TROX Fri 8/24 Evergreen; PRINCESS NOKIA Sat 8/15 Dr. Martens; BLACK BELT EAGLE SCOUT Fri 8/24 Bunk Bar; LILLY HIATT Fri 8/24 Alberta Rose Theatre Riley Brown, Alberto Vargas, Jason Quigley, Alysse Gafkjen

WEDNESDAY 8/22

ROONEY, MATING RITUAL
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Most people probably know Rooney from The O.C.—which was indisputably the best show on TV until it was tragically cancelled in 2007—specifically from their performance at the Bait Shop during the Oliver arc in the first season. The Los Angeles outfit played their hit “I’m Shakin’,” which contains the soul-quaking chorus, “Now I’m sh-sh-shakin’, sh-shakin’ now/I’m sh-sh-shakin’, sh-shakin’ now.” Or perhaps you know frontman Robert Schwartzman—brother of Jason Schwartzman, who was in Phantom Planet, the band responsible for the show’s theme song, and cousin of Nic Cage and Sofia Coppola—as Mia Thermopolis’ love interest in The Princess Diaries, in which he is also a cool rocker dude and puts Skittles on his keyboard while he plays. Either way, Rooney is still apparently making music and touring: The band’s last album, 2016’s Washed Away, repurposes the Strokes-cribbing sounds of their 2003 debut with glitzy synth-pop that could be much worse. CIARA DOLAN


THURSDAY 8/23

BOSSIN’ UP: RASHEED JAMAL, RAQUEL DIVAR, JAHDI, DANNY SKY
(Bossanova Ballroom, 722 E Burnside) Presented by stand-up comic Shrista Tyree, Bossin’ Up is a new monthly showcase highlighting some of Portland’s dopest hip-hop artists. Tyree will make jokes and perform comedic raps between sets, and introduce each month’s special guest. This month’s headliner is excellent rapid-fire rapper Rasheed Jamal. A trio of MCs—Raquel Divar, Jahdi, and Danny Sky—add solid support to the bill. JENNI MOORE

SLAYER, LAMB OF GOD, ANTHRAX, TESTAMENT, NAPALM DEATH
(Sunlight Supply Amphitheater, 17200 NE Delfel, Ridgefield, WA) This is it—the Last Chance Saloon for all the rabid Slayer fans on the planet. From now until mid-2019, Slayer is on what they’re calling their “Final World Tour.” It’s sad to see a band as legendary and influential hang up their spurs, but it really comes at an appropriate time for them. Slayer is tip-toeing the threshold of becoming complete caricatures of themselves. Just a few more steps, and they’ll be thrash metal’s KISS. While 2015’s Repentless posted some of the best chart numbers in Slayer’s careerthere was certainly a spark missing. Repentless is a record from a band that has reached their twilight years, and are sadly pulling further and further away from the fire that their career was initially forged in. Slayer has never released a bad album, but their inspiration is certainly waning. Tom Araya is a devout Catholic and family man, Jeff Hanneman is dead, Dave Lombardo values contracts over a punishing double kick, and Kerry King is rad and will never die. But Slayer... Slayer is dying. Bid these uncontested kings of metal farewell one last time, before they come back in three to five years for their mediocre reunion tour. ARIS HUNTER WALES

FUCK, BLESST CHEST
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Fuck sounds a tiny bit older on their first album in 15 years—a line about ditching Nabokov for the comfort of magazines sums up middle-age pretty well—but The Band retains the slanted charm of their prolific turn-of-the-century run. Every Fuck record has a found quality, like the Oakland-born quartet figured out how to make the misshapen products of pop history shine and sing again. A similar approach catapulted Pavement to golden boy status, and like Stockton’s favorite sons, Fuck has a smart kid disdain for finishing a thought. Their peripatetic stoner vibe takes them into the light of luminaries like Bedhead, Sebadoh, and Smog, but Fuck has always been too restless and weird to commit to a groove. They were and are definitely of their moment, but they were and are also always just Fuck, and it’s really nice to have them back. CHRIS STAMM

STEVE MILLER BAND, PETER FRAMPTON
(Edgefield, 2126 SW Halsey, Troutdale) With its airbrush-blue cover boasting a starry-eyed, fire-maned mustang, Greatest Hits 1974-78 is the only Steve Miller Band album that anyone on Earth has ever heard or seen. Did other Steve Miller Band albums ever exist, or did Greatest Hits 1974-78 simply flash into existence, pure and whole, in that cold autumn of 1978? Today’s music scientists still don’t know, and they never will—like the spooky intricacies of quantum mechanics, the mysteries of Steve Miller are unimaginable to humankind. All we can truly know is that from “Swingtown” to “Wild Mountain Honey,” from “True Fine Love” to “The Joker,” and from “Take the Money and Run” to “Jungle Love,” Greatest Hits 1974-78 contains the purest possible distillation of radio-friendly ’70s rock; like Newton’s laws or The Fault in Our Stars, its truth is unimpeachable, its power unmeasurable. The white-funk guitars and lube-smooth synths of Greatest Hits 1974-78 will echo across the Milky Way until the heat-death of the universe, when every piece of matter in existence will tremble and glow to the infinite melody of “Rock’n Me.” ERIK HENRIKSEN


FRIDAY 8/24

RED BULL PRESENTS: SXLXMXN, TROX, NEILL VON TALLY, QUICKLY QUICKLY, FRITZWA
(The Evergreen, 618 SE Alder) Red Bull is throwing this dance party to celebrate the producers who’re elevating the city’s hip-hop from behind the scenes. The jam-packed lineup includes SXLXMXN (pronounced Solomon), who’s worked with the likes of Danny Brown and the Underachievers, the illustrious Neill Von Tally, who’s well known in these parts for his collaborations with the Last Artful, Dodgr, triple-threat talent Fritzwa (she sings, raps, and produces), and more, including some surprise special guests. CD Also read our story on Portland’s rising hip-hop producers.

WILD ONES, BLOSSOM, SCHAUS, MY BODY DJs
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Horrendous news: Wild Ones are breaking up, just one year after releasing their excellent sophomore album Mirror Touch. Sadly, “this has gotta be the last time” (to crib a line from their track “Paresthesia”), but on the bright side, the electro-pop sweethearts will bid adieu with two farewell shows at Mississippi Studios this week. CD Also read our Wild Ones eulogy.

AMANDA SHIRES, LILLY HIATT
(Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta) Nashville country singer Lilly Hiatt—who, I only just realized, is the daughter of singer/songwriter John Hiatt—released one of my favorite records of 2017 with Trinity Lane. The majority of the album grapples with loss, sobriety, and the pain that often comes with self-reflection, but it’s driven by hope. “Gonna hang on a little bit longer,” she sings on the title track, “Sleep well, work a little harder/Put my faith in something I can’t see.” Rock ’n’ rollers of yore appear on several songs, from scorcher “The Night David Bowie Died” to “Imposter” (a song about her dad) to standout track “Records”: “I put the needle down, hey Mr. Young/You know our work is never done.” Between locomotive rhythms, electrifying guitar solos, confessional lyrics, and Hiatt’s gritty, powerful drawl, the frayed beauty of Trinity Lane deconstructs the foundations of traditional country music and builds something refreshingly new. CD

PORTUGAL. THE MAN, URAL THOMAS AND THE PAIN
(Edgefield, 2126 SW Halsey, Troutdale) Portugal. The Man have spent 2018 making the most of their newfound fame. First, they won a gosh-darned Grammy for their big hit single “Feel It Still,” and while accepting the award, they shouted out Satan and pretended to wipe their butt with the trophy. Then, the band performed live in downtown Portland to support the March for Our Lives rally to curb gun violence. In April, Portugal. The Man’s name showed up as a sponsor of a hilarious local billboard that urged LeBron James to consider signing with the Trail Blazers. And then at Coachella, the band opened its set with the Blazers’ “Trumpets” intro music, and some members wore C.J. McCollum jerseys. Now, they’re back to play a couple of Portland shows, and it’s probably reasonable to expect a lot of hometown love coming from the stage. BEN SALMON

HURRY UP, SLANG, BLACK BELT EAGLE SCOUT
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Perhaps what has always anchored punk is simple, steady 4/4 drumming. Where hardcore veered off into flailing haymaker percussion, ’90s college rock bands like Sleater-Kinney opted for tighter but no less punchy jabs. Janet Weiss of the aforementioned Pacific Northwest staple has brought the distinctive style to countless Portland acts, from Stephen Malkmus and the Jicks, Wild Flag, and now to the new local super-group Slang. The band features former Thermals bassist Kathy Foster, Viva Voce guitarist Anita Lee Elliott, and Modern Kin vocalist Drew Grow. With just a single track released thus far, the fiery X-influenced garage rock banger “Warm Enough,” Slang is playing their first hometown show alongside Foster’s other band Hurry Up and Black Belt Eagle Scout, whose excellent 2017 debut Mother of My Children via Portland’s Good Cheer Records is set to be re-released through Saddle Creek Records next month. CAMERON CROWELL


SATURDAY 8/25

DISCOGS CRATE DIGGERS RECORD FAIR: DJ ROANE, DJ PROVOKE, DJ DOCTOR DAKAR, & MORE
(White Owl Social Club, 1305 SE 8th) Virtual music marketplace Discogs has become an invaluable tool for online record hounds, but every year the Oregon-based site hosts Crate Diggers, a hometown record fair with face-to-face transactions that fosters record-collecting community. For the event’s fifth year, expect more than 30 vinyl vendors, plus DJ sets from DJ Roane, DJ Provoke, Allen “The Ambassador” Thayer, and more! NED LANNAMANN

MUSICFESTNW PRESENTS IN THE LOT: PRINCESS NOKIA, THE LAST ARTFUL DODGR, NAKED GIANTS, PINKY PINKY, AAN
(Dr. Martens, 2 NW 10th) Generally, spending your whole day in a parking lot doesn't exactly guarantee a good time. But this weekend is the exception that proves the rule, with Musicfest NW teaming up with Dr. Martens to host some great performances in Docs’ parking lot. Sunday’s got Twin Peak, Dude York, and more, but Saturday’s got the must-sees, with performances from Naked Giants, the Last Artful, Dodgr, and the inimitable Princess Nokia, whose pulsing beats and New York swagger do guarantee a good time. Maybe leave the Docs at home, though. It’s gonna be a billion degrees. EH

WILD ONES, REPTALIENS, SUNBATHE, MY BODY DJs
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See Friday's preview.

PORTUGAL. THE MAN, CHANTI DARLING
(Edgefield, 2126 SW Halsey, Troutdale) See Friday’s preview.

PURE BATHING CULTURE, KING WHO, KACEY JOHANSING
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) It’s been three years since Pure Bathing Culture released their last LP, Pray for Rain, but for Turntable Kitchen’s Sounds Delicious series, the Portland band decided to record their own version of Hats, the classic 1989 record from Scottish duo the Blue Nile. Sarah Versprille and Daniel Hindman play off one another in recreating the depressing romanticism that gave the Blue Nile’s artsy pop its extra kick, with a little help from Death Cab for Cutie frontman Ben Gibbard on the track “Saturday Night.” Only 1,000 of copies of Hats are being pressed—be sure to grab one at the show, which doubles as an album release party for King Who’s new record Giant Eye. CERVANTE POPE

THE SMASHING PUMPKINS, METRIC
(Moda Center, 1 N Center Ct) In 1993 and 1995, the Smashing Pumpkins unleashed two of the best albums of that decade: Dreamy and cruel, Siamese Dream and Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness found Billy Corgan’s lilting vocals drifting over James Iha’s lush guitars, D’arcy Wretzky’s moody bass, and Jimmy Chamberlin’s cranky drums. Even at the Pumpkins’ peak, when they headlined Homerpalooza on The Simpsons, Corgan was ridiculous (glowering and capricious, he vowed Mellon Collie would be “The Wall for Generation X”), but one couldn’t argue with their arena shows or B-sides. As flannel faded, they broke up and reunited ad infinitum, with Iha, Chamberlin, and more—though never Wretzky—orbiting Corgan’s gleaming moon of a head. So much of this stuff still works (“Cherub Rock,” “Geek U.S.A.,” “Disarm,” “Tonight, Tonight,” “1979,” “Thirty-Three,” the patently preposterous, patently awesome “Bullet with Butterfly Wings”), but the Pumpkins’ most lasting impact might be their influence on those who followed. (Years later, their rock-opera baroqueness and emo-kid lyrics would be sharpened and polished by My Chemical Romance.) For the “Shiny and Oh So Bright Tour” (heavy sigh), Corgan, Iha, and Chamberlin vow their setlist will pull from their first five albums; it might as well be called the “Give the Gen Xers What They Want Tour,” and I have zero complaints. EH


SUNDAY 8/26

PORTLAND HIP-HOP DAY: LIBRETTO, MIC CAPES, RASHEED JAMAL, WYNNE, KARMA RIVERA, & MORE
(Portland City Hall, 1221 SW 4th) After the recent passing of longtime rapper/host/events specialist/radio personality Idris “StarChile” O’ferral, the annual Portland Hip-Hop Day has officially been moved to August 26 (whereas it was formerly held on October 15). This year’s event will also honor StarChile’s legacy and celebrate his contributions to Portland’s hip-hop community and culture—including being a key founder of the then-monthly Mic Check showcase, and Portland Hip-Hop Day itself. Now led by hip-hop day co-organizer DJ OG One, and themed as “Legends: The Future of Now and Then,” this year’s lineup is seriously massive. Veteran MCs like Cool Nutz, Mic Crenshaw, Libretto, and the Lifesavas will take the mic outside City Hall, in addition to a slew of artists from the new wave: St. Johns rapper Mic Capes, viral blonde-haired MC Wynne, the lively Karma Rivera, as well as Andre Waymond, Bocha, Fountaine, and many more. JM

MUSICFESTNW PRESENTS IN THE LOT: TWIN PEAKS, DUDE YORK, ROSEBLOOD, NO KIND OF RIDER, THE BLACK TONES
(Dr. Martens Airwair USA) See Saturday's preview.

COLLATE, PREENING, THE SOCIAL STOMACH, MERINGUE
(The Cobra Lounge, 2027 NE MLK) Read our story on Collate.

LARKIN GRIMM, CASPAR SONNET, FLAXEN HAIR
(Specks Records & Tapes, 8216 N Denver) Larkin Grimm’s enchanting voice has the tendency to sweep you away. Nestled above dizzying and diverse witchy folk instrumentals, Grimm’s songs soar on experimental bents and mystical melodies. Her latest release, 2017’s Chasing an Illusion, begins with disjointed minimalism, eroding and building up again on “Ah Love Is Oceanic Pleasure,” while Grimm’s range is given centerstage. She will be joined by Portland solo project Flaxen Hair, whose recent demos approximate Ennio Morricone’s eerie The Thing soundtrack and some of the more abstract ruminations of Philip Glass, anchored by heavy doses of wispy synth and deft guitar loops. RYAN J. PRADO

REMO DRIVE, FIELD MEDIC, BEACH BUNNY
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) With Paramore’s After Laughter and Mitski’s Be the Cowboy, alternative pop is clearly experiencing a reawakening. Beach Bunny, the latest group to rise out of Chicago’s eclectic DIY scene, is no stranger to this movement. The project began as DePaul University student Lili Trifilio’s solo endeavor in 2015, but later filled out as a full band before the release of their latest EP Prom Queen. The title track retrospectively analyzes Trifilio’s high school years in a tambourine-fueled craze, and “Painkiller” likens a nasty breakup to various medical procedures like pulling teeth over fast-paced surf rock melodies. Through clever songwriting and Trifilio’s smooth, Lady Lamb-like vocals, Beach Bunny explores themes from anxiety to “adulting” in upbeat tracks made for dancing away the heartbreak. ANNA KAPLAN

FEAR, CH3
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Punk rock is supposed to push the buttons and boundaries of society, and if any band pushed these to the absolute limit, it was Los Angeles’ Fear. In the early ’80s, when most punk bands were combating crooked politicians, empowering the exploited, and challenging conservative lifestyles, Fear was saying “I don’t care about you!” to everyone indiscriminately. The band’s bullheaded approach was offensive, hyper-masculine, and often instigated violence, but their musicianship and creativity went unmatched. How could a band be complete assholes and still somehow manage to become supremely influential? See three out of four original members perform and find out for yourself. AHW


TUESDAY 8/28

SAMANTHA FISH
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Kansas City blues crooner Samantha Fish is as prolific as she is talented. Her latest record, 2017’s Belle of the West, was her second LP of the year, following Chills & Fever. Both albums feature Fish’s melodic dexterity and her affinity for sultry blues traditions, but they also feature some of the best blues guitar you’ll hear from anyone in the business. “He Did It,” the rollicking opener to Chills & Fever, showcases Fish’s incendiary fretwork under a canopy of skronky brass and jangly rhythms. While she dabbles in other areas of songcraft—most notably on her third record Wild Heart, where she explored a rootsier rock vibe—Fish excels when allowing her dalliances with the outskirts of roadhouse blues to shine, as heard on the title track from Chills & Fever, which finds her exceptional backing band slinking along in an intoxicating ’60s pop shuffle. RJP