vaulting all over “Aladdin Sane”) and guitarist Earl Slick (Station to Station, the “Serious Moonlight” tour) are just two of the Starman’s longtime associates involved with the “Celebrating David Bowie” tribute tour, and with Sting’s kid Joe Sumner on vocals, they’re well suited to pay proper homage to one of the greatest catalogs in music. NED LANNAMANN

TURTLENECKED, BLACK BELT EAGLE SCOUT, WHITNEY BALLEN
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) It’s time for the second installment of 555-Burn, the Doug Fir’s new monthly concert series showcasing some of the best in local music. For this month’s show, they’ve teamed up with Good Cheer Records for a lineup featuring three of the label’s artists. Despite the fact that Harrison Smith (AKA Turtlenecked) and Katherine Paul (AKA Black Belt Eagle Scout) are two of Good Cheer’s biggest names, they’ve yet to take the stage together. Black Belt Eagle Scout’s 2017 debut Mother of My Children blends post-grunge and tender pop, and is gently captivating when played live. Seattle’s Whitney Ballen will open with her warm Joanna Newsom-meets-Kria Brekkan slow-pop. Proceeds from this 555-Burn show go toward Portland Public Schools’ Nutrition Services, so seeing some good artists for a good price and a good cause are pretty synonymous. CERVANTE POPE


SON LUX Mon 3/12 Doug Fir Powerline Agency

MONDAY 3/12

SON LUX, GORDI, WILLS
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Last year, composer Ryan Lott lost a friend to cancer and welcomed a baby into the world. On Brighter Wounds, his newest album under the Son Lux moniker, Lott reckons with these tumultuous changes. He’s written film scores, and the songs on Brighter Things have a cinematic, sweeping quality, but few are predictable. Across 10 tracks, Lott, guitarist Rafiq Bhatia, and drummer Ian Chang demonstrate their skillful musicianship; Chang’s sparse drums mingle with Bhatia’s jazz-influenced guitar, and the occasional, wonderful horn section. Lott’s voice wavers so haphazardly, he sounds like a combination of Björk and Billie Holiday, revamped for the Soundcloud era. Diehard Son Lux fans should definitely check out the band’s live renditions of their songs, which, based on my meticulous YouTube research, vary greatly from their recordings. ISABEL LYNDON


TUESDAY 3/13

A TRIBE CALLED RED
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Ottawa DJ crew A Tribe Called Red blends traditional First Nations music, hip-hop, and EDM to create what they call “powwow-step.” Bear Witness, 200lman, and NDN (who recently left the group to focus on activism) started hosting their wildly popular Electric Pow Wow dance parties for the local indigenous community in 2008, and since then, they’ve released three albums: 2012’s A Tribe Called Red, 2013’s Nation II Nation, and 2016’s We Are the Halluci Nation, which features Yasiin Bey (FKA Mos Def) on “R.E.D.” and monologues from author Joseph Boyden, who writes about colonialism and the systemic inequalities still faced by indigenous people in North America. By allowing past and present to coexist, ATCR celebrates the vibrancy and resilience of modern First Nations cultures. CD