Jeff Wong

Thanks to the recent spurts of sunny weather, flowers are blooming and layers are shedding. And if you’re like me, you don’t buy anything seasonally appropriate until the weather calls for it—and after a few sunny days, I’m ready to spring-clean my wardrobe to make room for new goodies. So as you can imagine, I was thrilled to get an invite to the MOORE Custom Goods’ shop-the-runway spring/summer 2018 fashion show.

It’s no secret that I’m a MOORE fan, so when I heard designer Andrea Moore Beaulieu was throwing her first solo show, I couldn’t wait to get there. The invite promised live performances by R&B/synthpop group Talk Modern, street-smart moves from Northwest Dance Project, and grub from Tight Tacos. Not only a fashion show, it was also a fundraiser for the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).

Following an enjoyable (though lengthy) set from Talk Modern, MOORE finally hit the runway with 45 looks broken into three acts, with Northwest Dance Project (outfitted in MOORE) entertaining us between intervals.

Act one provided floral print underwear that’s designed to be seen, layering them under clear rain jackets, mesh tops, and sagging sweatpants. Though knits dominate Moore’s collection, the tailored pieces are always noteworthy because of the high level of craftsmanship (as seen in a blood red moto jacket). The floral print was present in every look of act one, and by the end I fantasized seeing myself in a floral tee with matching shorts that harmonized beneath a clear raincoat.

Jeff Wong
Jeff Wong

Act two brought more of a muted palette of gray, black, white, and beige mixed into stripes and color blocking. I especially liked the ’90s nostalgia of the relaxed fit color-blocked tees and deconstructed cropped tops. My favorite pieces were a dolman-sleeved turtleneck that was perfectly constructed into a modern fit, and an exaggerated utility belt with the MOORE logo cascading from waist to ankles.

Jeff Wong
Jeff Wong

There were some great tailored pieces in act three, such as cropped trousers and muted color-blocked button-ups. I died for the white-striped sheer organza kaftan that lightly pushed away from the body. A clean, crisp edge was countered with a raw, frayed hem, and the red plisse fabric was a nice choice to liven things up, especially on an off-the-shoulder asymmetrical dress that closed the show.

Jeff Wong
Jeff Wong

In retrospect, I would’ve edited some of the styling, such as the white wigs, which cheapened the overall look, and clear handbags full of cash also felt out of place. In addition, the shoe choices didn’t make sense with the overall vibe: MOORE is known for gender neutral clothing that’s inspired by street wear, but a majority of female models were in heels, while male models were in sneakers or slides. It felt too conventional for such a forward-thinking brand. In the designer’s defense, the styling problem probably stemmed from attempting to present 45 looks. A collection this large is a colossal undertaking for a small design house. But editing out a third to half of this collection, Beaulieu could have focused her viewpoint. That many looks saturate a designer’s statements and water-down the presentation—and with fewer looks, statements have more punch.

Styling aside, there were so many great wearable pieces that I think anyone could find something to lust after—I know I have a list. Even though you won’t see me in a crop-top anytime soon, I will most definitely be adding more MOORE to my summer wardrobe. Beat me to MOORE’s storefront if you can.


MOORE Custom Goods, 7 SE 28th, wearmoore.com