TOWERS Fri 2/7 East End

WEDNESDAY 2/5

EAR CANDY: SUMMER CANNIBALS, GRANDHORSE
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See My, What a Busy Week!

ONEOHTRIX POINT NEVER, DAWN OF MIDI
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Daniel Lopatin's music is as impossible to pin down as he is (multiple attempts to secure an interview with the Brooklyn-based artist for this publication proved fruitless). Recording as Oneohtrix Point Never, Lopatin can lull you into a weird calm with warm New Age-like synth tones right after he's terrified you with a blast of overdriven beats and parched noise. His latest album, R Plus Seven, threatens to be his most accessible collection yet, but he manages to upend those expectations with some truly freaked-out Philip Glass-like repetitions and ambient tracks that could be an alternate soundtrack to Andrei Tarkovsky's hypnotically creepy sci-fi films. Lopatin is billing his current run of West Coast dates as a full audio-visual experience, so prepare yourself for potential sensory overload. ROBERT HAM

THE MENZINGERS, OFF WITH THEIR HEADS, BROADWAY CALLS, LEE COREY OSWALD
(Branx, 320 SE 2nd) The Menzingers' first album for Epitaph, 2012's On the Impossible Past, remains a brightly burning candle that may not ever go out. The Scranton (it is a real place!), Pennsylvania, four-piece makes punk that's laced with the kind of sugar-blast hooks that you'll find in bowls of brightly colored cereal, and the sort of sweat-stained, ragged melodies you'll find on Bruce Springsteen's ass bandana. In other words, the Menzingers' loveable, hyperactive pop cultivates true, deep-down affection. Tonight's all-ages crowd will no doubt be filled with kids (and more than a fair share of grinning grownups, too) who can howl along to every refrain of "I will fuck this up/I fucking know it" from "The Obituaries." If you're not one of them yet, one listen to On the Impossible Past might just convert you. NED LANNAMANN

THURSDAY 2/6

HUSTLE AND DRONE, HOSANNAS, MOTHERTAPES
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

KID CONGO AND THE PINK MONKEY BIRDS, CHEAP TIME, THE SUICIDE NOTES
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Kid Congo Powers' pedigree is enough to make you take notice. He was a co-founder of bluesy punk freaks the Gun Club, and was later recruited by the Cramps and Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds. For the past five years, Powers has taken the zazz and sleaze of those bands and put it into his own project, the Pink Monkey Birds, who just released their third record on In the Red. Joining Kid Congo are labelmates Cheap Time, who—led by the band's only consistent member, Jeffrey Novak—have been cranking out hook-laden garage rock since 2006. Last year's excellent Exit Smiles doesn't miss a single stumbling step. There's a good chance you'll be stumbling out of here tonight, too. MARK LORE

SECRET CHIEFS 3, ATOMIC APE
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Instrumental outfit Secret Chiefs 3 are one of the most peculiar groups in existence. Conceived by lunatic/genius Trey Spruance—formerly of Mr. Bungle—the Chiefs' sound is a combination of innumerable musical heritages, including, but not limited to, surf, metal, electronic, folk, and a variety of world musics. In 2007, the group's baffling eclecticism was taken several steps further when it was declared that Secret Chiefs 3 was actually an umbrella for seven distinct bands that each represent a unique musical interest of Spruance's. If this just screams "prog" to you, it's because it is the 21st century equivalent—but Spruance as a composer is the real deal, and there's a raw, inescapable passion here that's a far cry from the meandering, hollow craftsmanship that defines pretty much every other neo-prog band (we see you, Dream Theater!). MORGAN TROPER

PETER ROWAN
(Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta) Peter Rowan is a legend of roots music; the Massachusetts native has been a pioneering force in bluegrass and Americana for more than 50 years. He's a Grammy winner, a renowned songwriter, and a tireless bandleader whose adventurous spirit—from his newgrass work in the 1970s to more recent explorations of reggae and rockabilly—flies in the face of the place he started: traditional bluegrass. So Rowan doesn't need to ride anyone's coattails, but it's still interesting to note that he's one of a very few musicians who played with both the father of bluegrass, Bill Monroe, and the furry face of the Grateful Dead, Jerry Garcia. Rowan joined Monroe's Blue Grass Boys in 1965 before going solo, and in the early '70s, he teamed with Garcia in the influential bluegrass supergroup Old and in the Way. Monroe and Garcia are long gone, but Rowan rolls along. BEN SALMON

PHILLIP COHRAN
(Hollywood Theatre, 4122 NE Sandy) Phil Cohran has sidestepped conventional jazz (and funk) almost from day one, most notably during his time as part of Sun Ra's Arkestra in the early '60s. Known mostly as a trumpeter, Cohran has also dabbled with other instruments, including the zither. His contributions with that instrument can be heard all over Sun Ra's 1965 LP Angels and Demons at Play. It was his brief time in the Arkestra that pushed him to become a talented composer and producer in his own right as bandleader of the Artistic Heritage Ensemble. Part of Mississippi Records' Music and Film Series, tonight's presentation will include a slideshow and lecture, which will be followed by a performance from Cohran on various instruments. The cosmos aligns in Portland tonight. ML

FRIDAY 2/7

AND AND AND, BRITE LINES, TIBURONES
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) See My, What a Busy Week!

EYELIDS, 1939 ENSEMBLE, THE VERNER PANTONS
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Eyelids.

TOWERS, ORDER OF THE GASH, LEFT BLANK, DJ BOOZE CRUIZE
(East End, 203 SE Grand) Bassist Rick Duncan and drummer Darryl Swan have been making music together for almost nine years—first as members of the Troglodytes, and, since 2009, as the rage-driven Towers. That shared history is what makes the duo's upcoming album II (out February 11 on Eolian Empire) so brutal and intense. The sludgy sci-fi metal works beautifully, letting the low-end attack of their bass-and-drums sound crack open your skull so as to more easily inject Duncan's rasping vocals and warped noise. The combined effect recalls fellow heavy rock explorers like Melvins and Voivod, and could potentially do your head in, Scanners-style. RH

ANARCHY IN LITTLE BEIRUT: THE THORNES, WHISKEY DICKERS, ROTTIES, THE EX-GIRLFRIENDS CLUB, & MORE
(Ash Street Saloon, 225 SW Ash) In just under an hour, the new Anarchy in Little Beirut compilation CD crams 21 of Portland's brashest, snarliest, snappiest punk bands into a definitive snapshot of the current state of PDX punk. (Spoiler: The state is fast, loud, rip-snorting, and surprisingly diverse.) The tracklist runs the gamut from local legends to young upstarts—Hammered Grunts, Don't, the Cry!, and the Ex-Girlfriends Club are just some of the many names on the back cover—and tonight 10 of those bands celebrate the CD's lurching, ear-damaging release into this world. Best of all, the $7 cover charge lands you a free copy of Anarchy in Little Beirut to take home. NL

GABRIEL SALOMAN, VALET, BEAST, ETHERNET
(Alberta Abbey, 126 NE Alberta) Unlike Pete Swanson, his former counterpart in Yellow Swans, Gabriel Saloman's work in the years since that band's split has become quieter and cleaner, but is still as powerful as ever. And the music he is composing now is unapologetically political. Most recently it's come in the form of Soldier's Requiem, a 2013 release whose tracks were originally composed to accompany an anti-war expression choreographed by a Vancouver, BC-based dance company. Its four pieces each devastate in their own way, whether it's through the pound of a martial drumbeat or, on the haunting "Boots on the Ground," guitar melodies accompanied by the simple sound of rainfall that are interrupted by more percussion racket and heavy drones. RH

THE CALEB KLAUDER COUNTRY BAND
(Alberta Street Pub, 1036 NE Alberta) There's been no shortage of love for the Caleb Klauder Country Band in these pages, but don't expect that to end anytime soon. That's because the tight, twanging ensemble is simply one of the best live bands in Portland—and one of the best country bands in the country, for that matter. Tonight they sidle across Northeast Portland from their usual haunt at the Spare Room to the handsome new showroom in the refurbished Alberta Street Pub. Expect the place to be packed to the gills, as it's a completely free show, and expect the floor to proudly earn some new boot scuffs, as there is absolutely zero chance people will be standing still. Bring a date or don't, but if you still haven't seen Klauder & Co. in action, you're missing one of the best nights of the year. NL

SATURDAY 2/8

NUGGETS NIGHT VII
(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) See My, What a Busy Week!

LADY RIZO
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) See My, What a Busy Week!

ANCIENT WARLOCKS, PRINCESS, BLACKWITCH PUDDING
(Club 21, 2035 NE Glisan) Read our article on Princess.

MICHAEL SCHENKER GROUP, GUNDRIVER, GARDEN OF EDEN
(Tonic Lounge, 3100 NE Sandy) Michael Schenker is the best kind of professional musician, a modest one who appears to be in it for the music. He's had his fingers in many classic, legendary rock 'n' roll/heavy metal pies over the years—including Scorpions, UFO, and his own bands—but he flies under the radar not looking to gain new fans or conquer the world. Many guitar players cite Schenker as an influence, but he tours small clubs that can barely fit 300 people instead of arenas like some of his counterparts. Despite the lack of limelight shining in his direction, Schenker's Temple of Rock released Bridge the Gap earlier this year. Ex-Rainbow vocalist Doogie Wright's Dio impression on the record is a little bothersome at times, but Schenker's tasteful, soulful, spectacular leads and riffs overshadow any weakness the record might have. ARIS WALES

MOVEMENT: WISP, THE JOURNEY MEN, DAVE BATE, HONEYDRIPPER, XNOR
(Blue Monk, 3341 SE Belmont) Often compared to Aphex Twin, Wisp (Reid Dunn) has been making music on his computer since 1999, racking up countless releases on iconic record labels including the legendary Rephlex Records. In that prolific body of work, Dunn has kept the spirit of IDM and breakcore alive and well, effortlessly blending complex rhythms and intricate melodies in extraordinary compositions that go beyond what much of contemporary electronica has given us in recent times. Breaking the stereotype of repetition and monotony, Dunn provides us with a new perspective on electronic music, giving a glimpse of what is possible when the mind merges with music and technology. CHRISTINA BROUSSARD

PALS FEST FUNDRAISER: THE WE SHARED MILK, SAMA DAMS
(Firkin Tavern, 1937 SE 11th) PALS Fest, hosted by the infamous house-show hosts, PALS Clubhouse, is going to be a week long this summer, presented at different venues throughout town, including the Firkin Tavern. Seeing a show at the Firk is almost like being at PALS itself—you'll find yourself surrounded by a cheap-beer-drinking, sing-alonging, rowdy crowd, and you'll feel the warmth of camaraderie. This last sentiment will be going strong tonight with three Portland favorites—the thrashing, poetic guitar rock of the We Shared Milk, the layered, delicate organ ballads of Sama Dams, and super secret PDX favorites to top it all off. Proceeds from the bar will go toward PALS Fest, so the higher your tab, the more fun this summer will be. RACHEL MILBAUER

SUNDAY 2/9

YOU WHO: URAL THOMAS AND THE PAIN
(Kennedy School, 5736 NE 33rd) See My, What a Busy Week!

HOSPITALITY, AIR WAVES, HONEY BUCKET
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Brooklyn's Hospitality released their Karl Blau-produced debut EP all the way back in 2008. That collection of charming pop songs, driven by vocalist/guitarist Amber Papini's skewed vocals and some refreshingly light and jazzy arrangements, managed to warp a seemingly twee exterior into something far more dynamic. It wasn't until 2012, when Merge released the trio's first self-titled album, that it became clear the band had been busy honing their sweet, smart melodic songwriting into something special. On their new album, Trouble, Papini balances out some of that saccharine with a heavy dose of melancholy. Shades of their debut can be heard in a song like "It's Not Serious," but the album feels uncompromising in style, unafraid to pull the listener though some beautifully dark passages. It's a rare treat to hear a band move far beyond their comfort zone and succeed as well as Hospitality does here. CHIPP TERWILLIGER

ALBATROSS, LEVON'S HELMET
(Rontoms, 600 E Burnside) Albatross started as a songwriting project for Ryan Sollee, the frontman for the Builders and the Butchers, who was charged with crafting songs for a play about a dinosaur that evolves into an albatross. The project eventually became its own band, and at first blush Albatross doesn't sound all that dissimilar from the Builders—dark acoustic ballads anchored by Sollee's slightly nasal delivery—but strings lend an extra bit of theatrical flair. Albatross has an album release show coming up later this month on February 20 (at Clyde's Prime Rib!), so this show may serve as something of a warm-up. They're playing with Levon's Helmet, the new power-pop band that features former members of Water Tower, and whose five-song EP deserves your attention. MATTHEW W. SULLIVAN

RYE WOLVES, HUNGERS, LAMPREY
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) Eugene, Oregon's Rye Wolves have developed the reputation of unsung doom-metal heroes during their nearly decade-long run. While not evolving the genre too much, the trio's destructive M.O. favors the sort of pummeling, sludgy riffs and impossibly long, meandering guitar dirges that make your knees buckle. Species Battle in the Branches, the band's 2011 three-song-long full-length, is chock full of mind-fucking psychedelic metal, guttural vocals, and meditative breakdowns not unlike those made almost-famous by yesteryear doomers Isis. That Rye Wolves have stuck to their guns and developed exponentially within the folds of their cloth is notable, and their cathartic live sets are not to be missed. RYAN J. PRADO

MONDAY 2/10

PEGGY SUE, MANDOLIN ORANGE, THE MARINER'S CHILDREN
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

TOUCHÉ AMORÉ, MEWITHOUTYOU, SEAHAVEN, DRUG CHURCH
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) Read our article on Touché Amoré.

INCAN ABRAHAM, SAMA DAMS, JOHN BOWERS
Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Incan Abraham is the kind of outfit that gets its start in LA, but could easily become popular in Portland. Self-described as "dream/world/pop/hypnotica," Incan Abraham takes on the soft percussive quality of indie bands like Local Natives, while also sounding dreamy and introspective, in a similar vein to Beirut. Tracks off of their upcoming album, Tolerance, play with things like accordion and syncopated rhythms. Don't expect to go to this show to get loaded and crush a Tecate can against your forehead, but you can reasonably assume you'll meet some cute girls and ponder your next big career move. ROSE FINN

FALLING IN REVERSE, ESCAPE THE FATE, CHELSEA GRIN, SURVIVE THIS
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) If you haven't listened to "Alone"—off of inconceivably inane metal-core band Falling in Reverse's latest LP Fashionably Late—you have yet to experience true sensory torment. It is half shitty post-hardcore, half shitty rap, and wholly awful. Falling in Reverse sounds like Norma Jean and Limp Bizkit had a child who was adopted and raised by One Direction. There is a fucking helicopter in the music video. It is such an unfocused combination of disparate and consistently horrible styles that it's almost indescribable. Frontman and sole constant member Ronnie Radke is either an ingenious troll or the world's most exquisite choad. Assuming it's not just one big Kaufman-esque front, there is virtually nothing likable about Radke or the music he creates: He writes songs about people on Twitter who don't like him, and is the perfect poster child for the contemptible state of mainstream punk—a misanthropic, out-of-control poseur with a criminal history and a really problematic persecution complex. MT

TUESDAY 2/11

PALLBEARER, LORD DYING, THE BODY
(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) Read our article on Pallbearer.

XDS, NUDITY, LKN
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) Olympia's Nudity share members with a wide range of acts hailing from the Washington state capital, including the gritty and fierce punk outfit Sex/Vid.  The two bands share the honor of being notoriously difficult to Google while at work, and while Nudity's take on psych-rock might seem miles removed from the hardcore played by Sex/Vid, both bands have also earned a reputation for bringing heightened levels of intensity to their live shows. Nudity hammer out their sound with blistering synths and heavy rock riffs. And with tracks like "Here Comes the White Light" pushing the 10-minute mark, the quintet proves able to lash out rhythms with a notable sense of confidence behind the force. The "love rock" term coined by hometown label K Records years ago seems as pinpoint a description as it gets for the kind of music made by a band like Nudity. CT