Love in the Time of Kool-Aid

Is Taking to the Streets Obsolete?

Comments

1
Thank you for bringing to light what I have often thought of protest marches in the twenty first century. Especially in majority liberal cities such as Portland. Though showing solidarity is a positive thing that gives us all of the feels, these days it doesn't change the fabric of society. Much like calling Trump Towers and complaining to the underpaid staff doesn't change national policy. Money talks, and donating, volunteering or working for an organization that can help how the government and society works is step number one. Strikes still work, as they genuinely interrupt commerce. But hacktivism is most likely the wave of the future. A focused effort of modern methods can bring about greater change than a well meaning street protest in this brave new world.
2
Damn right and about damn time someone put this into writing. There's no reason not to march, but the real work is not in the march, it's empowering your community, showing them you care, showing them that their participation matters, and keeping the politicians on their toes and in line with the demands of the people. To be clear, when I say "the people" I mean people who do not draw lines at skin color/sexual orientation/ability/class or any other silly category that keeps us afraid of each other.
3
Hey Tone Police.
Lots of us that march or disrupt city council also do community outreach and spend countless hours quietly doing this.
Nobody really pays attention, including you.
4
In your introduction to Olivia Olivia’s provocative piece “Is Taking to the Streets Obsolete?”, you posit two opinions: “marching as vital to maintaining democracy” vs “those who believe it accomplishes nothing.” I suggest a third opinion: that rallies and marches most importantly impact those who participate and view the mobilizations. Protests allow us to feel, up close and personal -- audibly, visibly and tangibly – our connection to others who feel the way we do. The larger the demonstration, the more powerfully it builds our confidence. Does it change the politicians’ direction? Not necessarily. But history shows us -- Egypt in 2011, Paris in 1968, Russia in 1917 – that mass demonstrations can inspire the combativeness needed to bring our most powerful weapons into the struggle: civil disobedience, occupations, boycotts, blockades, strikes.
Jamie Partridge