Up & Coming 

This Week's Music Previews

PUBLIC SERVICE BROADCASTING Sat 2/22 Doug Fir

PUBLIC SERVICE BROADCASTING Sat 2/22 Doug Fir

WEDNESDAY 2/19

MAGIC MOUTH, PHONE CALL, IBQT
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

PIXIES, BEST COAST
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) Pixies have existed mostly as a nostalgia act since reanimating about a decade ago—a touring band with four albums of classic material from which to pull, all of it released more than 20 years ago. The recent shakeups in the Pixies camp are that longtime bassist Kim Deal left the band, and they've released a couple EPs of new material. Both of those things suck. While Deal's headbutting with frontman Black Francis had been much chronicled during the band's first go-around, her official exit came without much elaboration. And the first Deal-less releases, EP1 and EP2, are unexciting, limp facsimiles of an idea of what Pixies kinda sound like—a copy of a copy. But as a nostalgia act, shuffling those four albums in any order makes for a can't-miss set every time. MATTHEW W. SULLIVAN

ELENI MANDELL, VIKESH KAPOOR
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Eleni Mandell is one of those longtime LA scenesters who is known and appreciated outside her hometown artists' community, but even moreso within it—kind of like pop savant Jon Brion, who, by the way, produced and played on Mandell's debut album, 1999's Wishbone. Early in her career, Mandell's jazzy, shadowy folk-noir drew comparisons to Tom Waits, and in 2003, she made a certifiably twangy album of tradition-minded honky-tonk tunes. Her new album, Let's Fly a Kite, finds Mandell exploring a new vein—a swanky '70s-ish singer/songwriter sound—with Nick Lowe's producer and backing band. (She made the connections while touring with Lowe in recent years.) The album also features Mandell's first batch of songs ("Little Joy," "Put My Baby to Bed") heavily influenced by the 2010 birth of her twins. The combo of classic pop and familial bliss makes Kite a lovely, joyous listen from a woman with lots of those in her catalog. BEN SALMON [UPDATE: This show has been canceled.]

DARK TRANQUILLITY, OMNIUM GATHERUM, EXMORTUS, SOUTHGATE, TERRACLIPSE
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) When death metal was first kicking its tires in America in the mid- to late '80s, it tended to be a gore-obsessed collection of brutal riffs, exemplified by the likes of Death (the early stuff), Obituary, and Cannibal Corpse. Over in Sweden, a more melodic version of the subgenre gained traction, with bands like At the Gates and In Flames weaving more New Wave of British Heavy Metal elements into extreme metal. One of the earliest pioneers of that Swedish sound was Dark Tranquillity, who've spent the past two and a half decades churning out the most consistently good catalog of all the early Swedish death metalers. MWS

THURSDAY 2/20

HOOKERS, DENVER, REGULAR MUSIC
(Kenton Club, 2025 N Kilpatrick) See My, What a Busy Week!

SUN KIL MOON
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Read our article on Sun Kil Moon.

PROPAGANDHI, THE FLATLINERS, WAR ON WOMEN
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) Read our article on Propagandhi.

ALBATROSS, THE MORALS
(Clyde's Prime Rib, 5474 NE Sandy) Locally regarded as a time capsule of yesteryear elegance, and upholding a stoic loyalty to both '70s décor and the importance of a fine steak, Clyde's Prime Rib isn't exactly the type of joint you'd expect to see a rock band hold its record-release show. Then again, Albatross frontman Ryan Sollee isn't exactly a stranger to eyebrow-raising venues (his other project, the Builders and the Butchers, started off as a busking group). The lounge area of the restaurant has long hosted local jazz and R&B artists, but is untested in the rock vein—until tonight. They've chosen a fitting test sample with Albatross, whose self-titled debut is a gloomy, dramatic Americana smorgasbord that also features Wooden Indian Burial Ground's Paul Seely, and Cristina Cano from Sallie Ford's new band. The show is free, too. Dinner jacket optional. RYAN J. PRADO

PORTLAND JAZZ FESTIVAL: BRIAN BLADE AND THE FELLOWSHIP BAND
(Dolores Winningstad Theatre, 1111 SW Broadway) Since jazz sprang from New Orleans back in the days of bowlers and petticoats, the Crescent City has always hosted a rich tradition of jazz musicians. Brian Blade is no exception. Known for his clean, sharp drumming skills, Blade has studied and played with jazz greats like Ellis Marsalis and Harold Battiste, and has recorded with everybody from Joni Mitchell to Herbie Hancock to Bob Dylan. In 1998, Blade teamed up with the Fellowship, a group of friends who were also seasoned musicians, creating a sound and a dynamic that make listeners feel cool and sophisticated, like they're part of the party. The Portland Jazz Festival can't suck too much this year when Brian Blade and the Fellowship are at the helm of its opening night. ROSE FINN

OLD AGE, PAULO ZAPPOLI AND THE BREAK, NICK DELFFS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) The boys of Old Age come to Portland frequently to shake us with their country swagger, to embrace us with their layered, gritty guitar and scratchy-howled vocals. They bring their twisted, sweet rock 'n 'roll and Beatlesque harmonies everywhere from the sweatiest house show to the Doug Fir, and tonight, they release their full-length, Wildlife, at Mississippi Studios. To say that boots will stomp and arms will flail would be an understatement, because their music hits you when you're least expecting it, unfurling a slow, sentimental love song before turning around to smack you with raw honesty. If you haven't seen them yet, catch them doing what they do best—raging on stage with new songs up their sleeves and whiskey in hand—with some killer opening bands to tie the night together. RACHEL MILBAUER

LET IT WHIP: DAM-FUNK, REV SHINES, MAXX BASS, GWIZSKI, SEX LIFE DJS, KING TIM 33.3
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) After a few years of putting free mixes, remixes, demo tracks, digital singles, and other stray-funk ephemera out on the internet, the SoCal producer known as Dam-Funk came through with a couple of actual albums in the second half of 2013. One was called Higher, a glistening retro-space-funk collaboration with Steve Arrington, the singer from '70s Ohio funk band Slave. The other—released under the name 7 Days of Funk—paired Dam with rap icon Snoop Dogg for a laid-back, trunk-rattling tour of the best after-the-afterparty of the year. (It also reaffirmed that P-Funk-powered hiphop is Snoop's comfort zone; 7 Days' self-titled is his best effort in a long time.) Point is: It was nice to finally have real Dam-Funk recordings to enjoy, but ultimately, that won't matter much on Thursday when he arrives in Portland to reduce Holocene's Let It Whip dance party to a quivering puddle of bass-heavy boogie-funk. BS

FRIDAY 2/21

SILENT DISCO PATIO PARTY
(Rontoms, 600 E Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

ART ALEXAKIS
(Alhambra Theatre, 4811 SE Hawthorne) I've always chafed at the term "guilty pleasure." It's damage control. You shouldn't feel guilty for liking anything (unless it's Chik-fil-A). That being said, I feel at least a little guilty for liking Everclear as much as I do. The other day, I was bumping So Much for the Afterglow but turned that shit off as soon as I realized one of my roommates was right outside my door. Here's why: On one hand, Everclear are pretty emblematic of late-'90s post-grunge radio schmaltz, alongside (admittedly way, way worse) groups like Sugar Ray and Lit. And despite what lead singer Art Alexakis' trademark soul patch and ice-cold bleached hair may imply, he has no punk cred at all—his detractors (approximately the entire population of Portland, Oregon) insist he's an LA-to-the-core opportunist aesthete, and there's probably some truth to that. It doesn't matter, though. "Father of Mine" is a bulletproof pop song, certainly better than anything Heatmiser ever recorded. Don't worry, Art; the elitist natives just don't get it. MORGAN TROPER

BLOOD OF KINGS, ALPHA VIPER, BLOOD MAGIC, TROJAN SWAMP MONSTER
(Tonic Lounge, 3100 NE Sandy) Featuring ex-members of Excruciator and Spellcaster, Portland fret-shredders Alpha Viper formed in 2013, siphoning the noodling of Yngwie Malmsteen and the hard-rock razing of Judas Priest to cast a sizzling spell all their own. Having been relegated primarily to gritty local bills at East End, the band's theatrical bent (dig the metal warrior garb) heightens an already focused dedication to thrashy/melodic forefathers like Queensrÿche. Seattle's Blood of Kings come to town towing muscular speed-metal with hair-raising vocals, heavy riffs, and motorik drums. The band recorded their debut LP, Starvation, with Tad Doyle at his Witch Ape Studio—a wise choice for fans of Doyle's emphasis on low-end growlers. Plus, two of the bands have "blood" in their names. What more do you want? RJP

SATURDAY 2/22

PORTLAND JAZZ FESTIVAL: BUSTER WILLIAMS, CÉCILE MCLORIN SALVANT
(Newmark Theatre, 1111 SW Broadway) Read our article on Cécile McLorin Salvant.

CHEATAHS, PONY VILLAGE
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Read our article on Cheatahs.

GRAND OPENING: MARISA ANDERSON, THEE HEADLINERS, PENDEJO, SAD HORSE
(Turn! Turn! Turn!, 8 NE Killingsworth) Tonight marks the grand opening of Turn! Turn! Turn!, a brand-new establishment taking over the space recently vacated by Record Room. The MO is pretty similar—a variety of beers on tap and racks full of records to sift through—but owner Scott Derr takes the appropriate next step. There are sandwiches to be consumed, vintage audio equipment to be tempted by, and a choice selection of old zines to page through while you're sipping your IPA. The celebration tonight is capped off by a lineup featuring the guitar wizardry of Marisa Anderson and the first show in ages from gritty rockers Thee Headliners. ROBERT HAM

POISON IDEA, LONG KNIFE, BI-MARKS
(Star Bar, 639 SE Morrison) The first time I saw local hardcore act Bi-Marks, they were sharing a bill with Brooklyn's Nude Beach. Nothing could have prepared me for the force Bi-Marks were about to unleash, but the Tom Petty-indebted power-pop played by Nude Beach certainly made for an amusingly incongruous introduction. Soon, fist-pumping anthems quickly made way for a breakneck onslaught of punk, along with one of the rowdiest circle pits I've ever witnessed. As tables were tossed and turned, the bartender bravely abandoned his post to create a human barrier between the possessed crowd and accumulating piles of broken glass. Any track off Bi-Marks' relentless 2012 release The Golden Years would fit nicely on an early-'80s hardcore compilation that would have featured a few of the genre's progenitors—say, for instance, Portland's own Poison Idea. Tonight those two forces combine for what should feel like something of a highly combustible torch-passing ceremony. CHIPP TERWILLIGER

SHAWN SMITH, HEARTS OF OAK, STENNER GLEN
(Dante's, 350 W Burnside) Shawn Smith's voice could caress wallpaper from the walls, like panties in Prince's proximity. The two share a soulful, funky vocal fortitude, but I think Smith's rocking through the religious era of the Purple One's history right now. And it turns out Jesus-y music does not make for great sexytimes. (I know, right?!) Smith has made some fantastic albums in his two-decade career, with Seattle bands Brad (Shame), Satchel (The Family), and Pigeonhed (The Full Sentence), and don't even get me going on his collaborations with Greg Dulli in the Twilight Singers (Twilight as Played by the Twilight Singers). Now that he's turned his recent solo efforts to singing about redemption—as on the prolific musician's newest album Kid Bakersfield—his songs feel a little toothless, garnished with a certain number of religious platitudes, which makes for sadder, older, life-questioning fare. Yet his talent is undeniable—see album standouts "The Life You Saved" and "The Man that You See in Me." Smith's voice is still a really awesome instrument; I just wish he were still into singing soul instead of saving souls. I suspect everyone's underpinnings will stay firmly in check at the show... unless the back catalog comes out to play. COURTNEY FERGUSON

APE MACHINE, MOS GENERATOR, DIESTO
(Tonic Lounge, 3100 NE Sandy) Portland's Ape Machine chose the right band name. Their music is primal, but they take their Sabbathian riffs into a brave new world. The band has tightened their stoner grooves on their latest full-length, Mangled by the Machine, making the melodies as lethal as the riffs (which are on full display from start to finish). Ape Machine will make you forget that blues and boogie and mustaches ever went out of style only to eventually come back in style. Pop it into the eight-track player, peel the sun roof off the ol' Firebird, and let the good times roll. MARK LORE

PORTLAND JAZZ FESTIVAL: TOSHIKO AKIYOSHI, LEW TABACKIN
(Dolores Winningstad Theatre, 1111 SW Broadway) What makes Toshiko Akiyoshi unusual isn't her 14 Grammy nominations, the documentary made about her, or her background of numerous immigrations. She's one of very few women of her generation to lead a jazz band and compose, let alone with such technique and finesse. Jazz historically planted roots in African musical traditions, but Akiyoshi early on began to implement the chord progressions of her Japanese heritage, integrating those with influences like Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus, and Bud Powell. Having once self-described her music as putting more emphasis on the quality of notes rather than quantity, Akiyoshi combines unique piano hooks with improvisation so crisp and intricate, it could have fallen out of the lining of Miles Davis' right pocket. RF

PUBLIC SERVICE BROADCASTING, KIEV
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Public Service Broadcasting's method of writing songs around samples from public domain educational films and documentaries isn't the most original of ideas. New York's the Books spent the better part of 12 years mining similar material for inspiration. But that doesn't mean PSB is any less delightful. What serves the London duo and their debut album, Inform - Educate - Entertain, best is the steady drumming of multi-instrumentalist Wrigglesworth and the cheeky, borderline cornball melodies cooked up by the band's leader J. Willgoose, Esq. Their first show in Portland should prove to be a geeky feast for both the eyes and the ears. RH

RINGO DEATHSTARR, PURPLE DAYDREAM MACHINE, TENDER AGE
(Ash Street Saloon, 225 SW Ash) If there were a prize for the most ridiculous name in noise-pop, Austin's Ringo Deathstarr would certainly share top honors with the just-as-absurdly-named Cardiff group Joanna Gruesome. But when you look to the vast sea of acts that are pounding pedals and blasting out amps in an attempt to channel shoegaze pioneers like My Bloody Valentine, choosing a name that's sure to elicit a quick double-take suddenly doesn't seem all that crazy. Since forming in 2005, Ringo Deathstarr have been writing songs that ably justify the attention they might receive for their name. Fresh off tour with the Smashing Pumpkins, the band hits 2014 running on the stormy mini-LP Gods Dream. The release keeps an appealing fuzz-pop sensibility firmly intact as the trio breaches the realms of shoegaze revival with some of their heaviest material to date. CHIPP TERWILLIGER

SUNDAY 2/23

PENTAGRAM, RADIO MOSCOW, KINGS DESTROY, SONS OF HUNS, MOTHERS WHISKEY
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) This show marks the third time Pentagram plays Portland since singer Bobby Leibling's resurrection from his parent's sub-basement, and the utter depths of a supreme drug addiction. On the first tour, the bug-eyed Great Grandfather of Doom burst back onto the scene in true form. The second tour was crippled when the guitar player quit the band six hours before the bus was about to shove off. The decision to continue the tour, with another guitar player that could only play about 15 minutes of Pentagram material, was a poor one. Their "blues jam" set seemingly signaled the end of Leibling's run. However, just before Pentagram faded away, in swooped Victor Griffin, guitar player from the band's first official release in 1985. Griffin joined Leibling on the 2011 record Last Rites, and has been playing with the band ever since. With Griffin's skillful guitar work backing up Leibling's gyrating and all-around showmanship, this third time around should be the charm. ARIS WALES Also See My, What a Busy Week!

ICELAND: PROJECTILE, HAMMERS TO GLASS, JERRY ABSTRACT, OUR LOVING SUN, WNDFRM, DÜRRE
(Grand Café/Andrea's Cha Cha Club, 832 SE Grand) Iceland is a new night that features two rooms showcasing forward-thinking electronic music, from eclectic dance music to ambient downtempo, all under one roof. Hammers to Glass (Adam Johnson) and Projectile (Matt Arnold), both highly accomplished artists in the industry, are the masterminds behind this event, with a plan to bring a new, cutting-edge sound to Portland. The night will be heady with emphasis on innovative music that doesn't bother to follow trends. Portland favorite Jerry Abstract will also be on hand to perform his usual delectably tempting mix of techno debauchery. CHRISTINA BROUSSARD

SNOWBLIND TRAVELER
(Al's Den, 303 SW 12th) In what ought to amount to an introduction of sorts for lots of Portlanders, Matt Dorrien—AKA Snowblind Traveler—brings snapshots of yesteryear balladry and Americana to a weeklong stint at Al's Den. Dorrien released Lost on the North Hills in early 2013, an LP steeped in smart, melodic acoustic guitar work with downtrodden tales and tribal rhythms. His upcoming full-length, Confederate Burials, is a stunning collection of gritty, temporal meditations on wartime ("Confederate Burial") when it's not embracing Harry Nilsson on songs like "Lobster" and "Lazy Stream" or odes to Chinatown in "SF Shanghai." It's the type of album that almost everyone is going to gush over when it's released, so you might as well get a leg up now. RJP

MONDAY 2/24

LANGHORNE SLIM, RYAN SOLLEE
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See My, What a Busy Week!

SNOWBLIND TRAVELER
(Al's Den, 303 SW 12th) See Sunday's listing.

WE WERE PROMISED JETPACKS, HONEYBLOOD
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) We Were Promised Jetpacks' first triumph was the indelible "Quiet Little Voices" from their debut LP These Four Walls, a consistently enjoyable—if not groundbreaking—indie record. The Scottish group's follow-up however, In the Pit of the Stomach, released in 2011, is a whole different story. Sonically, In the Pit is a massive evolution—it might be the best sounding semi-mainstream rock record I've heard in years. The drums are cavernous and saturated, and the guitars teeter delicately between chiming and blown-out territories. The group's breathtaking dynamic and tonal range is best exemplified on the angular opener, mini-anthem "Circles and Squares"—but the real highlight song-wise is "Human Error," a ripper that sounds like U2 if they were actually a rock band. MT

PORTLAND JAZZ FESTIVAL: YELLOWJACKETS
(Jimmy Mak's, 221 NW 10th) Fusion jazz is the oft-maligned subset of jazz that seems like it was built entirely for middle-aged white folks who still fancy themselves a little bit "funky." True or not, you've gotta pay your respects to a group like Yellowjackets, a quartet that has been making easy-on-the-ears grooves for nearly 40 years. The 2014 edition of the group only features one original member, keyboardist Russell Ferrante, but has not lost an iota of their smooth approach in the transition. Key to that is the recent inclusion of Felix Pastorius, who brings a rubbery swing to the group that should be familiar to fans of his more famous father, Jaco. RH

TUESDAY 2/25

TOM BROSSEAU, SHELBY EARL
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See My, What a Busy Week!

SNOWBLIND TRAVELER
(Al's Den, 303 SW 12th) See Sunday's listing.

Tags:

Comments

Showing 1-1 of 1

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-1 of 1

Comments are closed.

People who saved…

From the Archives

Staff Pick Events

Most Commented On

Top Viewed Stories

All contents © Index Newspapers, LLC

115 SW Ash St. Suite 600
Portland, OR 97204

Contact Info | Privacy Policy | Production Guidelines | Terms of Use | Takedown Policy