THURSDAY 9/11

THE JUAN MACLEAN, COPY, DJ JOEEIRWIN

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) A former cohort of James Murphy of LCD Soundsystem, Juan MacLean has been in and out of the music business over the years. At present, he is thankfully back in, and his aptly dubbed band the Juan MacLean will provide potent dance grooves and unstoppable electro beats as they preview their upcoming album on DFA Records, The Future Will Come. You won't be able to keep still—that's a promise. NED LANNAMANN

TBA FESTIVAL: LIVE BAND VS. OHMEGA WATTS, REV. SHINES

(Leftbank, 240 N Broadway) See Destination Fun.

I'VE GOT A HOLE IN MY SOUL: IAN SVENONIUS, DJ BEYONDA

(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) As if it wasn't already hard enough to get into the packed soul throwdown that is DJ Beyonda's monthly I've Got a Hole in My Soul dance party, Rotture's second anniversary has to feature Ian Svenonius behind the decks for a special DJ set. You know Svenonius from Nation of Ulysses, the Make-Up, Cupid Car Club, Weird War, his baffling (and totally visionary) book The Psychic Soviet, and from his picture being pinned-up inside my high school locker (OMG! Right next to one of Christina Billotte!). He's a sucker for soul music, so my assumption is that he'll be spinning something along those lines, but if the past 20 years has taught us anything about Svenonius, it's that the man has terrific hair... oh, and he's really unpredictable too. Also see Once More With Feeling. EZRA ACE CARAEFF

sBACH, BREAKFAST MOUNTAIN, T.K.Y.K., GUIDANCE COUNSELOR

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) If the name Spencer Seim (aka sBACH) is familiar to you, it's probably owing to his status as the guitarist of Hella, whose music has evolved from relatively straightforward instrumental-duo workouts to something instrumentally expansive and far stranger. He's also part of the Advantage, whose songbook delves back into any number of NES themes and fight songs. sBACH borrows some conventions from the latter, but rather than apply a rock sensibility to 8-bit pop, Seim instead applies a crackling digital hum to shifting tempos, relentless percussion, and furious guitars. And, as on "Track 6," sometimes those gloriously retro beeps can make for a sound that's unexpectedly elating. TOBIAS CARROLL

XIU XIU, PRURIENT, MARY HALVORSON, JESSICA PAVONE

(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) If you want to get the full Xiu Xiu experience in one quick, mildly painless injection, listen to "I Do What I Want, When I Want," the opening number from their latest recording, Women as Lovers. The accurately titled song sums up this always-evolving troupe's musical mission—one that shifts and deconstructs around the deep artistic pull of frontman Jamie Stewart—and might be the finest moment in their eight-year career. Ever since I first witnessed Xiu Xiu perform in the Fast Forward basement (kids, this was before your time), I knew I was witnessing something special, even if the raw, at times grating delivery of Stewart always kept me at arm's distance. While the band hasn't quite mellowed over the years—Women still has plenty of moments of unflinchingly honesty and emotional heft—they've just refined the experience into something that is more pure, and even more listenable, than anything up until this point. EAC

GIT SOME, DRUNKEN BOAT, DARK SKIES, OLD GROWTH

(Satyricon, 125 NW 6th) You might recognize Chuck French and Neil Keener from Planes Mistaken for Stars. Or at the very least, you might recognize their swinging balls, since their former band had a penchant for memorable onstage nudity, which—depending on your opinion of gazing at pasty flesh—was either a welcome moment of onstage dude-rotica, or a nightmare that still haunts your soul to this very day. There's no telling if their new vehicle, Git Some, will stayed dressed or not, but the band does share one common element with Planes Mistaken for Stars—pure fucking chaos. It's loud, brash, and joyfully confrontational, and that's just on record. No telling what kind of madness they'll drum up tonight (or tomorrow, when they play at the Know), but here's hoping they keep their knickers on while they do it. EAC

FRIDAY 9/12

SCHOOL OF ROCK PLAYS THE MUSIC OF METALLICA

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) Go ahead: I hereby challenge you to think of anything as adorable as little kids playing Metallica. Go ahead. Try. See? IMPOSSIBLE. Tonight, the talented kid musicians from the Paul Green School of Rock Music are going to be doing their best James Hetfields and Lars Ulrichs. Let's just hope these kids stay cool, and no one asks them what they think of Napster. EH

FLYING LOTUS, ALEX B, DUNDIGGY, J. ROBY

(Holocene, 1001 SE Burnside) See Fly Me to the Moon.

DRUNKEN BOAT, GIT SOME, SCIENCE OF YABRA

(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) See Thursday's listing.

BAD RELIGION, THE BRONX, LIGHTNIN WOODCOCK

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Even a mildly interested patron of punk rock should know who Bad Religion is. They're practically a classic rock band now, which is sad with regard to how consistently excellent their releases and live shows have continued to be, even with a Rolodex-rotating drummer problem (they seem to have finally stuck with Brooks Wackerman for the foreseeable future). They haven't had to reinvent the wheel; they pretty much invented it anyway. Pick out a volume of the encyclopedia and look up the origin of four-on-the-floor punk beats, you should find a Christian cross surrounded by a circle and a line through it. It's a disservice to relegate them to "Godfathers of Punk" status, but regardless, their infectious brand of punk awareness is the real deal, and if you've never seen BR perform (come on...), bring a dictionary. RYAN J. PRADO

DAMIEN JURADO, JENNIFER O'CONNOR (early show) See Echos and Urgency; HARVEY DANGER, LITTLE PIECES (late show)

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Fronted by Herman Jolly (late of Sunset Valley), Little Pieces are a trio boasting a classic power pop sound in abundance. At times recalling the work of Tom Petty ("The Zeppo Stone") and ELO ("Hurricane") and buoyed by Jolly's amicable vocal work, the group rushes forward with little to no hesitation, occasionally throwing in stark lyrical images that serve as a point of contrast for the strummed and jangly rhythms. At its core, this is ideal music for the tail end of summer—and Labor Day be damned, there's still another week to go before the equinox falls. TC

TREES, HOUSE OF LOW CULTURE, MAMIFFER, HEMINGWAY

(Someday Lounge, 125 NW 5th) Tonight sees local drone provocateurs Trees put their verbose abortion of a CD to wax, so let's look to art school alumni to explore new mediums of experimental composition. Neither House of Low Culture's Aaron Turner nor Mamiffer's Faith Coloccia majored in music, and for that, we are lucky. Turner's post-metal Isis could be less excessive; only his hardcore roots and unmusical man-bark keep the celebrated troupe from becoming audio chess. Tonight's rare show with side project House of Low Culture will swap cultish measurement for a live score, sure to uncork the ink-splat half of this printmaker's mind. Look closely to see blood engulfing a hotel lobby. Meanwhile, Coloccia's self-trained piano songs are depressively playful—snapshots from a better day. With collaborators Turner and members of These Arms Are Snakes, she strains toward a high heaven of angelic organ and meaningful found sound on Hirror Enniffer, her debut album as Mamiffer. But in all that hope, her gravity proves the strongest weight. MIKE MEYER

SATURDAY 9/13

ALEJANDRO ESCOVEDO, CARRIE RODRIGUEZ

(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) A few years back, Alejandro Escovedo had a scare with Hepatitis C, and for an awful moment it looked as if we might lose one of America's very best songwriters. Today Escovedo's completely free of the disease and is riding high on his recent album, Real Animal. He just played the Democratic National Convention, but tonight he'll be playing his incredible songs in a much more intimate venue—you'll want to be there. NL

THE PRIDS BENEFIT: SUPER XX MAN, TEA FOR JULIE, LEIGH MARBLE & MORE

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) As you undoubtedly know, our good friends and Portland musical mainstays the Prids were in a very serious accident during their recent tour. Lend a hand for their medical expenses and get entertainment to boot at this benefit show featuring performances by a slew of local bands, including Tea for Julie, the Online Romance, Go Fever, Reporter, Jon Garcia, and more! WSH

31KNOTS, LACKTHEREOF, ROOT BEER & FRENCH FRY

(Someday Lounge, 125 NW 5th) See The Worried and the Well.

JOHNNY MATHIS WITH THE OREGON SYMPHONY

(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) An impeccable pop generalist, Johnny Mathis has served up polished standards for half a century, imbuing them with a soft-served gush and theatricality that's been long since abandoned by Billboard chart aspirants. His style chafes as many as it charms with its grave sincerity and fanciful arrangements, as on lilting classics "Wonderful! Wonderful!" and "Chances Are." He doesn't deviate much from that template on his new album, the extra-produced A Night to Remember. Although tailor-made for Mathis' peer group and the adult contemporary crowd, it captures the 72-year-old vocalist relatively undiminished, and this Oregon Symphony pairing should allow for a faithful, synth-free tour through Mathis' catalogue. JALYLAH BURRELL

GRAND ARCHIVES

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Instead of the old indie themes of devastation and isolation, Seattle's Grand Archives come up with a sweeter slice of musical pie: beautiful, uplifting orchestrations that overflow with harmonious vocals and peppy details like whistling and harmonica playing. Mat Brooke, formerly of Band of Horses and Carissa's Wierd, joined four others in the formation of the band that's currently signed with Sub Pop; their first album, The Grand Archives, came out earlier this year. Fans of Grand Archives include members of Modest Mouse, who showed their interest by plucking the band for support on a previous West Coast tour. KAITLIN JOHNSON

RYKARDA PARASOL AND THE TOWER RAVENS, MAGICK DAGGERS, GARLAND RAY PROJECT

(Fez Ballroom, 316 SW 11th) San Francisco's moody goth-folk collective Rykarda Parasol and the Tower Ravens have got more than a few things going for them. Their arsenal is rife with Jim Jarmusch-esque musical imagery: Reverb-dripping whammy-bar leads anchor saloon-piano vignettes, all cemented by Parasol's sinister vocals. Her rustic croon (the female counterpoint to a broodier Nick Cave) sounds as if it could crumble under the weight of its own vulnerability; it's less the focal point for lyrical profundity as it is the lead instrument in her catalog. When live with the potent Tower Ravens, Rykarda Parasol employs only as much enthusiasm as it would take to roust a crew of zombies at a cemetery set—gravely gothic and extremely good. RJP

ALINA SIMONE

(Funky Church, 2456 SE Tamarack) Siberian cult icon Yanka Dyagileva was a folk-punk-poet whose underground status rivals Nico or Patti Smith in her barren homeland; after her mysterious death in 1991, Yanka's music continued to be distributed non-commercially through dubbed mix tapes. While walking in New York City's Brighton Beach neighborhood, Alina Simone happened upon one of these rare tapes. Born in the Ukraine and fluent in Russian, Simone was touched by Yanka's poetic recounts of Cold War-era Soviet life and the raw simplicity found in her primitive works. Paying homage, Simone released a collection of Yanka covers entitled Everyone Is Crying Out to Me, Beware. Championed for her breathy, decadent vocal range, Simone transforms Yanka's lo-fi originals into modern indie rock ballads with an Eastern European flair. Sung entirely in Russian, Simone's potent emotive voice surpasses language barriers, carrying Yanka's story straight through the soul. EM BROWNLOWE

POSEIDON, GODS & KINGS, THE PENALTY KILLERS, SUBURBAN KORNER KICK

(Red Room, 2530 NE 82nd) Suburban Korner Kick's debut album, Option B: To Linger, Remain or Persist..., comes handsomely packaged in a deluxe cardboard case, complete with numerous fold-out pictures of planets attached to a swivel hinge. (It's a little difficult to get the disc out of the damn thing, but no matter.) Such elaborate trappings seem at odds with the Seattle duo's minimal garage rock: Each song generally consists of a couple chords getting to know each other very well over the course of a minute or two. A few acoustic-based numbers sound like Jethro Tull crossed with Modest Mouse. Suburban Korner Kick's tight playing gives each lean song a sense of purpose, even if none of the album's songs are as immediately memorable as its fancy, impractical packaging. NL

SAW WHET, AH HOLLY FAM'LY, GREY ANNE

(The Waypost, 3120 N Williams) If this triple threat of pretty, expertly crafted folk is anything to go by, I'll be hauling my butt to the Waypost more often. Grey Anne's understated, emotive folk seems almost effortless, and Becky Dawson (performing tonight as Saw Whet and with Ah Holly Fam'ly) sounds uncannily like Jolie Holland. Dawson's voice is unstoppably soulful, and her melodies have a classic structure—imagine Cat Power's take on a traditional Irish melody and you're not too far off the mark. Devendra-esque freak folk knockoffs have thankfully come and gone, but with any luck, artists like Ah Holly Fam'ly—who make truly experimental folk music—can pick up the moniker and keep it safe for us all. HANNAH CARLEN

SUNDAY 9/14

TBA FESTIVAL: TINY TBA

(Leftbank, 240 N Broadway) See Destination Fun.

TBA FESTIVAL: THIRD ANGLE NEW MUSIC ENSEMBLE

(Keller Fountain, SW 3rd & Clay) See Destination Fun.

ANDRE NICKATINA, THE JACKA

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) The Jacka is a rapper from Bay Area collective the Mob Figaz, underground enough to not have a Wikipedia page in 2008—yet they've been putting it down since 1999, when they were put on the scene by no less than controversially hardcore Cali icon C-Bo. Kind of surprising, really, considering Jacka's easy hooks and bold-breezy-boastful flow on the seriously thoro (and thoroughly bumpable) 2005 LP The Jack Artist. Coming from such turf-toed West Coast lineage, Jacka could easily be of NYC pedigree; as different as the Yay Area's native mobb music and Mobb Deep's QB soliloquies are, Jacka has a criminally slept-on vibe that unexpectedly combines the best instincts of both. Hella filthy, dun. LARRY MIZELL JR.

BLEED THE SKY, DESTRO, GIGAN, PROVEN, COUNTERWEIGHT

(Rock n Roll Pizza, 11140 SE Powell) All progressive rock, most technical death metal, and some modern art rock share the same problem: total proficiency. It hurts to be on the receiving end of the wrong King Crimson record, and it's impossible to listen to Cryptopsy. Also: Tortoise. (Did you just throw the fuck up?) If you're in a band, just don't practice all the time. There are exceptions. Tampa's Gigan are the best, best band currently touring the metal clubs, and they have even released a catchy album. The Order of the False Eye is a showy blast of Zappa influence, Possessed-era Larry LaLonde-isms, time-signature mutilation, and the nuclear obliteration of the world. On "Still Image Symphony," a spaceship lands on our smoldering planet; the pilot emerges and sounds some kind of alien victory gong. Tonight, lose yourself in defeat. MM

MONDAY 9/15

SQUEEZE, THERESA ANDERSSON

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) I like late '70s English pop... YOU like late '70s English pop. And that's why everybody loves Squeeze. The last time I saw them perform, it was a pleasantly jarring surprise—because I had forgotten what a pop juggernaut these guys were! "Tempted," "Black Coffee in Bed," and more will be provided by a classic band that refuses to stop with the pop. WSH

TUESDAY 9/16

DOES IT OFFEND YOU YEAH?, TEAM ROBESPIERRE

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Somewhere in the orbit of M83 and Ratatat, Does it Offend You, Yeah? are new electric pop from across the pond. They are danceable, surly, and their beats have that big electric fuzz that all the kids seem to be into today. Plus, they've already started their remix career with a banging track by the Faint. PAC

SPIRITUALIZED, GRAND OLE PARTY

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) See Bits of Truth.

THE RACONTEURS, THE KILLS

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) It's looking more and more like Jack White is going to shed his Stripes altogether: Meg White's anxiety apparently scotched the last White Stripes tour, and this spring Jack White's other band the Raconteurs rush-released their second album, Consolers of the Lonely, without any advance notice, in a welcome and surprising circumvention of the typical big-record release process. White first started playing with Jack Lawrence and Patrick Keeler of the Greenhornes on Loretta Lynn's 2004 Van Lear Rose album, but the warmhearted, breezy collaboration of that record has given way to a fuzzy radio-ready rock sound with the addition of power popper Brendan Benson to the mix. The second Raconteurs album is no improvement over their compact debut—it's thunky, sprawling, and entirely unsurprising—but as evidenced by their two sold-out shows this week, White hasn't lost any listeners along the way. NL

WEDNESDAY 9/17

ALIEN BOY FUNDRAISER: CALVIN JOHNSON, AH HOLLY FAM'LY, TENDER FOREVER

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Brian Lindstrom's upcoming film Alien Boy examines the death of James Chasse, the Portland man who died under sketchy circumstances in police custody in 2006. True, Mercury news writer Matt Davis is one of the writers of the film—but we'd be recommending tonight's benefit for Alien Boy even if Matt wasn't involved, seeing as how there'll be great music from Calvin Johnson, Ah Holly Fam'ly, and Tender Forever. EH

THE RACONTEURS, THE KILLS

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) See Tuesday's listing.

SEXYWATERSPIDERS, SOMEDAY TRICYCLE, THE BLACKLIGHTS, STRAWBERRY SUNSHINE

(Satyricon, 125 NW 6th Ave) Sexywaterspiders' name is almost good enough to carry them, but with their slow and seductive way of drumming, strumming and singing, the moniker need only be the lure. Meanwhile, local rock gem Someday Tricycle's first album, Mystic Knights of the Pretty Sun, packs together a pretty slew of finely constructed, solid songs—and another record is already on the way. While they sound a little something like most of their laundry list of influences (Air, the Beatles, Elliott Smith), there's something purely Someday Tricycle in there as well, and that distinction makes them a very happy listen. KJ