Up & Coming 

Highlights in Music the Week of January 26-February 1

THE SUICIDE NOTES The Know, 1/27

THE SUICIDE NOTES The Know, 1/27

THURSDAY 1/26

DOOMTREE, SAPIENT, SIMS, LAZERBEAK, CECIL OTTER, P.O.S., MIKE MICTLAN, DESSA
(Branx, 320 SE 2nd) See My, What a Busy Week!

JESSIE BAYLIN, THE WATSON TWINS
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Jessie Baylin.

JEREMY JAY, SEAPONY, GHOST ANIMAL
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Jeremy Jay will give you slow, body-swaying melodies, crooning and forlorn "oohs" and "ahhs," all while unfalteringly holding your attention hostage. Jay is promoting his new album Dream Diary, a collection of songs that holds true to his history of single guitar and percussion sounds often accompanied by ethereal and faraway-sounding vocals. This show won't be a sit-down, sip-your-drink-and-take-it-all-in kind of evening, though—if you don't want it to be, that is. Though Jay's music is on the slower side, the beats are crisp and you can't help moving around a little while you listen. ELENA BUCKLEY

GREGORY MILES HARRIS, AUDIE DARLING, STEVEN THE CELLO GUY
(The Waypost, 3120 N Williams) I first heard Audie Darling's music in a public place and found myself caught off guard, wondering what beauty was gracing my ears. It turned out to be her 2009 album Full of Ghosts, a lovely collection of Americana-inspired songs with Darling's endearing voice as the centerpiece. Recorded at Adam Selzer's venerable Type Foundry studios with the assistance of a gaggle of local performers, Darling has clearly found the sonic camaraderie so common to Portland. Coming from a family of musicians in Nashville, her savvy and comfort with the medium is apparent, and her delivery rings with a bittersweet knowingness. Her return to Portland with a spattering of performances comes on the heels of completing a new album in Nashville. MARANDA BISH

FRIDAY 1/27

INTO THE WOODS SECOND ANNIVERSARY: NIGHTMOVES, GRANDPARENTS, 1939 ENSEMBLE
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) See My, What a Busy Week!

ED AND THE RED REDS, MERIDIAN, W.C. BECK AND THE VALIANT SWAINS, EZZA ROSE
(The Piano Fort, 1715 SE Spokane) Read our article on Ed and the Red Reds.

BEATS ANTIQUE
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) Read our article on Beats Antique.

THE SUICIDE NOTES, YOUTHBITCH, THE FLIP TOPS
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) The A-side of the debut single from the Suicide Notes is a punky pop gem that's gonna be rolling around my head until summertime at least. "Hey Baby" makes full use of the group's three singers—Jessi Lixx, Double A, and Miss Joseph—with a call-and-response chorus and an undeniably catchy melody that's built around an ingenious pop structure. And in welcome contrast to the sunny, girl-group vibe they initially seem to emit, the Suicide Notes offer real muscle in the guitars, bass, and drums of their backline, plus a few unexpected flourishes like the brass fanfare in B-side "Last Chance." The single celebrates its release on Hovercraft Records tonight, marking the recorded debut of what is assuredly going to be one of Portland's most loved bands. Mark my words—the party starts now. NED LANNAMANN

JOE MCMURRIAN, BLIND BARTIMAEUS
(LaurelThirst Public House, 2958 NE Glisan) Sometimes artists give you a bit of a break from having to decode the zeros and ones of their works. With a name like Blind Bartimaeus—in homage both to the sight-cured roadside beggar from the Gospel of Mark, as well as to sight-hampered blues musicians of the pre-war South—you'd reasonably expect gospel-tinged songs of love and faith. Well, close. Gospel Songs of God & Death, released in December, travels road-tested gospel-folk, with only acoustic guitar and violin to guide it through its dark expanses. Vocalist/guitarist Santi Elijah Holley's whiskey-whispered singing, and ghostly harmonies from Liz Chibucos prove a potent one-two, especially in more upbeat tunes (in tempo, mind you; certainly not lyrically) like "As Cold and Lonesome As the Moon," in which Holley describes a woman with a "Xanax grin and nicotine teeth" over jaunty finger-picked blues. It's a lesson in contrasts, and an easygoing one to boot. RYAN J. PRADO

SATURDAY 1/28

BEAT CONNECTION, WAMPIRE, DJ JEFFREY JERUSALEM, SEX LIFE
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

ALABAMA SHAKES, QUIET LIFE
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Alabama Shakes.

THE BLACK SWANS, FLASH FLOOD AND THE DIKES, FISHERMEN 3, SIR RICHARD BISHOP
(Kenton Club, 2025 N Kilpatrick) On Yesterday's Wine, Willie Nelson talks to God—literally. And the interesting part is that God talks back. The 1971 album begins with spoken-word dialogue that infuses the rest of the record with a gothic piousness. The Black Swans employed a similar tactic on their 2011 album Don't Blame the Stars, although singer Jerry DeCicca introduces each song by talking not to God but to you, resulting in a record that plays not so much like an album as a nighttime radio show transmitted from somewhere long gone in America's dusty, spooky past. The musical portion collects weather-beaten folk and funereal gospel, haunted by the ghost of violinist Noel Sayre, who died in a swimming accident shortly following the initial recording sessions. The Ohio band plays a surprising but welcome (and free) show at the Kenton Club, opened by former Sun City Girls guitar mage Sir Richard Bishop. NL

FUJIYA & MIYAGI, ADVENTURES WITH MIGHT, HERE COME DOTS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Fujiya & Miyagi have been together for 12 years and five albums, but that hasn't diminished their passion for krautrock one bit. An obsession for Can and Kraftwerk can't just vanish overnight, not even with the aid of Thom Monahan, producer of the very non-electronic Pernice Brothers and Vetiver. On Ventriloquizzing, Fujiya & Miyagi's dark, spooky dance tunes are composed with just as much precision as ever. Elegant, thoughtfully constructed, and layered with David Best's menacing, robotic whisper-singing—this is music that seems like it must be taken Very Seriously. That's until you realize the seemingly profound lyrics are completely tongue-in-cheek (right?), e.g., "You go up and go down like a yo-yo" repeated over and over again. REBECCA WILSON

BROOKLYN RIDER
(Kaul Auditorium at Reed College, 3203 SE Woodstock) The last time I saw Brooklyn Rider, Meryl Streep and Michelle Obama were watching them with me (so what if we weren't sitting next to each other?). That was on the televised Kennedy Center Honors show for the lifetime achievement of Yo-Yo Ma, the often-smiling cellist who formed an ensemble called the Silk Road Project—which is where the members of Brooklyn Rider met. They're a young string quartet that wants to be more than just an old string quartet; "borderless communication" is their stated goal. And their 2010 concert at Town Hall was some kind of hit. This time they'll do one of Beethoven's late, intense quartets (these are killer pieces of music, and this one is his favorite: Op. 131), "Suite for String Quartet" from Bent by Philip Glass, Kol Nidre by John Zorn, and a work by member player Colin Jacobson. JEN GRAVES

SUNDAY 1/29

THE PARSON RED HEADS, TOMMY KEENE
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) In his introduction to the power-pop progenitor's ferocious performance on Late Night in '94, Conan O'Brien declared Tommy Keene "one of the best pop songwriters in the business." A single spin of his 1986 benchmark album, Places That Are Gone, will tell you that's no exaggeration. Anybody with a penchant for pop is guaranteed to be fairly keen on, well, virtually everything Keene has released. His output is remarkably consistent, and unlike conspecifics Chris Stamey or hell, R.E.M., Keene hasn't chilled out with the passing of years. In fact, his latest record, entitled Behind the Parade, might be his grittiest to date. MORGAN TROPER Also see My, What a Busy Week!

TRAVIS LAPLANTE, TREVOR DUNN, THICKET, U SCO
(Laughing Horse Books, 12 NE 10th) Whoever thought prog and punk would be so suited for each other? Certainly the possibility of a compromise occurred to Robert Fripp (look no further than Red-era King Crimson for an example of early prog-punk-rock, which was one of his better ideas). Ryan Miller, guitarist in the Portland-based progressive, experimental, post-whatever band U Sco, has also combined the two almost contradictory styles with ambiguous and riveting results. It's essentially aggressive progressive rock, but stripped of (most) of the unpleasant excesses and regurgitated medieval allusions associated with the genre. In other words, it's restless and exciting as hell, while still containing elements that will stimulate your classically trained friend's virginal ears. Besides, Travis LaPlante (of Little Women) and Trevor Dunn (of Mr. Bungle) are worth the price of admission alone. It's all a reminder that some of the most abrasive, aberrant sounds in the city are emanating from modest all-ages spaces. MT

MONDAY 1/30

WOLVES IN THE THRONE ROOM, TRAGEDY, DRUDEN
(Branx, 320 SE 2nd) See My, What a Busy Week!

TUESDAY 1/31

GHOST, BLOOD CEREMONY, ANCIENT VVISDOM
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE 39th) I have heard exactly one heavy music fan claim they did not care for Blood Ceremony's self-titled 2008 debut. Are you fucking kidding me? Unabashed Iommi-worshipping guitar, sinister organ, and lyrics birthed from the Necronomicon swirl from netherworldly depths to otherworldly heights—and that's just the first song. Once vocalist/organist Alia O'Brien puts her lips to the mouthpiece and conjures that first flute (yes, flute) solo, the trip really begins. This dark sorceress leads a druggy, unholy dance at the altar of the RIFF, her minions banging their heads approvingly as she lights the pyre beneath you. Yes, this album is a stone classic and that person I mentioned earlier obviously has shit for brains. The Toronto band makes their long overdue Portland debut tonight. Don't miss out. ETHAN JAYNE Also read our article on Ghost.

GRAVEYARD, RADIO MOSCOW
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Graveyard is a pack of Swedish ghouls that have robbed the crypt of rock and roll for all its forgotten trinkets and jewels. Unlike most modern retro-rock outfits who've picked at the dry bones of Pentagram's boogieman blues, Graveyard opted to crack open a few different coffins. On their latest slab, Hisingen Blues, they display some of the treasures they found with their necromantic pursuits. They push some hard-charging, hand-clapping MC5 blues and lace it with some darkened Uriah Heep and Jefferson Airplane psychedelia. To keep from seeming too fiendish, they occasionally stop and breathe with a slow and soulful Free groove. Consequently, by digging up the past, Graveyard may have given new life to the stale corpse of rock and roll. ARIS WALES

WEDNESDAY 2/1

13 MONTHS OF SUNSHINE: AFRICAN SOUNDS DANCE PARTY
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) See My, What a Busy Week!

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