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Dear Pot Lawyer,

What is going on with industrial hemp in Oregon?

Industrial hemp regulation has been going through a series of rapid shifts since 2016, when the Oregon legislature adopted a two-tier system that allowed for the registration of industrial hemp growers (producers) and handlers (processors). At the time, only hemp handlers could sell industrial hemp products. This changed last year, when Governor Kate Brown signed into law SB 1015, which allows industrial hemp to enter into the recreational cannabis supply line.

Just before the new year, the OLCC adopted amendments to its administrative rules on cannabis that implemented SB 1015, providing much needed guidance on the new hemp regime. First and foremost, the term “industrial hemp” refers to any cannabis plants with a THC concentration below 0.3 percent. Hemp growers and handlers can apply to the OLCC for an industrial hemp certificate ($500 per year, plus a $250 application fee) to transfer hemp to recreational processors, and handlers can also receive a certificate to transfer their hemp concentrates and hemp extracts to recreational processors.

In turn, recreational processors can apply for a special “endorsement” that will allow them to accept hemp and hemp products from the handlers and growers, create hemp concentrates or extracts with a THC concentration below 5 percent, incorporate hemp concentrates or extracts into “marijuana items,” and sell those products to other OLCC processors, wholesalers, and retailers. OLCC retailers can then turn around and sell these hemp-based products to Oregon consumers.

None of this answers the question that we receive most often from industrial hemp producers: “Can I sell my industrial hemp products outside of Oregon?” It goes without saying that OLCC retailers must sell locally, so any hemp products transferred into the recreational supply chain can only be sold in Oregon. Hemp outside of the recreational chain is regulated by the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA). The ODA’s rules are surprisingly wide open when it comes to the sale of industrial hemp products. Under OAR 603-048-0100, a hemp handler can sell hemp products “to any person.” The ODA’s rules make no reference to whether that sale must occur in Oregon.

While interstate sales of hemp products may be legal in Oregon in certain circumstances, federal law on the issue is anything but clear. The DEA has taken the position that any concentrate or extract derived from the flower, leaves, or resin of any plant of the cannabis family, regardless of relative THC concentration, is a Schedule 1 drug and therefore prohibited across state lines. In contrast, the mature stalks of such a plant and fiber from such stalks, as well as oils or cake derived from hemp seeds or stalks are not included in the federal definition of marijuana and subject to federal prohibition. There is currently a lawsuit pending before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals that is challenging the DEA’s position, and we can hope that the court will provide a bit of guidance in this area. For now, we still advise our clients to keep their products in Oregon.


Got a question? Email us at potlawyer@portlandmercury.com. And remember that if you have a legal problem, contact a lawyer! Our educational musings cannot be relied upon as specific legal advice.