Worth a Thousand Homes

Maps Offer a Sobering Look at Four Decades of Gentrification

Comments

1
Back in the '60s, integration was touted as the answer to discrimination or racism. Now, integration is being lamented as gentrification. Was Jiminy Carter right when he said?: "I have nothing against a community that is made up of people who are Polish, or who are Czechoslovakians, or who are French Canadians or who are blacks trying to maintain the ethnic purity of their neighborhoods. This is a natural inclination."
2
Which is racism, segregation or gentrification?
3
Gentrification is rarely inclusive. It actually discludes people, thats what the complaints are about. Google "displacement" and "gentrification" at the same time homeboy. And nobody ever said the treatment of Eastern Europeans was just or ethical in the 1920s or 1930s. They were displaced plenty too, but that was a fight for the earlier days. We live in 2014.
4
Dare say old boy, is Oakland gentrified or integrated? Has Portland been ethnically cleansed, or is there more diversity today than in 1975? How can there be integration without any displacement? Everybody is still around somewhere? Are new ghettos growing somewhere else?
5
I hear that the economy is booming in North Dakota. Maybe all the Afro-Americans are moving over there?
6
All that Black Gold!
7
In the Black Hills!
8
Oh, wait. The Black Hills are in The South Dakota.
9
According to the article, Portland is becoming less "black". Is this because people are leaving, or because of the large influx of people Portland has experienced over the last 20 years, diluting those that were already here?

The maps themselves do not establish that there is a problem. They can be interpreted in many ways, but they could suggest that N Portland is becoming more desegregated.