Film Shorts 

In Which We Hit It and Quit It

click to enlarge STAR TREK II: THE WRATH OF KHAN Rest in peace, Ricardo Montalban. Rest in peace.

STAR TREK II: THE WRATH OF KHAN Rest in peace, Ricardo Montalban. Rest in peace.

recommended 8 1/2
Fellini's much-loved 1963 classic, back on the big screen with a new 35mm print. Clinton Street Theater.

recommended Animal Kingdom
See review this issue. Fox Tower 10.

Avatar: Special Edition 3D
The ridiculously successful film ($2.7 billion worldwide box office!) gets a rerelease, now with eight minutes of new footage. Fingers crossed for more wacky Giovanni Ribisi hijinx! Century 16 Cedar Hills Crossing, Century Clackamas Town Center, Cinetopia, Lloyd Center 10 Cinema.

Bollywood Bike-In
Bollywood flicks screened outside, with proceeds going to the Q Center and Mercy Corps. This week: 1965's Guide. The Q Center.

recommended Calvin Marshall
See review this issue. Filmmakers in attendance for 6:45 pm shows on Friday, August 27-Saturday, August 28. Living Room Theaters.

Docupalooza
A screening of all the films from this year's Project Youth Doc, Film Action Oregon's "intensive, four-week-long documentary film production program for teens ages 13-16." Hollywood Theatre.

recommended Jean-Michel Basquiat: The Radiant Child
Comedy and TV director Tamra Davis (Billy Madison, Half Baked, that one movie starring Britney Spears) was a friend of artist Jean-Michel Basquiat when she filmed an interview with him two years before his drug overdose at age 27. Until recently Davis' footage, which also shows Basquiat goofing off in the studio, dancing, and playing with small dogs, was shelved—until Davis realized, after unearthing it, that she had the impetus for a definitive documentary of the tragic artist's life and work. Though clearly meant in tribute, and perhaps (not unnecessarily) glossing over some of the more sordid aspects of his last years, Jean-Michel Basquiat: The Radiant Child undeniably achieves a convincing argument for Basquiat's artistic contributions, educating the viewer on his background, preoccupations, process, and flaws. MARJORIE SKINNER Northwest Film Center's Whitsell Auditorium.

recommended The Last Exorcism
See review this issue. Various Theaters.

Life During Wartime
See review this issue. Hollywood Theatre.

Lottery Ticket
Li'l Bow Wow wins the lottery! Not screened for critics. Various Theaters.

Lourdes
My understanding is that being in a wheelchair is extremely sad, awkward, and boring. Lourdes—which focuses around a multiple-sclerosis sufferer's religious pilgrimage—manages to embody those feelings perfectly. Lourdes was shot on location in southwestern France, where millions of sick and disabled people travel every year hoping to experience a miraculous religious cure. Sure, the film is beautifully photographed, and yes, it tackles its nuanced subject matter with ample delicacy and consideration, but 50 percent of the movie is just slow, wide, static shots of people in wheelchairs shuffling in and out of various rooms. Some may find this dull. (I did.) ANDREW "THE INTERN" MICHAAN Northwest Film Center's Whitsell Auditorium.

Mao's Last Dancer
See review this issue. Fox Tower 10.

recommended Mesrine: Killer Instinct
See review this issue. Cinema 21.

Nostalgic Paranoia: Short Videos and Random Observations by Karl Lind
A selection of works from local filmmaker and videographer Karl Lind. Grand Detour.

The Other Guys
There's remarkably little to say about The Other Guys: Will Ferrell and Marky Mark play underdog cops who try to solve an irrelevant mystery. There are lame jokes ("Where'd you learn to drive like that?" "Grand Theft Auto!"), easy gags (an old lady talking dirty), and wacky contrivances (it's funny that Eva Mendes' character is married to Will Ferrell's character, you see, because she is attractive and he is not). If you get stuck with The Other Guys on an airplane, it will mostly be more entertaining than SkyMall. ERIK HENRIKSEN Various Theaters.

Peepli Live
A Sundance-approved Indian comedy. Not screened for critics. Fox Tower 10.

recommended Piranha 3D
This is the type of movie where naked hang gliders get their legs devoured, where someone pukes into the camera, and where Jerry O'Connell has his penis ripped off, eaten, and then belched into the audience (in lovingly rendered 3D). It's the type of movie where cops say, "I'm too old for this" and warn spring-break revelers not to go in the water only to be rebuked by some slammin' party jams after someone shouts, "Hit it, DJ Chocolate Thunder!" It's the type of movie where Richard Dreyfuss gets sucked into a whirlpool and Christopher Lloyd rants about fish reproductive organs. DAVE BOW Various Theaters.

recommended Please Give
Nicole Holofcener makes complex, thoughtful movies about women. About female friendships, in the cult classic Walking and Talking; about female self-image, in the underrated Lovely and Amazing; about female careers, in the capable Friends with Money. With her newest, Please Give, Holofcener makes it clear from the film's opening moments that her focus hasn't changed: The credits roll over a montage of naked breasts, varied and unshapely and a little uncomfortable as they're weighed and smooshed into mammogram machines. ALISON HALLETT Bagdad Theater, Kennedy School, Mission Theater.

recommended Scott Pilgrim vs. the World
Bryan Lee O'Malley's comic book series is a fantastic epic: an earnest, heady, hilarious mashup of comics, videogames, and music, with doses of the confusion, enthusiasm, and melancholy that're embedded in the DNA of every twentysomething. The good news: The movie version, directed by Edgar Wright, lives up to expectations. The better news: Wright's film also does a few things nobody could've predicted. From its opening moments—when a Universal logo rendered in NES-era pixels appears—it's clear there hasn't been a movie like this before. Thanks to Scott Pilgrim, the lines between film, comics, pop music, and videogames have been blurred—in all of the best ways. ERIK HENRIKSEN Various Theaters.

recommended Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
"If I may be so bold, it was a mistake for you to accept promotion. Commanding a starship is your first, best destiny; anything else is a waste of material." See My, What a Busy Week! Bagdad Theater.

The Switch
Jennifer Aniston is a fancy New York lady with a vaguely referenced job in television. Jason Bateman is her best friend, with a vaguely referenced job on Wall Street. By the ineluctable logic of romantic comedies, he's in love with her, but because he's a neurotic control freak, he doesn't know it. The boyfriend-less Aniston is worried that she's reached the end of her foaling years, so she decides to go the artificial insemination route. Vetoing Bateman as a potential spermy daddy, she picks a donor and throws an "insemination party," at which the donor is invited to fill a cup with his "offering," as the movie primly calls it. The offering is left in a cup in the bathroom, soon to be implanted in... you know, Jennifer Aniston. But Jason Bateman has had too much to drink. And some hippie gave him some drugs. And he sees the donor's sperm cup in the bathroom. And he dumps it out. And refills it. And... he insemirapes Jennifer Aniston. The movie has no idea how fucked up this is. ALISON HALLETT Various Theaters.

Takers
A thriller about a bunch of bank robbers, starring Hayden "Anakin" Christensen and Chris "Punchy" Brown. Various Theaters.

Video Gong Show
Film Action Oregon's fun-sounding, four-round competition for local filmmakers takes place at various bars around the city. More info: hollywoodtheatre.org. The Woods.

A View to a Kill
The 1985 Bond flick, featuring Christopher Walken, a Duran Duran theme song, and a geriatric Roger Moore. Laurelhurst Theater.

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